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November 12, 2009 | Susan King
Larry Karaszewski, who co-wrote such films as "Ed Wood" with Scott Alexander, is presenting a salute tonight to 1970s blaxploitation legend Rudy Ray Moore, who died last year at the age of 81, at the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre. Karaszewski will be screening 1975's "Dolemite" and 1977's " Petey Wheatstraw ." Between films, there will be a discussion with cast members of "Dolemite" and the recently released homage, "Black Dynamite," as well as with director Reginald Hudlin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2009 | Susan King
Larry Karaszewski, who co-wrote such films as "Ed Wood" with Scott Alexander, is presenting a salute tonight to 1970s blaxploitation legend Rudy Ray Moore, who died last year at the age of 81, at the American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre. Karaszewski will be screening 1975's "Dolemite" and 1977's " Petey Wheatstraw ." Between films, there will be a discussion with cast members of "Dolemite" and the recently released homage, "Black Dynamite," as well as with director Reginald Hudlin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart and Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Stewart is a former Times staff writer.
Rudy Ray Moore, the self-proclaimed "Godfather of Rap" who influenced generations of rappers and comedians with his rhyming style, braggadocio and profanity-laced routines, has died. He was 81. Moore, whose low-budget films were panned by critics in the 1970s but became cult classics decades later, died Sunday night in Toledo, Ohio, of complications from diabetes, his brother Gerald told the Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
A whole new generation of innovative filmmakers, such as D.W. Griffith, Emile Cohl and Max Linder, began pushing the envelope of the still-fledgling medium of motion pictures a century ago. On Monday, several of those films from the silent era that captured the imagination of audiences will be featured in "A Century Ago: The Films of 1908" at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Linwood Dunn Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
A whole new generation of innovative filmmakers, such as D.W. Griffith, Emile Cohl and Max Linder, began pushing the envelope of the still-fledgling medium of motion pictures a century ago. On Monday, several of those films from the silent era that captured the imagination of audiences will be featured in "A Century Ago: The Films of 1908" at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Linwood Dunn Theater.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
Getting capricious clubgoers to frequent a place with a dubious past (and one off the beaten path, no less) without totally remodeling it or establishing a whole new identity is nearly impossible. But Little Pedro's is not only doing it, it's doing it with no money, no velvet ropes and no hype -- and it's kept both its unfettered ambience and its regulars in the process. Built in the late 1800s, Little Pedro's is one of the oldest bars in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Is there a filmmaker out there who will do the right thing and make a movie about the Ed Wood-like wonder that is "Dolemite?" A so-bad-it's-great compendium of blaxploitation movie cliches that surely stirred the fire inside the young Quentin Tarantino, 1975's "Dolemite" has it all: steely antihero, leering gangsters, corrupt cops, gratuitous sex and violence, outlandish pimp suits and an all-girl kung fu squad.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD, Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to five stars (a classic).
Oakland's M.C. Hammer is kind of the Paula Abdul of rap, a fine dancer with a weak voice, a wholesome and charming performer who sells unforeseen millions of records and looks good on MTV. His platinum debut, "Let's Get It Started," spent months in the Top 10 of Billboard's black music chart last year. Unfortunately, where Abdul has gifted and famous guys like L.A. & Babyface writing and producing her songs, Hammer does it all himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1995 | Jonathan Gold
P-Funk samples are very nice, Uzi-death imagery a useful condiment, but the soul of the hard-core rap thing has always lain in the blaxploitation pimp-rhyme made famous by such West Coast comedians as Rudy Ray Moore--the breathtakingly blue suppositions about your mother, your girlfriend and the woman in the front row. If you're concerned about the self-reflexive sexism in hip-hop, pimp rhyming is the throbbing heart of the beast.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | DON WALLER
Making his first local appearance in the 20-odd years that he's been doing what amounts to a black, XXX-rated version of Weird Al Yankovic's shtick, cult hero Blowfly (a.k.a. hit R&B songwriter/performer Clarence Reid) wowed the capacity crowd at the Lingerie on Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart and Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Stewart is a former Times staff writer.
Rudy Ray Moore, the self-proclaimed "Godfather of Rap" who influenced generations of rappers and comedians with his rhyming style, braggadocio and profanity-laced routines, has died. He was 81. Moore, whose low-budget films were panned by critics in the 1970s but became cult classics decades later, died Sunday night in Toledo, Ohio, of complications from diabetes, his brother Gerald told the Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Is there a filmmaker out there who will do the right thing and make a movie about the Ed Wood-like wonder that is "Dolemite?" A so-bad-it's-great compendium of blaxploitation movie cliches that surely stirred the fire inside the young Quentin Tarantino, 1975's "Dolemite" has it all: steely antihero, leering gangsters, corrupt cops, gratuitous sex and violence, outlandish pimp suits and an all-girl kung fu squad.
NEWS
June 2, 2005 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
Getting capricious clubgoers to frequent a place with a dubious past (and one off the beaten path, no less) without totally remodeling it or establishing a whole new identity is nearly impossible. But Little Pedro's is not only doing it, it's doing it with no money, no velvet ropes and no hype -- and it's kept both its unfettered ambience and its regulars in the process. Built in the late 1800s, Little Pedro's is one of the oldest bars in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD
Big Daddy Kane might be the finest pure rapper in hip-hop, his dusky baritone the most breathtakingly versatile rap voice, his rhymes the most rhythmically elaborate. Other rappers tend to treat him with the sort of awed respect you might expect Bobby Brown to give Luther Vandross. His free-flowing style was adopted almost whole by L.L. Cool J, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994
Stanley Crouch's masterful "Pulp Friction" (Film Comment, Oct. 16) further validates the MacArthur Foundation's wisdom in acknowledging this world citizen's contributions to art and understanding. What begins as a literate and informative en carriere review of Quentin Tarantino's movies quickly becomes an enlightening essay in American social philosophy, superior in clarity and understanding. Crouch's analysis furthers our understanding of what he calls "ethnic complexity," the blurring and marbling of white and black.
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