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Rui Xingwen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rui Xingwen, 78, a former propaganda chief in the Chinese government, who was demoted after the 1989 crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square, died June 5 of heart failure. Rui was a reformer who briefly relaxed controls on the news media. He was closely associated with deposed Communist Party leader Zhao Ziyang, who was placed under house arrest after sympathizing with students who had occupied the square. Zhao died in January.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rui Xingwen, 78, a former propaganda chief in the Chinese government, who was demoted after the 1989 crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square, died June 5 of heart failure. Rui was a reformer who briefly relaxed controls on the news media. He was closely associated with deposed Communist Party leader Zhao Ziyang, who was placed under house arrest after sympathizing with students who had occupied the square. Zhao died in January.
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NEWS
June 2, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three reformist Chinese leaders ousted from power two years ago have been given vice ministerial posts in what amounts to partial rehabilitation, official media announced Saturday. Most prominent of the three is Hu Qili, 62, a former member of the policy-setting Politburo Standing Committee. In the mid-1980s, Hu was viewed by many Chinese and foreign observers as a likely future head of the Communist Party.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three reformist Chinese leaders ousted from power two years ago have been given vice ministerial posts in what amounts to partial rehabilitation, official media announced Saturday. Most prominent of the three is Hu Qili, 62, a former member of the policy-setting Politburo Standing Committee. In the mid-1980s, Hu was viewed by many Chinese and foreign observers as a likely future head of the Communist Party.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
China's Communist Party fired reformist General Secretary Zhao Ziyang on Saturday and replaced him with Shanghai party chief Jiang Zemin, a technocrat and political hard-liner. The appointment of Jiang, 62, as the new head of the 47-million-member party marks an attempt by Chinese leaders, in the wake of weeks of political turmoil, to carry on with the basic policies of the past decade: economic modernization and openness to the outside world paired with unyielding political dictatorship.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Premier Zhao Ziyang was confirmed Monday as general secretary of China's Communist Party, leading a successor generation dominated by reformers into the top positions of political power. Zhao's mentor, senior leader Deng Xiaoping, 83, retained the chairmanship of the Central Military Commission, which is equivalent to being commander in chief of the armed forces. But Zhao, 68, in a key step toward consolidating his power, was named vice chairman of the commission.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Hu Yaobang, second in command to Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, resigned Friday as the head of the world's largest Communist party after the party leadership announced that he had confessed to "mistakes on major issues of political principles." The Communist Party said that Premier Zhao Ziyang will become the party's "acting general secretary." No replacement for Zhao was announced Friday, but a selection could be made within the next few days.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
China's Communist Party fired reformist General Secretary Zhao Ziyang on Saturday and replaced him with Shanghai party chief Jiang Zemin, a technocrat and political hard-liner. The appointment of Jiang, 62, as the new head of the 47-million-member party marks an attempt by Chinese leaders, in the wake of weeks of political turmoil, to carry on with the basic policies of the past decade: economic modernization and openness to the outside world paired with unyielding political dictatorship.
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