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Rufino Tamayo

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NEWS
August 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Mexico's most famous living painter, Rufino Tamayo, is having his first exhibition in the Soviet Union, the government news agency Notimex said Saturday. It said Tamayo, who turned 90 on Saturday, will attend the opening of the show Tuesday in Moscow. A total of 125 works, including paintings and drawings, will be on exhibit in Moscow throughout the month of September, Notimex said. Tamayo's works will later go on display in Leningrad, it said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Mary Rourke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
June Wayne, who helped pioneer a revival of fine-art print making in the 1960s when she founded the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, has died. She was 93. An accomplished artist in her own right, Wayne died Tuesday at her home in Los Angeles after a long illness, according to her assistant, Larry Workman. Wayne gained an international reputation starting in 1960 when she began to invite leading artists to collaborate with professional printers at Tamarind and create artist's prints.
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NEWS
June 25, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Rufino Tamayo, who gained international fame for incorporating the bright colors and motifs of Mexican folk art into distinctly modern works, died Monday at a Mexico City hospital. He was 91. Tamayo was hospitalized June 12 with pneumonia and had been listed in serious condition since then. Friends said his health had been failing since he underwent open heart surgery in Houston nearly two years ago and that for months he had been unable to paint.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
An abstract masterpiece by a Mexican artist that was found in the trash by a woman who knew little about modern art has been sold for more than $1 million. The painting, "Tres Personajes," by Rufino Tamayo, was discovered in 2003 by Elizabeth Gibson, who spotted it on her morning walk on Manhattan's Upper West Side. She took it home because, she said, "Even though I didn't understand it, I knew it had power."
BOOKS
January 24, 1988 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto's interview with Rufino Tamayo will appear in this month's issue of Mexico en el Arte
At age 88, Rufino Tamayo continues exploring the special and symbolic grounds of the imagination through his mysteriously magical paintings, lithographs and "mixografias."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In 1921, Rufino Tamayo got a job as head of the ethnographic department at the National Museum of Archaeology in Mexico City. Dissatisfied with his rigidly traditional, European-style training in drawing and painting at what was then known as the Academia de Arte de San Carlos, he had left school in search of the kind of aesthetic authenticity he had always felt as a kid, growing up in the shadow of Monte Alban in the southern city of Oaxaca.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2007 | Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- A painting stolen 20 years ago was found lying in trash along a street, and now it could fetch up to $1 million at auction. Elizabeth Gibson didn't know anything about the brightly colored abstract work she spotted on her morning walk four years ago on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Sotheby's auction house will be selling the work next month for the now-widowed original owner. "I would say it was an appointment with destiny," Gibson said in a telephone interview Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A major exhibition in two of Mexico's most prominent museums is honoring "70 years of creativity" from Mexico's best-known living artist, Rufino Tamayo. The 88-year-old artist said he planned for a much smaller exhibit until someone in the government learned about the plan and started the snowball rolling.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Police recovered 12 paintings by Rufino Tamayo, one of Mexico's foremost painters, that were stolen from an exhibition last week. The paintings--valued at $2.5 million--were in black plastic bags when police found them during a raid at a Mexico City apartment complex, a police official said. He said the suspects fled and no arrests were made. The paintings' authenticity was confirmed by a curator from the Lopez Quiroga gallery, where the robbery took place Thursday.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico put out an international alert for 12 paintings by Rufino Tamayo, one of the country's most famous artists, that were stolen from an exhibition last week. Pictures of the stolen pieces--worth about $2 million--were sent out by the Mexico branch of Interpol to the international police agency's branches worldwide. Police said five men with guns drawn entered a Mexico City gallery Thursday and pulled the paintings off the walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2007 | Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- A painting stolen 20 years ago was found lying in trash along a street, and now it could fetch up to $1 million at auction. Elizabeth Gibson didn't know anything about the brightly colored abstract work she spotted on her morning walk four years ago on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Sotheby's auction house will be selling the work next month for the now-widowed original owner. "I would say it was an appointment with destiny," Gibson said in a telephone interview Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Almost halfway through "Tamayo: A Modern Icon Reinterpreted," the comprehensive painting retrospective at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, there's a work of modest size that fuses the Mexican Modernist's unmistakable brilliance with his undeniable limitations. Intense, deeply personal, beautifully drafted and painted with a complex color sense that just won't quit, it also seems almost formulaic. Rufino Tamayo was an extravagantly gifted draftsman and colorist.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | Andy Brumer, Special to The Times
The Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach is currently a study in the abstract and the concrete. Inside, a retrospective exhibition looks at Rufino Tamayo, one of Mexico's greatest 20th century painters, who employed abstracted forms in an attempt to break down the barriers of the imagination. Outside, workers are constructing two new gallery spaces, a sculpture garden and an educational area that will allow the museum to expand its offerings by summer.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | ABEL SALAS
In its day, the 1928 Spanish Colonial mansion at 5300 E. Olympic Blvd. has been home to a plumbing supply company, a DMV office, the California Highway Patrol and a cadre of Chicano Brown Beret activists. But after 16 years as Tamayo Restaurant, a tony restaurant-meets-museum, the Eastside landmark seems to be settling into the role of a lifetime.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Police recovered 12 paintings by Rufino Tamayo, one of Mexico's foremost painters, that were stolen from an exhibition last week. The paintings--valued at $2.5 million--were in black plastic bags when police found them during a raid at a Mexico City apartment complex, a police official said. He said the suspects fled and no arrests were made. The paintings' authenticity was confirmed by a curator from the Lopez Quiroga gallery, where the robbery took place Thursday.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico put out an international alert for 12 paintings by Rufino Tamayo, one of the country's most famous artists, that were stolen from an exhibition last week. Pictures of the stolen pieces--worth about $2 million--were sent out by the Mexico branch of Interpol to the international police agency's branches worldwide. Police said five men with guns drawn entered a Mexico City gallery Thursday and pulled the paintings off the walls.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | ABEL SALAS
In its day, the 1928 Spanish Colonial mansion at 5300 E. Olympic Blvd. has been home to a plumbing supply company, a DMV office, the California Highway Patrol and a cadre of Chicano Brown Beret activists. But after 16 years as Tamayo Restaurant, a tony restaurant-meets-museum, the Eastside landmark seems to be settling into the role of a lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2007 | From the Associated Press
An abstract masterpiece by a Mexican artist that was found in the trash by a woman who knew little about modern art has been sold for more than $1 million. The painting, "Tres Personajes," by Rufino Tamayo, was discovered in 2003 by Elizabeth Gibson, who spotted it on her morning walk on Manhattan's Upper West Side. She took it home because, she said, "Even though I didn't understand it, I knew it had power."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In 1921, Rufino Tamayo got a job as head of the ethnographic department at the National Museum of Archaeology in Mexico City. Dissatisfied with his rigidly traditional, European-style training in drawing and painting at what was then known as the Academia de Arte de San Carlos, he had left school in search of the kind of aesthetic authenticity he had always felt as a kid, growing up in the shadow of Monte Alban in the southern city of Oaxaca.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Rufino Tamayo, who gained international fame for incorporating the bright colors and motifs of Mexican folk art into distinctly modern works, died Monday at a Mexico City hospital. He was 91. Tamayo was hospitalized June 12 with pneumonia and had been listed in serious condition since then. Friends said his health had been failing since he underwent open heart surgery in Houston nearly two years ago and that for months he had been unable to paint.
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