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Rudy Youngblood

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
When Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto" premiered last December, the action-filled film set against the backdrop of the Maya empire launched the career of a young Texan named Rudy Youngblood. In interviews plugging the movie, Youngblood, who plays the film's central character, Jaguar Paw, routinely discussed his Indian ancestry and his connections to three American tribes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
When Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto" premiered last December, the action-filled film set against the backdrop of the Maya empire launched the career of a young Texan named Rudy Youngblood. In interviews plugging the movie, Youngblood, who plays the film's central character, Jaguar Paw, routinely discussed his Indian ancestry and his connections to three American tribes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
A key consultant among several archeologists who served as advisors on Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto" said he is disappointed that the film overlooks many of the Mayas' cultural and scientific achievements and portrays the people as "bloodthirsty savages." As a chase movie, "Apocalypto" is top-notch, said Richard D. Hansen, a professor of anthropology at Idaho State University who has written extensively about the Mayas. The sets, makeup and costumes are also "accurate to the nth degree," he noted.
NEWS
December 6, 2006 | Tom O'Neil
Disney / Touchstone Spellbinding turns in "The Prestige" by Hugh Jackman, Christian Bale and Scarlett Johansson. Rudy Youngblood has an outside chance for "Apocalypto." Focus Features Derek Luke has momentum for "Catch a Fire." Fox Searchlight Oscar may shine on Forest Whitaker ("The Last King of Scotland"), Richard Griffiths ("The History Boys"), Aaron Eckhart ("Thank You for Smoking") and, possibly, Abigail Breslin ("Little Miss Sunshine").
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | John Horn and Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writers
The show business adage that "there's no such thing as bad publicity" is probably true about 99% of the time. But as the media -- and its consumers -- grow obsessively focused on the personal struggles of Hollywood stars, there are rare instances when even a little free exposure can be problematic. On Friday, Paramount Pictures will release "Drillbit Taylor," a new comedy starring Owen Wilson as a bodyguard hired by several high school students looking for bully protection. The film has been accompanied by most of the marketing efforts typically associated with a national theatrical release -- including television promotions and coming attractions previews -- but you can look far and wide and not find Wilson conducting the kind of interviews that stars of his caliber usually do when they have a big movie to promote.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
JHANE Myers certainly wasn't expecting a personal phone call from Mel Gibson. "He said, 'Hello, Jhane, I know you don't know me. This is Mel Gibson, and I really would like to have you call me back,' " Myers recalled. When she did, the Oklahoma City public relations executive found herself enlisted in Gibson's grass-roots marketing campaign for his new film, "Mel Gibson's Apocalypto," due in theaters Dec. 8.
NEWS
December 6, 2006 | TOM O'NEIL
A look at some likely nominees in the lead acting categories. Actor Oscar's biggest empty-handed nominee, Peter O'Toole, may seem invincible if he's nominated for "Venus." No star has ever been snubbed eight times by those notoriously sentimental academy members, who are, after all, in the business of happy endings. Many are gray-haired, randy chaps likely to empathize with O'Toole's portrayal of a dying actor who lusts playfully after a spirited young woman. But nothing is a lock.
NEWS
December 6, 2006 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
THE world is opening up, and it's taking Hollywood with it. Almost a year after the racially tinged "Crash" scored a best picture upset at the Academy Awards, deep explorations of nonwhite cultures have dominated the silver screen as have a number of ethnic performers who have delivered penetrating, emotional portrayals.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Who knows what violence lurks in the hearts of men? Mel Gibson knows, and he just can't resist putting every last ounce of it on screen. He also can't resist pulling those bloody, still-beating hearts out of human bodies and putting them up on screen as well. And that's just the beginning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Sheigh Crabtree, Special to The Times
SQUANDERING precious resources is one of many underlying themes in Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto" and it became a recurring theme during production. Consider this oft-repeated account from the crew on location in Veracruz, Mexico, this spring: Makeup and wardrobe departments arrived at 1 a.m. to outfit more than 1,000 extras with elaborate wigs, prosthetic ears, scars and body paint for the eye-popping Mayan City sequence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2006
About the list: This Sneaks list is a snapshot of films expected to open through the end of the year. Dates and other details are subject to change. Holiday Sneaks: Capsules compiled by Patrick Day and Kinsey Lowe.
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