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Rudy Vallee

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
Thank you for the Jan. 2 article on the Thousand Oaks library's radio collection. It's great to see a local treasure highlighted for your readers. Although the Rudy Vallee collection was only a small part of the story, I feel it is worth mentioning that Rudy Vallee is still on the air. His radio programs from 1940 can be heard every Sunday at noon on KCLU, 88.3 FM. The library and Eleanor Vallee have been very generous in allowing us to share these programs with the community. MIKE WEST, Program director, KCLU, Thousand Oaks
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NEWS
October 5, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rudy Vallee--America's first pop singing sensation, a radio pioneer, movie and Broadway star--was one heck of a romantic. So romantic, says his fourth wife, that Vallee never forgot the day they met. So romantic, she says, that not long before he died in 1986 at age 85, slumped in his wheelchair, he whispered to her: "You were a vision of Venus walking out of the water. I wanted you immediately."
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NEWS
July 6, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Rudy Vallee, the singer with the raccoon coat and megaphone who was considered the first in a generation of crooners, was remembered by friends and relatives Saturday as "a part of Americana." "He was a great guy. He was a great American," his widow, Eleanor Vallee, said after a memorial service attended by 500 people at St. Charles Catholic Church in North Hollywood. "I thank all of you for loving him so much." Among those attending the service were actresses Dorothy Lamour and Barbara Rush.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
Thank you for the Jan. 2 article on the Thousand Oaks library's radio collection. It's great to see a local treasure highlighted for your readers. Although the Rudy Vallee collection was only a small part of the story, I feel it is worth mentioning that Rudy Vallee is still on the air. His radio programs from 1940 can be heard every Sunday at noon on KCLU, 88.3 FM. The library and Eleanor Vallee have been very generous in allowing us to share these programs with the community. MIKE WEST, Program director, KCLU, Thousand Oaks
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | From Associated Press
Rudy Vallee, whose image as a Yale University graduate crooning "The Whiffenpoof Song" through a megaphone endured a 60-year radio, movie and stage career, was recovering from surgery Wednesday. Vallee, 85, was admitted to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center several days ago, hospital spokesman Ron Wise, said. Vallee's wife of 36 years, Eleanor, has requested that no further information be released about her husband's condition or ailment, Wise said.
NEWS
July 5, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan hailed the late Rudy Vallee on Friday as "an American institution." "A talented and creative pioneer in music, he delighted us all with his trademark raccoon coat and megaphone," Reagan said in a statement issued by White House spokesman Larry Speakes. Vallee died Thursday night in Hollywood at age 84. He had been ill with throat cancer and had suffered a slight stroke when in the hospital.
NEWS
November 10, 1986 | KAREN ROEBUCK, Times Staff Writer
A surprise discovery of Rudy Vallee memorabilia--including 5,000 neckties, a gold watch from actress Mary Pickford and a fedora from W. C. Fields--were found this week in a recently unlocked attic in the late crooner's Hollywood Hills home, Vallee's widow said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1987 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Geraldo Rivera wasn't there. Telly Savalas couldn't make it either. But the scheduled opening of crooner Rudy Vallee's safe Tuesday drew plenty of other notables, including: - One of the top singing impersonators of Vallee (in fact, maybe the only one). - A man who plans to sell 500 Vallee neckties. - A former co-star who revealed that he snubbed her when she saw him at a party a few years ago.
REAL ESTATE
August 2, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Rudy Vallee's widow, the vivacious Eleanor, patted her dogs and welcomed a visitor to the Spanish-style castle she shared with the famous crooner from the time they were married in 1949 until he died at 85 a year ago July 3.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
It's the latest version of Exodus. Rudy Vallee's ties are leaving Hollywood. More than 600 ties that belonged to the late crooner-actor are headed for the board rooms and parlors of America, for the White House and for the office of the prime minister of Japan. It's a new Hollywood promotion, the brainchild of a lawyer named John Schalter, 36, who said he plans to send out the motley collection of neckwear to promote an art competition that he calls the International Art Challenge.
NEWS
November 2, 1995
Freda Granite, 77, veteran Hollywood talent agent whose clients included Susan Anton and Rudy Vallee. A third-generation Angeleno, Mrs. Granite learned to drive in a Model T on Hill Street and attended Poly High School. She was a founding member of the Beverly Hills Parlour of the Native Daughters of the Golden West and during World War II was president of the Hollywood Guild Canteen Juniors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990
When I saw your Calendar cover today about George Michael, "the reluctant pop star," my first reaction was he should thank the good Lord every morning when he wakes up to have all that he has. And that'll make two of us thanking God every morning for all that we have. I don't understand a guy who lives "in hopes of reducing the strain of his celebrity status." Here's a kid who "wanted to be a pop star since I was about 7 years old." And now that he's a smash performer and songwriter at 27 he wants to quit doing what tons of gifted youngsters all over the world would shoot grandma for--just one crack at what he's complaining about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1989 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
Rudy Vallee, the megaphone-carrying crooner and popular radio personality, was a pack rat, say archivists at the Thousand Oaks Library who recently began cataloguing the four-ton collection of papers and mementos he gathered for more than 60 years. Vallee saved X-rays of an impacted wisdom tooth he had extracted in the 1970s, brief notes his fourth wife left on the refrigerator and a copy of the formula for his golden hair dye. Fortunately for students of entertainment history, Vallee also kept thousands of fan letters, radio scripts, musical scores and other items that provide an unusually complete record of the popular culture of his day, said Henry Matoon, an archivist hired to catalogue the collection.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
It's the latest version of Exodus. Rudy Vallee's ties are leaving Hollywood. More than 600 ties that belonged to the late crooner-actor are headed for the board rooms and parlors of America, for the White House and for the office of the prime minister of Japan. It's a new Hollywood promotion, the brainchild of a lawyer named John Schalter, 36, who said he plans to send out the motley collection of neckwear to promote an art competition that he calls the International Art Challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1987 | STEVE HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Geraldo Rivera wasn't there. Telly Savalas couldn't make it either. But the scheduled opening of crooner Rudy Vallee's safe Tuesday drew plenty of other notables, including: - One of the top singing impersonators of Vallee (in fact, maybe the only one). - A man who plans to sell 500 Vallee neckties. - A former co-star who revealed that he snubbed her when she saw him at a party a few years ago.
REAL ESTATE
August 2, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Rudy Vallee's widow, the vivacious Eleanor, patted her dogs and welcomed a visitor to the Spanish-style castle she shared with the famous crooner from the time they were married in 1949 until he died at 85 a year ago July 3.
NEWS
July 4, 1986 | MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writer
Rudy Vallee, the megaphone-carrying crooner who became a star nearly 60 years ago with his tribute to fellow Yalies drinking down at Mory's with their glasses raised on high, died Thursday evening at his Hollywood Hills home. He was 85. Vallee died while watching the Statue of Liberty centennial ceremonies, said his wife, Eleanor. "Rudy was watching the unveiling of the Statue of Liberty and he remarked: 'I wish we could be there; you know how I love a party.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1989 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
Rudy Vallee, the megaphone-carrying crooner and popular radio personality, was a pack rat, say archivists at the Thousand Oaks Library who recently began cataloguing the four-ton collection of papers and mementos that he gathered over more than 60 years. Vallee saved X-rays of an impacted wisdom tooth that was extracted in the 1970s, brief notes that his fourth wife left on the refrigerator and a copy of the formula for his golden hair dye. Fortunately for students of entertainment history, Vallee also kept thousands of fan letters, radio scripts, musical scores and other items that provide an unusually complete record of the popular culture of his day, said Henry Matoon, an archivist hired to catalogue the collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1987
The UCLA Film and Television archive has received a collection of Rudy Vallee films from the singer and actor's widow, Eleanor Vallee. The collection, which covers Vallee's career from 1929-34, is highlighted by an original print of Vallee's first talking feature, "The Vagabond Lover," and closed-circuit footage of Vallee on a mechanical television. The experimental footage is the earliest broadcast in the archive's collection, according to archivist Charles Hopkins.
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