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Rue Mcclanahan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Rue McClanahan, an actress best known for her Emmy-winning role as the sassy, man-crazy Southern belle Blanche Devereaux on the hit TV series "The Golden Girls," has died. She was 76. McClanahan died early Thursday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital of a brain hemorrhage, according to her manager, Barbara Lawrence. FOR THE RECORD: Rue McClanahan: The headline with the news obituary of actress Rue McClanahan in Friday's LATExtra section gave her year of birth as 1933. As the article noted, she was born in 1934.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Rue McClanahan, an actress best known for her Emmy-winning role as the sassy, man-crazy Southern belle Blanche Devereaux on the hit TV series "The Golden Girls," has died. She was 76. McClanahan died early Thursday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital of a brain hemorrhage, according to her manager, Barbara Lawrence. FOR THE RECORD: Rue McClanahan: The headline with the news obituary of actress Rue McClanahan in Friday's LATExtra section gave her year of birth as 1933. As the article noted, she was born in 1934.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1987 | PATRICIA BRENNAN, Washington Post
Rue McClanahan knew from the outset that she'd probably be upstaged by 8-year-old Keshia Knight Pulliam when they set out to do "The Little Match Girl." Young Pulliam, better known as Rudy Huxtable on "The Cosby Show," gets the title role in a story loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale but set in New England during the 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2009 | Reuters
"Golden Girls" star Rue McClanahan is recovering in a New York hospital after having heart bypass surgery this week, her manager said Thursday. "She's fine, so it could not have gone better," Barbara Lawrence said of Tuesday's operation. McClanahan, 75, played the promiscuous Blanche Devereaux on the hit TV series from 1985 to 1992. This year, she appeared in an episode of "Law & Order."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's the Golden Girl who goes gaga over guys. And now she's flirting with another challenge. This time, it's theater. "I just thought it would be fun," said TV sitcom specialist Rue McClanahan, about the new musical, "Oedipus, Schmedipus, As Long as You Love Your Mother" opening tonight at the Golden Theatre in Burbank. McClanahan, who plays the lusty Blanche on NBC's long-running "Golden Girls," penned the lyrics and music for the farce about a father and son in love with the same woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2009 | Reuters
"Golden Girls" star Rue McClanahan is recovering in a New York hospital after having heart bypass surgery this week, her manager said Thursday. "She's fine, so it could not have gone better," Barbara Lawrence said of Tuesday's operation. McClanahan, 75, played the promiscuous Blanche Devereaux on the hit TV series from 1985 to 1992. This year, she appeared in an episode of "Law & Order."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986 | Craig Modderno
Frank Sinatra is reading a "Magnum P.I." script written especially for him. Should he accept, he'd play a retired cop who's the uncle of series regular Larry Manetti. . . . Jeffrey Jones proves there's life or at least a career after "Howard the Duck." He joins Michael Moriarty and Paul LeMat in the Vietnam War drama, "Hanoi Hilton," now shooting in town. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1986 | LEE MARGULIES
"Lord, my family never brings me anything but humiliation and grief," moans Thelma Harper. And eternal life, it would seem. More than two years after it was last seen on NBC, "Mama's Family" is back, returning with new episodes Saturday at 6:30 p.m. on KNBC Channel 4, starring Vicki Lawrence in a role she has been playing for more than a dozen years now.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Michael Oblowitz and writer-producer Larry Gross have a tough time getting a grip on "This World, Then the Fireworks," a lurid, low-down adaptation of a story by legendary hard-boiled writer Jim Thompson. As a result, "This World" lumbers and strains too often when it should snap and crackle. It's the late '20s and the lives of two small children, brother and sister, are blasted when their father, in your classic fit of jealous rage, takes a shotgun to his lover and her husband, a cop.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett can't seem to shut up while watching a movie. But their pithy commentaries earned them a cult following -- and a prestigious Peabody Award, no less -- on "Mystery Science Theater 3000," the Comedy Central/Sci Fi comedy series that made fun of really bad movies, such as "Santa Claus Conquers the Martians" and "Girls Town." Though the series ended in 1999, the three Minneapolis-based writer-actors never stopped talking over movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Michael Oblowitz and writer-producer Larry Gross have a tough time getting a grip on "This World, Then the Fireworks," a lurid, low-down adaptation of a story by legendary hard-boiled writer Jim Thompson. As a result, "This World" lumbers and strains too often when it should snap and crackle. It's the late '20s and the lives of two small children, brother and sister, are blasted when their father, in your classic fit of jealous rage, takes a shotgun to his lover and her husband, a cop.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's the Golden Girl who goes gaga over guys. And now she's flirting with another challenge. This time, it's theater. "I just thought it would be fun," said TV sitcom specialist Rue McClanahan, about the new musical, "Oedipus, Schmedipus, As Long as You Love Your Mother" opening tonight at the Golden Theatre in Burbank. McClanahan, who plays the lusty Blanche on NBC's long-running "Golden Girls," penned the lyrics and music for the farce about a father and son in love with the same woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Connie Monaghan makes the switch from critic to playwright with the Jan. 7 opening of her romantic comedy "Love or Something Out on Highway 97" at the CAST Theatre. "Bud is an ex-con and Archie is his former cellmate," the writer said of her characters. "Bud falls for a woman named Sal, who happens to shoplift--a lot. She in turn is concerned with conjuring up the ghost of her ex-husband." Monaghan, who's been a critic at the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Since performer Kedric Robin Wolfe got a standing ovation at the Wallenboyd Theatre Saturday--and it wasn't even opening night--he must have something to say to an audience. I'll be hornswoggled if I can see what it is. Wolfe was appearing on the "Angel's Flight" series, sponsored by Pipeline and the Museum of Contemporary Art. He performed a self-created piece called "Warren's Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1987 | PATRICIA BRENNAN, Washington Post
Rue McClanahan knew from the outset that she'd probably be upstaged by 8-year-old Keshia Knight Pulliam when they set out to do "The Little Match Girl." Young Pulliam, better known as Rudy Huxtable on "The Cosby Show," gets the title role in a story loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale but set in New England during the 1920s.
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