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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | Glenn Whipp
Defiantly square and focus-group engineered to appeal to those harboring a soft spot for "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," the Nia Vardalos vehicle "My Life in Ruins" doesn't do Greece or its star many favors. Vardalos seems resigned to replicating the formula of her 2002 left-field hit and draining it dry. First, there was the seven-episode CBS sitcom "My Big Fat Greek Life."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2014 | By Noel Murray
Sorcerer Warner Bros., $12.95; Blu-ray, $27.98 Director William Friedkin was riding the hot streak of "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist" when he attempted his most ambitious project to that point: a remake of Henri-Georges Clouzot's brilliant 1953 French thriller "The Wages of Fear," about four desperate men hired to transport trucks full of explosive nitroglycerin up bumpy mountain roads. Friedkin's "Sorcerer" was a big enough flop to slow his career momentum considerably, and legal complications kept the film off DVD and Blu-ray - until now. The movie that many consider one of the most neglected masterpieces of the 1970s "New Hollywood" era has finally been restored and is able to be widely seen again.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2000
The photograph on your Feb. 7 front page of the ruins of Grozny had a profound effect on me impossible to explain. The ruins of Grozny reminded me of drawings and pictures I have seen of the ruins of ancient civilizations by past artists showing the destruction of centuries--Athens, Rome, monasteries in England, fallen castles, almost-concealed vine-covered walls of abandoned cottages in Ireland. But the ruins of Grozny are recent and reveal the growing ability to destroy something in a short time that has taken decades to build.
WORLD
April 16, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
MAALOULA, Syria - From the debris-strewn front garden of the Safir Hotel, Syrian military commanders barked orders to troops taking cover in the smoke-shrouded maze of streets below. "If you hear any movement, throw hand grenades immediately!" a general advised on his two-way radio as he peered at the battle unfolding like a distant video game at the bottom of the hill. On Tuesday, Syrian forces were targeting the remnants of a rebel force in this historic town, long a center of Christian worship and pilgrimage.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Deep in the jungles of Mexico, scientists have discovered a Maya city, complete with signs of pyramids, remnants of palace buildings and ball courts. This hidden archeological gem, named Chactún (which means “red stone” or “great stone”) was described by the country's National Institute of Anthropology and History. “It's a total gap in the archeological map of the Maya area,” Slovenian archaeologist Ivan Sprajc, who led the team, said in a taped interview in Spanish.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Detroiters may despise the ruins that surround them, but the hundreds - if not thousands - of tourists who come to see the derelict buildings say the experience helps them understand the Motor City. There are hundreds of buildings to explore: Jesse Welter, the photographer and urban explorer featured in a Los Angeles Times story , calls the city "an amusement park. " Cindy Lindow has gone on 22 tours with Welter. She lives in St. Clair, about 50 miles north of Detroit, but grew up in the city and has some nostalgia for the way it used to be. Her uncle was a priest in a church she has toured.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | Vicki Torres and John Johnson, Times Staff Writers
It was, as always, the most fickle of catastrophes, bestowing death with nature's cold caprice: Fifteen from a stucco Northridge apartment building. Two from a million-dollar home in Sherman Oaks. One from Skid Row. One from the ranks of the Los Angeles police. Elizabeth Ann Brace, mother of two, was in her home in Rancho Cucamonga, 102 miles from the epicenter of Monday's Northridge quake. Death found her anyway. When she ran to check the baby, officials said, she apparently tripped on a toy, fell and dashed her skull against her child's crib.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
It's been a little more than 100 years since Yale University professor Hiram Bingham III first saw the ancient Incan ruins at Machu Picchu. Since then, the high-elevation Peruvian village has become a tourist magnet, with some hiking the trails leading up to it and some arriving by train. Friendly Planet Travel offers a nine-day trip starting and ending in Lima that visits Cusco, the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu. Participants spend three days touring the ancient area before flying to Iguazu Falls on the border of Argentina and Brazil .  The deal: Sensational South America offers a $400 early-bird discount for reservations made by Aug. 8. After that date, prices for the package tour increase to $3,299 a person.
SPORTS
March 11, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Way to go Steve Stricker. Way to ruin the PGA Tour for everyone else. As you may have heard, Tiger Woods won the PGA Tour tournament in Doral, Fla., on Sunday. The main reason he won was because of his outstanding putting. Woods putted 100 times in the 72-hole tournament, the best he has ever done (which is saying a lot, considering this is Tiger Woods we are talking about). He also made 27 birdies, the second-best total of his career. All because of his superior putting, a facet of his game that had failed him over the last couple of years, when Woods seemed mortal again.
SPORTS
September 29, 2010
Bottom Ten contender Nevada Las Vegas was caught looking ahead. The Runnin' Rubble, confidently anticipating a big shellacking by undefeated Nevada this weekend, forgot they also had to lose to New Mexico last Saturday. Instead, the Rubble emerged victorious, 45-10, thereby ruining their chances for a winless season. UNLV (1-3) fell to No. 11 while the No. 1 Lost Lobos of New Mexico (0-4) solidified their lead. No. 2 Western Kentucky (0-4) is idle this week ? it's been pretty idle even when it plays ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
INDEPENDENCE, Calif. - One by one, a parade of Owens Valley residents rose at a public hearing Tuesday to assail the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's plan to meet its renewable energy goals by covering 2 square miles of high desert with 1 million solar panels. "We believe in economic development - but this is not the kind we want," Jane McDonald, who helps run a farmer's market, said at the DWP's first public presentation of the project during an Inyo County Board of Supervisors hearing.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2014
Stunning photos and report on the Anasazi ruins of Cedar Mesa, Utah ["Rock of Ages" by David Kelly, Feb. 16]. Thank you. I went to Natural Bridges National Monument; now I'll go back and explore more ruins. The drive on Highway 261 south off the edge of Cedar Mesa into Mexican Hat is not for the faint of heart. They're not kidding when they recommend 5 mph. Anne Eggebroten Santa Monica Trust your map, or your spouse? Regarding the Letters column ["Women Can Read Maps Just Fine," Feb. 16]
TRAVEL
February 14, 2014 | By David Kelly
BLUFF, Utah - Darkness was falling like a starry curtain as I pulled into this dusty town along the San Juan River. It was mid-November, and a cold wind was blowing in from the desert. The lights of a lone café illuminated a sign ahead. "Bluff, Utah Est. 650 AD. " My search had led me here, to a place where American history stretches deep into antiquity. I was chasing the Anasazi, Navajo for "Ancient Ones," the mysterious people who occupied these harsh lands from the 12th century BC until vanishing 700 years ago. I'd stood in their magnificent Great Houses in Chaco Canyon, N.M., and palatial cliff dwellings in Mesa Verde, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
NBC didn't air the Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs choir covering“Get Lucky” or T.a.T.u's defiantly gay-friendly performance. But Friday night's telecast of the opening ceremony for the 22nd Winter Olympics in Sochi was an enthralling, if occasionally odd, swirl of East and West, old and new, strange and familiar. It was also a showcase for the increasingly aggrieved political subtext that threatens to overshadow the Games. All early coverage has been couched repeatedly in pejorative - for Russia's anti-gay laws, the expense of the facilities and shoddiness of accommodations; for the arrogance of the president and the joylessness of the population.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
There's so much that's authentic and likable about the loopy road trip comedy "Let's Ruin It With Babies" that it's a shame when it loses its mojo along the way. But half a loaf is better than none, especially when a movie stars an actress as amusing and beguiling as Kestrin Pantera (think Sandra Bullock meets Pat Benatar), who also wrote, directed and co-edited this shaggy-dog tale about a 30-ish hipster chick's hesitant coming-of-age. Babies - whether to have them, whether to wait - propels this brief film's slender, real-life-inspired plot involving Channing (Pantera)
NATIONAL
January 19, 2014 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The Rev. Charles Duplessis navigated the new landscape of the Lower 9th Ward, crossing from newly paved streets to those still muddy and rutted as riverbeds. He drove past a gleaming duplex designed by Frank Gehry and the skeletons of vacant homes, past a community garden and overgrown lots with "no dumping" signs, until he reached his destination: Flood Street. Here were more examples of the progress made after Hurricane Katrina -- and the problems that remain. Construction cranes hovered over a new community center taking shape nearby.
WORLD
January 16, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The woman wailed outside the ruins of the Notre Dame Cathedral of Port-au-Prince, the iconic Roman Catholic church that symbolized Haiti's religious fervor. "This is what God did!" she cried Friday morning. "See what God can do!" Tuesday's earthquake brought down the roof of the enormous pink-and-cream church, filling the apse and nave with tons of rubble. The quake punched out its vivid stained glass windows, twisted its wrought-iron fencing and sliced brick walls like cake.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
In one way, fires are a tragedy. In another, they are a ritual. And a ritual is often the acknowledgment of things that must be; changes, like birth and death, that will happen whether they are acknowledged or not. In her four-part environmental installation, "Feast of the Fires," Deborah Roundtree explores the notion of change by combining objects found among the ruins left by last year's Malibu fires with large color photographs.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Detroiters may despise the ruins that surround them, but the hundreds - if not thousands - of tourists who come to see the derelict buildings say the experience helps them understand the Motor City. There are hundreds of buildings to explore: Jesse Welter, the photographer and urban explorer featured in a Los Angeles Times story , calls the city "an amusement park. " Cindy Lindow has gone on 22 tours with Welter. She lives in St. Clair, about 50 miles north of Detroit, but grew up in the city and has some nostalgia for the way it used to be. Her uncle was a priest in a church she has toured.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
DETROIT - He'd heard stories of ruin and blight, but that didn't prepare Oliver Kearney for what he saw: Prostitutes roaming the streets at 8 a.m., rubble-strewn parking lots overrun with weeds, buildings taken over by bright pink graffiti, the message scrawled on blackboards in deserted schools: "I will not write in vacant buildings. " He took 2,000 photographs his first day. "No other American city has seen decline on this scale," Kearney said. "It's really a once-in-a-lifetime thing you're going to see. " And he saw it all on a tour.
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