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NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Changing the rules -- more than educational or other strategies -- has the best chance of making kids' hockey a safer sport, researchers said. "Rule changes essentially alter the culture of a sport and clearly define acceptable behavior for” players, parents, coaches and officials, the researchers wrote in an article published Monday in the Canadian Medical Assn. Journal. The article cited a study showing that the 2009-10 season saw an incidence of game-related concussions that was seven times higher than that in 1998-99.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Laura W. Brill
Last year's Proposition 8 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court changed the lives of many same-sex couples and their families in California for the better. But the political fallout from that decision is also having a profound and worrisome effect on the state's initiative process. The reason has to do with the nature of the court's action. The Supreme Court did not rule on the constitutionality of Proposition 8 itself. Rather, it decided an issue of standing, concluding that the initiative's backers had not been directly harmed by a lower-court ruling that the law was unconstitutional and that they therefore lacked standing to appeal that ruling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007
IN his column about press coverage of Paris Hilton ["Paris Isn't the Only One Guilty," May 12], Tim Rutten faulted the mainstream press for not pointing out that "the American criminal justice system does not punish one person to instruct others." Anyone who has observed the criminal courts in L.A. has seen punishments meted out for this reason on many occasions. The California Rules of Court that guide judges in fashioning sentences state, in Rule 4.410, that one of the "general objectives in sentencing" is "deterring others from criminal conduct by demonstrating its consequences."
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Given the danger posed by drunk or reckless drivers, police should follow up on information - even information from an anonymous source - that a vehicle might be careening down a street or threatening other motorists and pedestrians. If they confirm that is the case, they should stop the vehicle. But that isn't what happened in a California case decided by the Supreme Court last week. The court's ruling makes it too easy for police to stop motorists on the basis of an anonymous tip. In 2008, a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road, giving rise to a concern that the driver might be drunk.
SPORTS
April 5, 2003
The dumbest rule in sports, college basketball's "alternate possession rule," showed why it's so idiotic in the Kansas-Arizona West Regional final. With Kansas up, 78-75, and nine seconds left in the game, Arizona forced what used to be a jump ball. Instead the arrow was for Kansas, so Kansas got the ball out of bounds instead of losing it on a turnover. This makes no sense. Whenever the defense forces what used to be a jump ball, the ball should be awarded to the defensive team because it has done something right and the offense has done something wrong.
SPORTS
March 20, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
NFL owners voted Wednesday to approve all proposed rules changes, including the controversial crown-of-the-helmet rule, which seeks to eliminate the use of a helmet as a weapon. That rule passed, 31-1. The rule, which applies mainly to running backs, imposes a 15-yard penalty if a runner or tackler initiates forcible contact by delivering a blow with the top of his helmet when both players are clearly outside the tackle box. The tackle box is defined as an area extending from tackle to tackle and from three yards behind the line of scrimmage to the offensive team's end line.
SPORTS
March 17, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
The NHL's effort to fast-track a proposed rule that would punish blindside hits to the head was welcomed Wednesday by Kings Coach Terry Murray , who has seen many similar ideas stall over the years, and by Kings center Jeff Halpern , who could influence the final form of the rule as a member of the NHL's competition committee. General managers last week recommended banning hits that involve "a lateral, back-pressure or blindside hit to an opponent where the head is targeted."
SPORTS
March 17, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
A proposed rule that would punish blindside hits to the head could be adopted by the NHL within days, as league officials take extraordinary steps to accelerate adoption of a recommendation made last week by the 30 general managers. But because players and officials would have little time to adjust, the provision calling for a minor or major penalty for blows that are "lateral, back-pressure or blindside hits" to the head likely would not take effect until next season. For the rest of this season, those hits would be subject to review for possible suspension.
SPORTS
March 25, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
The NHL on Thursday implemented and immediately put into effect a rule that empowers its hockey operations department to review and possibly suspend any player who delivers a blow judged to be "a lateral, back-pressure or blind-side hit to an opponent where the head is targeted and/or the principal point of contact." The rule, which will be enforced starting with the 11 games on Thursday's schedule, was unanimously approved by the league's Board of Governors on Tuesday. It does not include language about penalties being imposed for such hits, though that's likely to be discussed this summer and could be added before next season.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - A new federal rule could give millions of home buyers insights they've never had before about a crucial element of their mortgage application: the appraisal, including the electronic cross-checks and reviews now used by lenders to determine the amount of the loan they'll approve. The new rule will also give buyers the time and ammunition they need to challenge appraisals that they suspect contain errors. Starting this weekend, lenders nationwide will be required to inform mortgage applicants that they can receive a free copy of whatever appraisals, reviews, computer valuations and other data are used in the transaction.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jon Healey
A common assumption underlying the Net neutrality debate is that broadband ISPs will impose tolls on content providers, and content providers will pass those costs on to consumers, if only the Federal Communications Commission lets them. Witness this passage from a piece in Friday's Los Angeles Times about the Net neutrality proposal being floated by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler: " 'It could create a tiered Internet where consumers either pay more for content and speed, or get left behind with fewer choices,' warned Delara Derakhshani, policy counsel for Consumers Union.
SPORTS
April 25, 2014 | From staff and wire reports
A clarification by Major League Baseball has determined that fielders attempting to turn a double play after forcing out a runner must have complete control of the ball in their glove, but the ball can be dropped after the player intentionally opens their glove for the transfer to the throwing hand. The use of instant replay this season caused the need for clarification by the rules committee, which MLB said has been agreed to by the players' association and umpires' union. Previously, some umpires ruled that the ball needed to at least be removed from the glove in a transfer attempt.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Shan Li and Lalita Clozel
A new federal proposal to regulate electronic cigarettes has Patrick Sanchez pondering the future of the fledgling industry. Sanchez is the owner of Vapegoat, a Highland Park e-cigarette shop that doubles as an art gallery. On a normal night, customers kick back on his comfy couches, surrounded by brick walls hung with Salvador Dali-esque paintings, and try out new e-cig flavors. Since opening in September, Sanchez said, business has boomed as more smokers discovered the battery-operated devices, which heat liquids that usually contain nicotine to create a vapor that can be inhaled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Zahniser
A grass-roots group that has been railing against Los Angeles' parking ticket policies has agreed to team up with Mayor Eric Garcetti to look at changes to the enforcement system. Steven Vincent, founder of the Los Angeles Parking Freedom Initiative, said Garcetti invited members of his organization to participate in an official city working group. The panel, Vincent said, will look at an array of possible changes, such as reducing certain fines, expanding parking hours in key locations, making no-parking signs less confusing and halting the practice of using ticket revenue as a tool to balance the city's budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
A day after hearing hours of impassioned testimony from a divided trucking industry, California air quality regulators on Friday postponed deadlines for aging heavy-duty trucks to comply with the nation's toughest diesel air pollution rules. The action by the state Air Resources Board will give small fleets, lightly used trucks and those operating in rural areas more time to upgrade to newer, cleaner models or install filters to remove soot from their exhaust. Officials say the changes will slow pollution cuts for several years but still allow the state to reach its goal of cutting diesel emissions 85% by 2020.
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Eager to preserve the Internet's openness but not to be rebuked again by the courts, the Federal Communications Commission is crafting yet another set of "Net neutrality" rules to limit broadband providers' control over the data traveling through their networks. The tentative proposal unveiled Thursday seems more permissive than the rules a federal appeals panel rejected in January, prompting some critics to warn that Internet service providers will rush to create "toll lanes," giving preference to some content providers and moving their data faster to end-users.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Cheyenne overturned a Clinton-era ban on road construction in national forests. U.S. District Judge Clarence Brimmer's ruling is the latest turn in a legal battle over the rule that limited logging and other development in roadless areas, which constitute nearly a third of national forest land. Brimmer issued a permanent injunction against the so-called roadless rule, saying the ban violated the National Environmental Policy Act and the Wilderness Act. The ruling reflects a similar decision he issued in 2003.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1994
Upon reading the article "Irvine School Board Drops Controversial 'No-Fail' Rule" (Nov. 18), I was immediately interested. Being a student athlete myself, I know about the great strength, determination, and ability to deal with stress it takes to be active in high school sports and make the grades at the same time. It is a good thing that the "no-fail" rule has come to an end, because I know fellow student athletes who have "played the system" by taking easier classes just to stay eligible.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration's move to regulate e-cigarettes drew criticism Thursday from some public health advocates, who said the regulations do not go far enough to protect young consumers. The proposed rule would for the first time allow the government to limit the manufacture and sale of e-cigarettes, as well as cigars and pipe tobacco. Sales to minors would be banned and health warning labels required. But the new rules would not ban online sales or restrict youth-friendly flavors such as watermelon and peppermint.
OPINION
April 24, 2014 | By Francesca Dominici, Michael Greenstone and Cass R. Sunstein
Last week, a divided court of appeals upheld what may well be the most important environmental rule in the nation's history: the Environmental Protection Agency's mercury standards. The regulation is expected to prevent up to 11,000 premature deaths, 4,700 heart attacks and 130,000 asthma attacks a year. Critics of the mercury rule have focused on its expense. The EPA estimates it will cost $9.6 billion a year, with most of the burden falling on electric utilities. Indeed, the issue of cost is what split the court.
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