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October 21, 2007 | Dylan Hernandez; Bob Mieszerski, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Africa won its second Rugby World Cup by beating defending champion England, 15-6, Saturday at Saint Denis, France, in a final where all the points came on penalty kicks. Percy Montgomery was four for four on kicks for South Africa, Francois Steyn added another, and Jonny Wilkinson had two for England. "I'm sitting here and trying not to cry," Springboks captain John Smit said. "It's a feeling you can't put into words. It's a reward for four years of dedication and hard work.
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WORLD
June 10, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
"At exactly 12 o'clock for five minutes, stop what you are doing, get out your vuvuzela and blow on it like never before. If you are in the car, hoot. And let the sound be heard from Cape to Mpumalanga and from Natal to Limpopo." — one of many calls on the Internet for South Africans to blow their horns Wednesday It began as a vuvuzela "moment": five minutes, to be precise, when South Africans would walk outside and blast their vuvuzelas , plastic trumpets blown at sporting events that are either obnoxious or exhilarating, depending on your point of view.
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SPORTS
September 13, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
BRIGHTON, England -- The United States, a minnow in English parlance, ached to become at least a guppy but remains a bummed-out minnow. It's ruthless in the rugby sea, as reiterated across the Channel in France on Wednesday, when some strapping Pacific islanders from Tonga ate the U.S., 25-15, in the Americans' second match of the Rugby World Cup.
SPORTS
June 7, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa -- One of the more gripping scenes in the 2009 movie "Invictus" shows a South African Airways jumbo jet buzzing the top of a packed Johannesburg stadium just minutes before the start of the championship match of the 1995 Rugby World Cup. Inspired by the good-luck message stenciled on the plane's wings, South Africa goes on to win the game in one of the sport's biggest upsets. Cut to credits. It didn't quite happen the way it was depicted, said Laurie Kay, the retired pilot who was at the controls of the 747 that day. But if the airline can get approval from FIFA, soccer's governing body, the stunt may be reprised Friday afternoon when South Africa opens soccer's World Cup against heavily favored Mexico.
SPORTS
October 28, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Australia beat New Zealand, 16-6, in the Rugby World Cup semifinals at Dublin, Ireland. Australia will play England for the championship.
SPORTS
June 7, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa -- One of the more gripping scenes in the 2009 movie "Invictus" shows a South African Airways jumbo jet buzzing the top of a packed Johannesburg stadium just minutes before the start of the championship match of the 1995 Rugby World Cup. Inspired by the good-luck message stenciled on the plane's wings, South Africa goes on to win the game in one of the sport's biggest upsets. Cut to credits. It didn't quite happen the way it was depicted, said Laurie Kay, the retired pilot who was at the controls of the 747 that day. But if the airline can get approval from FIFA, soccer's governing body, the stunt may be reprised Friday afternoon when South Africa opens soccer's World Cup against heavily favored Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2009
Wishing she were off his website Regarding the piece on Mr. Skin ["Mr. Skin Pursues Naked Enthusiasm," Dec. 6]: Maybe Jim McBride can lie to himself about what he does to women, but can he lie to his daughter? This puff piece on such a piece of work as Jim McBride makes me queasy. I want to ask Jim how he would feel if his daughter was to be put on his site without her approval or consent. As an actress on his site, I have asked repeatedly to be taken off and tried to take legal action but to no avail.
SPORTS
September 7, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
LONDON -- It's a trick to coax American sports fans into any kind of solidarity with New Zealand, especially when polls show that 92% of American sports fans remain unaware of the existence of New Zealand. Actually, polls don't really show that, but it's half-plausible given the American geography ineptitude that worries Miss Teen USA question-writers, and given that Auckland sits so far from Los Angeles (6,508 miles) that flying there makes you literally two days older.
SPORTS
July 3, 2000
BRAZIL * Host cities: Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Porto Alegre, Brasilia, Goiania, Fortaleza, Salvador, Curitiba, Recife, Maceio, Manaus, Belem, Sao Luis. * Stadiums: 14 existing, including 12 with capacity exceeding 50,000. Rio de Janeiro's Maracana stadium, the world's largest, is undergoing a $35-million remodeling, and capacity will be reduced to 90,000. * Bid cost: Not disclosed * Projected budget: Not disclosed * Arguments for: The world's No.
SPORTS
November 1, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
More than 30 prizefights including one involving former heavyweight champ George Foreman have been fixed or tainted with fraud in the last 12 years, the Miami Herald reported Sunday. Some fighters took payments to throw fights while others took dives to avoid injury and earn a quick paycheck, the newspaper reported, citing interviews with participants in the fights. Onetime world-ranked heavyweight Tony Fulilangi said he faked a second-round knockout by Foreman on Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2009 | By Alexandra Zavis
When President Nelson Mandela strode onto the field at the final of the 1995 Rugby World Cup wearing the shirt of the largely white national team, the entire stadium appeared to catch its breath. To millions of black South Africans, the green shirt with its springbok emblem had come to embody all the pain and indignities of decades of white rule. But with that one gesture, Mandela reassured the sport's largely white fans, many of whom had thought of him as a terrorist, that they too had a place in the new South Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2009
Wishing she were off his website Regarding the piece on Mr. Skin ["Mr. Skin Pursues Naked Enthusiasm," Dec. 6]: Maybe Jim McBride can lie to himself about what he does to women, but can he lie to his daughter? This puff piece on such a piece of work as Jim McBride makes me queasy. I want to ask Jim how he would feel if his daughter was to be put on his site without her approval or consent. As an actress on his site, I have asked repeatedly to be taken off and tried to take legal action but to no avail.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Just 20 years ago, South Africa was commonly perceived as one of the most polarized, ill-starred places on the planet. Shackled by the racist system of apartheid, or legally enforced segregation, it was a nation divided against itself and shunned by the rest of the world as a pariah state. Today the world is looking at South Africa for very different reasons. This summer the country will become the first African nation to host the World Cup soccer tournament. As one of the most politically stable, democratic and relatively prosperous countries on a troubled continent, South Africa is regarded as a model by many of its neighbors.
SPORTS
October 21, 2007 | Dylan Hernandez; Bob Mieszerski, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Africa won its second Rugby World Cup by beating defending champion England, 15-6, Saturday at Saint Denis, France, in a final where all the points came on penalty kicks. Percy Montgomery was four for four on kicks for South Africa, Francois Steyn added another, and Jonny Wilkinson had two for England. "I'm sitting here and trying not to cry," Springboks captain John Smit said. "It's a feeling you can't put into words. It's a reward for four years of dedication and hard work.
SPORTS
October 19, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
LONDON -- Our hemisphere so totally rocks, holding its own against that mouthy other hemisphere. For four solid weeks, we had to listen to that other, Southern Hemisphere deride our excellent, Northern Hemisphere, as novice rugby observers learned that rugby people actually sit around and quibble over which hemisphere rules. This hurt hemispherically, because among the rugged pursuits of the species, rugby pretty much makes the NFL look like high tea at the Ritz-Carlton.
SPORTS
September 13, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
BRIGHTON, England -- The United States, a minnow in English parlance, ached to become at least a guppy but remains a bummed-out minnow. It's ruthless in the rugby sea, as reiterated across the Channel in France on Wednesday, when some strapping Pacific islanders from Tonga ate the U.S., 25-15, in the Americans' second match of the Rugby World Cup.
WORLD
June 10, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
"At exactly 12 o'clock for five minutes, stop what you are doing, get out your vuvuzela and blow on it like never before. If you are in the car, hoot. And let the sound be heard from Cape to Mpumalanga and from Natal to Limpopo." — one of many calls on the Internet for South Africans to blow their horns Wednesday It began as a vuvuzela "moment": five minutes, to be precise, when South Africans would walk outside and blast their vuvuzelas , plastic trumpets blown at sporting events that are either obnoxious or exhilarating, depending on your point of view.
SPORTS
February 15, 2004 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
Overhead, the White Stripes' "Seven Nation Army" came booming out over the Home Depot Center's sound system. In the stands below, a 16-nation party was underway. Samoa supporters were singing. Fiji fans were flag-waving. And in various pockets of relative repression throughout the stadium, Americans were anxiously waiting, and nervously hoping, to see if the home team might actually score before sundown.
SPORTS
September 7, 2007 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
LONDON -- It's a trick to coax American sports fans into any kind of solidarity with New Zealand, especially when polls show that 92% of American sports fans remain unaware of the existence of New Zealand. Actually, polls don't really show that, but it's half-plausible given the American geography ineptitude that worries Miss Teen USA question-writers, and given that Auckland sits so far from Los Angeles (6,508 miles) that flying there makes you literally two days older.
SPORTS
May 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Barring a stunning upset, South Africa today should be awarded the right to stage the World Cup in 2010. On Friday, Tunisia withdrew its bid, leaving only the South Africans, along with Egypt, Libya and Morocco, fighting to play host to international soccer's quadrennial world championship. South Africa called on some powerful political figures in its final effort to persuade FIFA's executive committee to vote in its favor.
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