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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A 37-year-old pacu fish and icon to tiki fans  has found a home after nearly a year of living in a closed Rosemead restaurant.  The property's current owners decided Monday they would keep Rufus and build him a new aquarium in the Chinese restaurant they plan to open. Charles Ye, a spokesman for the owners, said they decided to keep Rufus to help decorate the restaurant. They also feared moving him would be harmful to his health.  "He's 37 years old already," Ye said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
Among the revivals and West Coast premieres that dominate our theatrical offerings, the startling phrase “world premiere” implies an exhilarating, possibly risky novelty: You can't help expecting pyrotechnics. But Rachel Bonds' “Five Mile Lake,” receiving its world premiere at South Coast Repertory, is a small, quiet play in which nothing particularly momentous happens. In fact, you may forget you're watching a play at all, and that the people in whose every fleeting expression you have become so deeply absorbed are actors reciting memorized lines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
MUSIC The singer-songwriters Rufus and Martha Wainwright have taken fairly opposite approaches to their careers — Rufus going all-in on grandiose, operatic piano works and Martha sticking to modest, lacerating folk. But the two siblings and children of Loudon Wainwright III team up for a night that showcases their camaraderie in an intimate setting. Pappy & Harriets, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown. 7 p.m. Fri. http://www.ticketweb.com.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Kari Howard
Have you ever seen a music video with a story so compelling, so moving, you don't even really hear the song the first time you see it? That just happened to me with the video to “New York Morning,”  the new song by the British band Elbow. Like a five-minute documentary, it tells the story of Dennis and Lois, two of New York City's biggest music fans. They've seen it all, from the glory days of CBGB and the Ramones to Britpop bands like Happy Mondays (who even wrote a song about them )
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
Among the revivals and West Coast premieres that dominate our theatrical offerings, the startling phrase “world premiere” implies an exhilarating, possibly risky novelty: You can't help expecting pyrotechnics. But Rachel Bonds' “Five Mile Lake,” receiving its world premiere at South Coast Repertory, is a small, quiet play in which nothing particularly momentous happens. In fact, you may forget you're watching a play at all, and that the people in whose every fleeting expression you have become so deeply absorbed are actors reciting memorized lines.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Kari Howard
Have you ever seen a music video with a story so compelling, so moving, you don't even really hear the song the first time you see it? That just happened to me with the video to “New York Morning,”  the new song by the British band Elbow. Like a five-minute documentary, it tells the story of Dennis and Lois, two of New York City's biggest music fans. They've seen it all, from the glory days of CBGB and the Ramones to Britpop bands like Happy Mondays (who even wrote a song about them )
NEWS
October 5, 1996
Rufus Youngblood, 72, the Secret Service agent who threw himself on top of Lyndon B. Johnson during the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Youngblood was assigned to Johnson from 1961 to 1966. During the November 1963 presidential trip to Dallas, he and Johnson rode two cars behind Kennedy's. Youngblood heard the shots, turned from the front seat, pulled Johnson to the floor, shouted "Get down!" and then half-sat and half-sprawled on top of the vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2003 | Robert Hilburn; Steve Hochman; Soren Baker; Steve Appleford
Rufus Wainwright "Want You" (DreamWorks) **** This New Yorker seemed so obscenely ambitious and endlessly talented in his 1998 debut album that even a listless, undernourished follow-up three years later couldn't shake your belief in him. In that second album, "Poses," Wainwright seemed so enamored with the romantic singer-songwriter lifestyle and so certain of his musical gifts that he forgot that an artist needs the discipline to apply that talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013
Rufus Wainwright is a virtuoso ironist, and he came right out of the gate with it at a recent Orpheum show. For the a cappella opener "Candles," he sang, "I tried to do all that I can, but the churches have run out of candles," while surrounded by dozens of lighted votives. When the lights kicked on, Wainwright was wearing gold pants and cheap sunglasses befitting a Serbian drug runner. Try as he might, be can't be austere for too long without winking. Wainwright's new Mark Ronson-produced album, "Out of the Game," was welcomed as a warm and spritzy return to form after a long stretch of operatic and quite serious records.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Rufus Norris, who began his career as an actor before turning to directing, has been tapped to succeed Nicholas Hytner as the new director of Britain's presitigious National Theatre. Norris is expected to assume his new role when Hytner steps down at the end of March 2015. The National Theatre has grown in international prominence in recent years with its digital broadcasts to cinemas around the world. The London company's NT Live series has broadcast such high-profile productions as "Frankenstein," with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller; "Macbeth" with Kenneth Branagh; and "The Audience," with Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II. CHEATSHEET: Fall arts preview 2013 Norris will be the National Theatre' sixth artistic director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A 37-year-old pacu fish and icon to tiki fans  has found a home after nearly a year of living in a closed Rosemead restaurant.  The property's current owners decided Monday they would keep Rufus and build him a new aquarium in the Chinese restaurant they plan to open. Charles Ye, a spokesman for the owners, said they decided to keep Rufus to help decorate the restaurant. They also feared moving him would be harmful to his health.  "He's 37 years old already," Ye said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Rufus Norris, who began his career as an actor before turning to directing, has been tapped to succeed Nicholas Hytner as the new director of Britain's presitigious National Theatre. Norris is expected to assume his new role when Hytner steps down at the end of March 2015. The National Theatre has grown in international prominence in recent years with its digital broadcasts to cinemas around the world. The London company's NT Live series has broadcast such high-profile productions as "Frankenstein," with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller; "Macbeth" with Kenneth Branagh; and "The Audience," with Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II. CHEATSHEET: Fall arts preview 2013 Norris will be the National Theatre' sixth artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
After memorably bringing to life a rogue's gallery of knaves, villains, scamps and ne'er-do-wells in films such as 1982's "Made in Britain," Quentin Tarantino's 1994 "Pulp Fiction," 1995's "Rob Roy," for which he earned an Oscar nomination, and 2008's "The Incredible Hulk," it's bit of a shock to discover Tim Roth is just a softie. On a recent hot summer's day, Roth, 52, is enjoying a glass of water at an outside table at his favorite British pub in Pasadena, where he lives out of the glare of Hollywood with his wife and two teenage sons.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013
Rufus Wainwright is a virtuoso ironist, and he came right out of the gate with it at a recent Orpheum show. For the a cappella opener "Candles," he sang, "I tried to do all that I can, but the churches have run out of candles," while surrounded by dozens of lighted votives. When the lights kicked on, Wainwright was wearing gold pants and cheap sunglasses befitting a Serbian drug runner. Try as he might, be can't be austere for too long without winking. Wainwright's new Mark Ronson-produced album, "Out of the Game," was welcomed as a warm and spritzy return to form after a long stretch of operatic and quite serious records.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By Margaret Wappler, Special to the Los Angeles Times
What happens when an indie balladeer with a love for opera sets out to make a true pop album? Singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright decided to find out. Much to the relief of Wainwright's fan base, going pop doesn't mean dropping the piano or enlisting Skrillex to refashion his soft touch into crossover club anthems. Instead, the Canadian American artist who debuted in 1998 with vibrato-soaked ballads and later cemented his reputation with playful odes to vices like cigarettes and chocolate milk, called on one of pop's most stylish producers to helm his seventh solo album, "Out of the Game.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
MUSIC The singer-songwriters Rufus and Martha Wainwright have taken fairly opposite approaches to their careers — Rufus going all-in on grandiose, operatic piano works and Martha sticking to modest, lacerating folk. But the two siblings and children of Loudon Wainwright III team up for a night that showcases their camaraderie in an intimate setting. Pappy & Harriets, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown. 7 p.m. Fri. http://www.ticketweb.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Classical music is often maligned for its apparent insistence that aspiring acolytes display proper credentials before becoming a true follower. Once admitted to the fold, you must bow to the altar of knowledge and denounce uncomplicated pleasure as the ultimate blasphemy. No matter what denomination you choose (chamber music, new music, opera, orchestra), you can be sure the repertoire is studded with landmines, the detonation of which will instantly out you as a Philistine or worse: not serious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rufus Thomas, 84, a singer whose "Bear Cat" helped Sun Records get its start before Elvis Presley signed with the company, died Saturday at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., where he had been confined with an undisclosed illness since Thanksgiving. Born in Cayce, Miss., and reared in Memphis, Thomas began tap dancing on the streets there for tips and performed in amateur shows in high school. In the 1940s, he ran his own Beale Street amateur show, which attracted B.B.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Detective stories are largely a matter of dressing, of seasoning; of putting flesh on the bones of the whodunit, of coloring between the lines. They are as much or more about the who, the where and the when as they are about the how and the why: The English manor house or the American mean street, the dandified Belgian or the medieval monk. There are, after all, only so many reasons people kill one another — murder being the subject of most all mysteries — and only so many ways to do it, and Agatha Christie has already used them all. And so every detective story is a kind of travelogue too. "Zen," which begins Sunday night as a presentation of PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery," takes us to Italy, and not some remote, movie-magical evocation of the place, but the place itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Classical music is often maligned for its apparent insistence that aspiring acolytes display proper credentials before becoming a true follower. Once admitted to the fold, you must bow to the altar of knowledge and denounce uncomplicated pleasure as the ultimate blasphemy. No matter what denomination you choose (chamber music, new music, opera, orchestra), you can be sure the repertoire is studded with landmines, the detonation of which will instantly out you as a Philistine or worse: not serious.
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