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OPINION
December 20, 2013
Re “One tiny step for budget reform,” Opinion, Dec. 17 Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson represent today's bipartisanship. They represent the political donor class, the only constituency that both parties rush to serve. Sure, they may talk about closing tax loopholes for the wealthy in the abstract, but they speak in specifics when it comes to cutting benefits for you and me. The top marginal tax rates were more than 50% when we did not have huge deficits. They were cut to the mid-30% in the 1980s, when the deficits ballooned.
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OPINION
December 20, 2013
Re “One tiny step for budget reform,” Opinion, Dec. 17 Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson represent today's bipartisanship. They represent the political donor class, the only constituency that both parties rush to serve. Sure, they may talk about closing tax loopholes for the wealthy in the abstract, but they speak in specifics when it comes to cutting benefits for you and me. The top marginal tax rates were more than 50% when we did not have huge deficits. They were cut to the mid-30% in the 1980s, when the deficits ballooned.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Peter Barnes, the British playwright, screenwriter and director best known for his 1968 play "The Ruling Class," a satirical attack on the church and British aristocracy that he later adapted for the screen, died Thursday in a London hospital. He was 73. Barnes, who delivered two screenplays this week, was hospitalized two days ago after a heart attack, said his friend, writer-producer Judd Bernard. A late-in-life father, Barnes leaves behind 19-month-old triplets and a 4-year-old daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
  When, during his recent State of the Union address, President Obama spoke of "an economy where everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules," I wasn't worried about the GOP response or changes to our tax codes. I was worried about Downton. Everyone loves "Downton Abbey. "PBS' biggest hit in years, it's won Emmys, a Golden Globe and the critics' hearts. We are all smitten with the elegant writing, the fabulous cast (Maggie Smith!
REAL ESTATE
August 14, 2005 | Stephen Glassman and Donie Vanitzian, Special to The Times
Question: In my association, we have three classes of homeowners: board members, their friends and then the rest of the homeowners. A "friend of the board" has the association-paid gardener work in his private patio while the gardener is on the clock. The gardener is paid in cash and tipped heavily. Another friend of the board has total access to the management company, yet other homeowners don't get calls returned.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | RUTHANNE SALIDO
The wealthy and distinguished 13th Earl of Gurney, who gets his jollies by hanging from a noose in his bedroom, goes a little too far one day and--blast it all--dies. Oops. Phone the heir. This is about as sane as things get in "The Ruling Class," which follows the new earl's "road to sanity."
OPINION
June 17, 2003 | Paul E. Dinter, Paul E. Dinter, author of "The Other Side of the Altar" (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, 2003), was Catholic chaplain at Columbia University for 15 years. He is now married and works with Care for the Homeless in New York City.
Just before the United States Catholic bishops' meeting 20 years ago, I was part of a dinner with then-Bishop Roger Mahony of Stockton, Calif. In those days, he stood out as one of a new breed of bishops. Achieving stature for his support for Cesar Chavez's farm workers, he had also become a supporter of the nuclear freeze, a movement that was rattling both the Reagan administration and Cold War Democrats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1995 | ASTRID S. TUMINEZ, Astrid S. Tuminez is a program officer at Carnegie Corporation of New York. She lived in Moscow for 18 months in 1990-92 as director of the Harvard Project on Strengthening Democratic Institutions
The U.S. media have delivered bad news about Russia for years.
WORLD
May 18, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The bloodied SUV was discovered, abandoned in the middle of the night and doors askew, at the gates of his sprawling ranch. Diego Fernandez de Cevallos, Mexico's brash-mouthed, cigar-chomping political powerbroker, had vanished. In a country inured to killings and kidnappings, the mysterious disappearance of Fernandez de Cevallos in Saturday's wee hours has riveted and horrified Mexicans — especially the ruling class. It has dominated headlines, talk shows, conversation on buses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1996
Re "Youth, Crime and Public Money," editorial, June 25: While prevention of crime is monetarily cheaper compared to prisons, there is a detrimental social effect which outweighs the monetary cost. These (mostly minority) persons saved from a life of crime then will be in competition for jobs with the sons and daughters of the ruling class. Putting people in prison is simply a jobs-protection program. Case in point: the severe difference in penalties for possession of rock cocaine (mostly black users)
BUSINESS
April 15, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Accounting firm Ernst & Young must face a class action suit over option backdating at Broadcom Corp., a federal appeals court has ruled, saying the auditors knew or should have known about the resulting misrepresentations in the Irvine tech company's financial statements. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco reinstated Ernst & Young as a defendant in the investor lawsuit, overturning a 2009 decision by U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real.
WORLD
May 18, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The bloodied SUV was discovered, abandoned in the middle of the night and doors askew, at the gates of his sprawling ranch. Diego Fernandez de Cevallos, Mexico's brash-mouthed, cigar-chomping political powerbroker, had vanished. In a country inured to killings and kidnappings, the mysterious disappearance of Fernandez de Cevallos in Saturday's wee hours has riveted and horrified Mexicans — especially the ruling class. It has dominated headlines, talk shows, conversation on buses.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2009
Stage set for Acropolis fix Greek authorities say they will partially restore the ruined marble theater under the Acropolis, where the works of Euripides and other classical playwrights were first performed about 2,500 years ago. The Culture Ministry said Wednesday that the $9-million program was set for completion by 2015 and would include extensive modern additions to the surviving marble seats of the Theater of Dionysos. Built on the southern slopes of the Acropolis Hill, the theater was first used in the late 6th century BC. It hosted the opening performances of tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, as well as Aristophanes' comedies.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
A judge has certified a lawsuit seeking unpaid wages and overtime for field technicians at cable company Charter Communications Inc. as a class-action lawsuit. St. Louis-based Charter didn't pay field technicians for all the time they worked, two law firms said. The firms are seeking unpaid wages and overtime compensation for about 8,000 current and former employees of Charter.
WORLD
December 27, 2007 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
An uneasy calm returned to the oil-rich Persian Gulf island nation of Bahrain on Wednesday after a week of clashes between Shiite Muslim opposition groups and forces of the Sunni-dominated government. The street fighting, sparked by the death of an activist, was some of the worst since a 1990s Shiite uprising and led to an undetermined number of injured and the arrest of dozens.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
In a major legal victory for Merck & Co. in its massive Vioxx litigation, New Jersey's Supreme Court on Thursday rejected a potential class-action lawsuit that could have cost the drug maker as much as $18 billion. New Jersey's highest court, reversing two lower-court decisions, ruled that a nationwide class-action suit was not appropriate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1988
In his commentary George F. Will decries what he sees as merely an "intramural rough-housing in the ruling class, a battle between two briefcase brigades." Will asserts that the civil-rights laws are being exploited by the New York City Council's anti-discrimination ruling in favor of women Will considers already "rich," and whose desire for greater economic power Will deems worthy only of "guffaws." Although Will's arguments make sense superficially, on a deeper level they represent tactics often employed by "ruling class" members in order to divide women among themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990
German voters went to the polls on Dec. 2 and 78% of 59.9 million eligible voters (reportedly the lowest turnout since 1949) cast their ballots. Isn't it about time that we Americans are allowed to vote on a Saturday or Sunday also? Our low voter turnout is a national disgrace and embarrassment. And while we are in the mood for a change, let's also have door-to-door voter registration like they do in Canada. People who are registered are much more likely to vote. Expect much opposition and howls of rage from our current power structure, however, if ordinary Americans try to change the current comfy vote-on-a-weekday arrangement, which makes it very difficult for long-distance commuters and working couples to get to the polls.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
In a blow to the tobacco industry, a federal judge ruled Monday that a jury should decide whether tobacco companies must pay tens of millions of smokers as much as $200 billion for allegedly duping them into buying "light" cigarettes over the last three decades. The cigarette makers said they would appeal but their shares sank on Wall Street as the ruling granting class-action status to the case clouded what had appeared to be an improving legal environment for the industry. Altria Group Inc.
REAL ESTATE
August 14, 2005 | Stephen Glassman and Donie Vanitzian, Special to The Times
Question: In my association, we have three classes of homeowners: board members, their friends and then the rest of the homeowners. A "friend of the board" has the association-paid gardener work in his private patio while the gardener is on the clock. The gardener is paid in cash and tipped heavily. Another friend of the board has total access to the management company, yet other homeowners don't get calls returned.
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