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NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court dealt a setback Monday to the popular redevelopment trend of transforming abandoned railroad lines into public bike paths, ruling that buyers of such lands are not required to continue granting a federal right of way. Legal experts said the decision would make it harder to build bike or hiking trails in areas of the West where railroads were often built on former federal land. In some instances, local governments may be forced to pay compensation to owners whose land is now crossed by bike paths or other government-built trails and parks.
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SPORTS
March 10, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 If there's one big lesson learned from last week's arbitration victory by four private schools over the CIF Southern Section, it's that the section will no longer decide to move private schools from their sports areas for competitive equity reasons. Twice the Southern Section has tried to move La Verne Damien and Glendora St. Lucy's, believing its bylaws provided authority to do so. Twice the schools have won legal decisions to stay put. "There's a message, and we have to accept that message," Southern Section Commissioner Rob Wigod said.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Ask a runner what sets the Boston Marathon apart, and he or she will tell you it's a people's race. You run with a herd through a series of towns around Boston and finish downtown to the cheers of a jubilant mob. But now, a year after two bombs killed three people and wounded scores more near the finish line on Boylston Street, one of the world's most famous marathons has become a 26.2-mile public-safety puzzle for officials hoping to prevent...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
More than 100 pot shops have shut down since Los Angeles started enforcing its new rules restricting medical marijuana dispensaries, City Atty. Mike Feuer announced Monday. Feuer said he was now stepping up that work, hiring two new attorneys who would exclusively tackle prosecutions under Proposition D, the measure passed by voters last spring. Staffers are also focusing more attention on real estate professionals and landlords renting space to marijuana dispensaries, providing them with a new brochure that warns of steep fines and jail time for breaking the rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Anxious about last summer's ruling on Proposition 8, sponsors of California ballot measures are going to considerable lengths to ensure they will be able to defend them if the state doesn't. Nearly 1 in 4 proposed initiatives include language intended to skirt the ruling and avoid having a measure overturned because of antipathy by state officials, a review of the measures showed. The proposal topics are as varied as public pensions and Internet privacy, each armed with clauses aimed at turning sponsors into semi-public officials able to defend the measures if the state refuses.
WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO - Egyptian authorities have enacted a new law that makes it impossible for results in the upcoming presidential election to be disputed in court, a presidential advisor said Saturday. The measure was approved by the country's interim President Adly Mansour as part of final preparations for a presidential vote this spring. The presumed front-runner, Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah Sisi, has yet to declare his candidacy. The vote was to have been held by mid-April, but the weeks-long delay in wroking out the election law makes that highly unlikely.
WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen and Richard A. Serrano
BEIJING - A massive search was underway Sunday for a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner, focusing on a spot off the southern coast of Vietnam where two large oil slicks were reported. But there were, so far, no clues to why the China-bound flight vanished without warning with 239 people on board. Malaysian officials investigating the disappearance said they were not ruling out terrorism - or any other causes - as reports emerged that two Europeans listed on the passenger manifest were not aboard and their passports had been lost or stolen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Susan King
Someone once told Kurt Russell that his acting career "looks like it was handled by a drunk driver. " And Russell's reply? "I said I can't deny that," he said, laughing. But the boyishly handsome 63-year-old Russell, whom most baby boomers first saw as Jungle Boy on a 1965 episode of "Gilligan's Island," may be selling himself a bit short. His choices might not fit the straight and narrow, but many of his parts over the years have been memorable. PHOTOS: Behind-the-scenes Classic Hollywood He was a heartthrob star at Disney more than 40 years ago in such films as 1969's "The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. -- A day later, Mike Trout was still confused about Thursday's play at the plate against the Dodgers, when baseball's new rules governing home-plate collisions and instant replay converged on the same play. Trout, trying for an inside-the-park home run, was called out on a head-first slide into the plate. Manager Mike Scioscia came out to argue not only the call but whether Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis was in violation of Rule 7.13, which prevents catchers from blocking the plate without the ball.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
California loves Tesla Motors. The Palo Alto electric car maker's Model S sedan is the state's new eco-luxury status symbol. Californians bought more than a third of Teslas sold globally last year. Residents of the state pack the order list for Tesla's next offering, a sport utility vehicle. California pollution-control policies enable Tesla to rake in tens of millions of dollars each year from selling environmental credits to other automakers - a key source of Tesla's revenue.
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