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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1985 | From Associated Press
A 3-year-old boy shot his 18-month-old sister to death Friday with a high-powered rifle his parents owned for protection, authorities said. Colleen Abatti was shot in the head with a .243-caliber Ruger that her mother had loaded and left in the living room after hearing noises outside the home Thursday night, San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Deputy John Hastie said.
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NATIONAL
January 14, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Joe Zamudio was out buying cigarettes last Saturday when he heard what sounded like fireworks but quickly realized were gunshots. He reached into his coat pocket for the 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol he carried, clicking the safety off. He heard yelling around him: "Shooter, shooter, get down!" Zamudio saw a young man squirming on the ground and an older man standing above him, waving a gun. Zamudio, 24, had his finger on the trigger and seconds to decide. He lifted his finger from the trigger and ran toward the struggling men. As he grabbed the older man's wrist to wrestle the gun away, bystanders yelled that he had the wrong man ?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The mayor is speaking out against special-issue rifles that carry the city's name. The .22-caliber Ruger is engraved with a stagecoach and "City of Elk Grove Special Edition." It's one of several guns marketed by a Colorado company to specific communities. "I'm livid," Mayor Sophia Scherman said. "This is a total misappropriation of the name of our city." Only 26 of the $599 rifles have been made, said Bill Daley, marketing director for Investment Arms in Fort Collins, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The mayor is speaking out against special-issue rifles that carry the city's name. The .22-caliber Ruger is engraved with a stagecoach and "City of Elk Grove Special Edition." It's one of several guns marketed by a Colorado company to specific communities. "I'm livid," Mayor Sophia Scherman said. "This is a total misappropriation of the name of our city." Only 26 of the $599 rifles have been made, said Bill Daley, marketing director for Investment Arms in Fort Collins, Colo.
NEWS
September 6, 1994
Chipping a gold ball in from five feet of the green. Hanging on to my '73 Suzuki over 10 miles of punishing trail. Hitting a topspin lob to the base line while my opponent stands at the net. Brewing a better dark ale than anything I could buy in a store. Getting a bull's-eye at 50 yards with my Ruger .22. Playing a great chess match, whether I win or lose. Carrying a 40-pound backpack over a 12,000-foot pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1986 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
The daughter of one of two Dana Point women who allegedly hired an Alabama team of would-be mercenaries in the firebombing of two cars last August testified in federal court Wednesday that she would be scared and might flee if the two defendants were released on bail. "I probably won't be around," Shirley Ruth Wright, 28, told a detention hearing for her mother, Charlotte Ruth Wyckoff, 51, and Elizabeth Leta Hamilton, 39.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | SCOTT HARRIS
Of all the couples who've ever spoken about leaving Los Angeles for the promise of a better, safer life elsewhere, the Hackmeyers seemed excellent candidates to actually do it. For one thing, their roots are back East. Paul is from Boston and Nancy is from Philadelphia. Plus, their work is portable and highly compensated. He's an ob-gyn, she's a lawyer. And, considering the way L.A. has treated them, they would have better motives than most.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William B. Ruger, a flinty entrepreneur who turned a childhood fascination with guns into the nation's largest firearms manufacturing company, died Saturday at his home in Prescott, Ariz. His death at 86 came after a period of declining health. Ruger was co-founder and chairman emeritus of Sturm, Ruger & Co. of Connecticut, a manufacturer admired by sportsmen and collectors since it began selling pistols in 1949.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | JIM CARRIER, Carrier is a reporter for the Denver Post. and
It was a miserable day to be pregnant. Hot, humid, late in July, 1987. Afternoon thunderheads teased the mountains to the east of the city, and even skinny people sweated. Had it not been for motherhood, Darci Pierce and Cindy Ray might never have met on a broiling blacktop parking lot outside an obstetrics clinic. On this day, particularly, it was no place for a mother to be.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | DAVID MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He insists it is not his fault. Yes, William B. Ruger designed the P-89 semiautomatic pistol. And yes, when Colin Ferguson strafed a Long Island commuter train last December, killing six and wounding 17, his weapon was a P-89 semiautomatic pistol. But no, Ruger maintains, he is not to blame. "The world knows it's not our fault," said the 78-year-old founder of Sturm, Ruger & Co., one of the country's largest firearms makers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William B. Ruger, a flinty entrepreneur who turned a childhood fascination with guns into the nation's largest firearms manufacturing company, died Saturday at his home in Prescott, Ariz. His death at 86 came after a period of declining health. Ruger was co-founder and chairman emeritus of Sturm, Ruger & Co. of Connecticut, a manufacturer admired by sportsmen and collectors since it began selling pistols in 1949.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | SCOTT HARRIS
Of all the couples who've ever spoken about leaving Los Angeles for the promise of a better, safer life elsewhere, the Hackmeyers seemed excellent candidates to actually do it. For one thing, their roots are back East. Paul is from Boston and Nancy is from Philadelphia. Plus, their work is portable and highly compensated. He's an ob-gyn, she's a lawyer. And, considering the way L.A. has treated them, they would have better motives than most.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | DAVID MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He insists it is not his fault. Yes, William B. Ruger designed the P-89 semiautomatic pistol. And yes, when Colin Ferguson strafed a Long Island commuter train last December, killing six and wounding 17, his weapon was a P-89 semiautomatic pistol. But no, Ruger maintains, he is not to blame. "The world knows it's not our fault," said the 78-year-old founder of Sturm, Ruger & Co., one of the country's largest firearms makers.
NEWS
September 6, 1994
Chipping a gold ball in from five feet of the green. Hanging on to my '73 Suzuki over 10 miles of punishing trail. Hitting a topspin lob to the base line while my opponent stands at the net. Brewing a better dark ale than anything I could buy in a store. Getting a bull's-eye at 50 yards with my Ruger .22. Playing a great chess match, whether I win or lose. Carrying a 40-pound backpack over a 12,000-foot pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1986 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
The daughter of one of two Dana Point women who allegedly hired an Alabama team of would-be mercenaries in the firebombing of two cars last August testified in federal court Wednesday that she would be scared and might flee if the two defendants were released on bail. "I probably won't be around," Shirley Ruth Wright, 28, told a detention hearing for her mother, Charlotte Ruth Wyckoff, 51, and Elizabeth Leta Hamilton, 39.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1985 | From Associated Press
A 3-year-old boy shot his 18-month-old sister to death Friday with a high-powered rifle his parents owned for protection, authorities said. Colleen Abatti was shot in the head with a .243-caliber Ruger that her mother had loaded and left in the living room after hearing noises outside the home Thursday night, San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Deputy John Hastie said.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
Joe Zamudio was out buying cigarettes last Saturday when he heard what sounded like fireworks but quickly realized were gunshots. He reached into his coat pocket for the 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol he carried, clicking the safety off. He heard yelling around him: "Shooter, shooter, get down!" Zamudio saw a young man squirming on the ground and an older man standing above him, waving a gun. Zamudio, 24, had his finger on the trigger and seconds to decide. He lifted his finger from the trigger and ran toward the struggling men. As he grabbed the older man's wrist to wrestle the gun away, bystanders yelled that he had the wrong man ?
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