Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRudy Perez
IN THE NEWS

Rudy Perez

ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1988 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Choreographer Rudy Perez paces nervously, his arms crossed, as his intense and scrutinizing stare focuses critically on his five sweat-drenched and heavily breathing dancers. They twist, tumble and turn athletically on the rehearsal floor of Westside Academy while also rotating in and out of clear-cut circular formations--all this against the backdrop of Lloyd Rodgers' pulsating, synthesized scales.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988
Reading about the new partnership between Joffrey Ballet (based in New York and Los Angeles) and Cal State L.A. made me realize that even here art is about politics ("Joffrey and Cal State L.A.--Both to Benefit?" by Lewis Segal, Sept. 27). In the 10 years since I relocated from New York City, I see less and less support and opportunity for the Los Angeles dance companies. It never ceases to amaze me how the arts organizations and institutions continually look toward New York for their glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Dance Writer
Rudy Perez remarked in these pages last week that his program for the Los Angeles Festival would represent a summing up of his achievements as a choreographer--and he was right. But, except for a revival of his classic postmodern solo "Countdown" (1965), Perez presented only new works at the Tom Bradley Theatre of the Los Angeles Theatre Center on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1987 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Rudy Perez, who started the postmodern ball rolling in Los Angeles when he relocated here a decade ago, has recently gotten more than he bargained for: A full-page ad with his name emblazoned next to those of Merce Cunningham, John Cage, Ingmar Bergman and Peter Brook: Is that any way for a struggling choreographer and performance artist to be treated by Los Angeles Festival organizers? Needless to say, he's hardly complaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Immediately following the premiere of his "Cold Sweat" Friday in the Margo Albert Theater at the Plaza de la Raza, Rudy Perez spoke to the audience, explaining how his intention to choreograph a romantic work for his six-member company had been changed by ominous recent events. "I watch the news," he said, "and what's happening in the world is kind of scary. . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Nobody in modern dance and dance-based performance art captures the casual style and just as casual cruelty of Los Angeles with quite the icy scorn of Rudy Perez or the wounded but enduring faith of Tim Miller. At 55, Perez looks at the city with the eyes of a wary New York-born outsider. He misses nothing, and in remarkably mordant choreographic action-paintings he penetrates our rituals of self-celebration to reveal the abyss beneath.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|