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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Pop held the top radio ratings spot as March brought little change from the previous month.  Clear Channel stations KIIS-FM (102.7), KOST-FM (103.5) and KBIG-FM (104.3) were again Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the Los Angeles market, according to numbers released this week by Nielsen Audio.   KIIS, known for pop hits from the likes of Lorde, John Legend and Pharrell Williams, accounted for 5.1% of radio listening in Los Angeles for the period that ended March 26. The channel drew 3.9 million listeners for at least five minutes each week.  Soft-rocker KOST was just barely behind, accounting for 5% of listening, while pop and rock destination KBIG landed 4.9%.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll In the critical morning drive time period -- weekdays, 6 to 10 a.m. -- CBS' alt-rock station KROQ continued to rule with its "Kevin & Bean" show.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials are revisiting the department's policy governing when and how deputies can use physical force, in light of a court ruling last year that officers can be held liable even for actions that led up to a shooting. The daughter of Shane Hayes, a mentally ill man who was shot and killed in his home by San Diego County sheriff's deputies after brandishing a knife, filed a wrongful death suit against the department. She argued that the deputies provoked the confrontation that led to the shooting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Air quality regulators, embarking on a bold new strategy to reduce smog in Southern California, want to hold the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach responsible for their pledges to cut pollution from thousands of trucks, ships and trains carrying goods to and from the nation's largest port complex. If a rule proposed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District is adopted, it could open the door to similar regulations on other facilities that are magnets for truck and rail traffic, such as warehouses, distribution centers and rail yards.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
SEATTLE -- Josh Hamilton injured his left thumb sliding head-first into first base Tuesday night, but that didn't prevent the Angels left fielder from giving Major League Baseball two thumbs down to an instant-replay ruling in the fifth inning of the Angels' 5-3 loss to the Seattle Mariners. With a runner on second and one out, Corey Hart lofted a fly ball to deep left that Hamilton appeared to catch above his head and pull toward his body, but the ball squirted out on the glove-to-hand transfer and fell to the ground.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Northwestern assailed the decision of a National Labor Relations Board regional director that the school's scholarship football players are employees and can unionize in an appeal filed Wednesday with the full board. "In this unprecedented decision, the regional director set out to alter the underlying premise upon which college varsity sports is based," Northwestern lawyers wrote. The 50-page request for review repeatedly jabbed Peter Sung Ohr, the NLRB's regional director in Chicago who ruled in favor of former Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter and the College Athletes Players Assn.
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | By Marcia Fritz
When it comes to meeting California's state pension obligations, everyone agrees that paying the bills is a challenge. But exactly how big is the "unfunded liability"? Pessimists and optimists throw out wildly different totals for the state's 80 retirement systems, making for confusion at best and stalemate at worst when it comes to honest policymaking. The truth is, pension systems have to involve assumptions. Workers and employers pay in at a certain rate, the money is invested, and if it all goes according to plan, there is enough to cover the promises made to the workers when they retire.
SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By Chris Foster
Larry Scott may be the Pac-12 commissioner, but he is concerned about what's going on in the Big 10. Scott weighed in on the Northwestern situation this week with an opinion piece in USA Today. The Northwestern players are attempting to unionize, an effort that gained traction when the National Labor Relations Board in Chicago defined them as “employees.” The ruling affects football players only at a private university. The Wildcats players will vote whether to unionize on April 25 th . Scott said that the NLRB ruling was a “terrible idea” and that it would “destroy” college sports.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
No one should have expected that putting more vegetables in front of elementary school students would instantly turn them into an army of broccoli fans. Plenty of food has been thrown out since new federal rules took effect in 2011 requiring students in the subsidized school lunch program to choose a fruit or vegetable each day. Nevertheless, studies find that continued exposure to produce is resulting in more children eating at least some of it. That's worth a certain amount of wasted food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler may not resume lead smelting until its furnaces can operate in compliance with tough new air district rules on arsenic emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board ruled Tuesday that Exide Technologies, which is accused of endangering the health of more than 100,000 people across southeast Los Angeles County, must maintain "negative pressure" in its furnaces. That means particles from the smelting process must be sucked into air pollution control devices that can keep toxic compounds from wafting over neighborhoods.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- New draft rules limiting greenhouse gases from existing power plants will give states the tools to curtail emissions that drive climate change without shuttering lots of facilities and threatening electric reliability, said Gina McCarthy, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, at a panel discussion in Washington on Monday. “Nothing we do can threaten reliability,” McCarthy said at a conference hosted by the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington think tank, especially because “in a changing climate, it will be increasingly challenging to maintain a reliable energy supply.” In a sweeping speech on climate change in June, President Obama directedthe EPA to develop rules to cut greenhouse gases from power plants, the single largest domestic source of heat-trapping emissions.
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