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Rulon Gardner

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011 | Rene Lynch
For much of his storied sports career, two-time Olympic medalist Rulon Gardner was a slave to the scale. He used rigorous, hours-long workouts to keep his weight in check and relied upon old-school wrestling tricks -- like exercising in a sauna -- to drop unwanted pounds before a competition. And when he retired from Greco-Roman wrestling -- and keeping his weight at roughly 270 pounds -- Gardner recalls thinking "I'll never have to look at a scale again. " Wrong. The 6-foot, 1-inch wrestling legend is back on the scale each week, only now he's doing it in front of millions of viewers as part of the cast of NBC's reality weight-loss show, "The Biggest Loser.
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SPORTS
April 19, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
Wrestler Rulon Gardner is in the familiar position of facing impossible odds. No one believed the Wyoming farm boy could beat legendary Greco-Roman wrestler Russian Alexander Karelin at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, yet Gardner won the gold medal in the heavyweight class. Few believed he could come back after a snowmobile accident to compete on the Olympic stage again, yet he returned to win a bronze medal in Athens. After experiencing a huge weight gain that he couldn't tackle until he appeared on TV's “The Biggest Loser,” Gardner is trying for another Olympic comeback at age 40. But his age wasn't his only obstacle as he prepared for the U.S. Olympic wrestling trials this weekend in Iowa City, Iowa.
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SPORTS
October 25, 2002 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Sometime during the cold, snowy night between Feb. 14 and 15, Rulon Gardner had a vision. He and two friends, Trent Simkins and Danny Schwab, had gone snowmobiling in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, near their home in Afton, Wyo. Schwab turned back about 3:30 p.m. to attend his daughter's basketball game, and he and Gardner got separated. Schwab found his way home but Gardner, unfamiliar with the terrain, drove his snowmobile into a gully and couldn't escape.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011 | Rene Lynch
For much of his storied sports career, two-time Olympic medalist Rulon Gardner was a slave to the scale. He used rigorous, hours-long workouts to keep his weight in check and relied upon old-school wrestling tricks -- like exercising in a sauna -- to drop unwanted pounds before a competition. And when he retired from Greco-Roman wrestling -- and keeping his weight at roughly 270 pounds -- Gardner recalls thinking "I'll never have to look at a scale again. " Wrong. The 6-foot, 1-inch wrestling legend is back on the scale each week, only now he's doing it in front of millions of viewers as part of the cast of NBC's reality weight-loss show, "The Biggest Loser.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | Bill Dwyre, Times Staff Writer
The shadow of Alexander Karelin remains with Rulon Gardner, even though the historic moment that will bind them forever occurred four years ago. Tuesday night, in a wrestling hall in suburban Athens, American Greco-Roman star Gardner won his way into Wednesday's semifinals. He is the star now. It was his night, just as today is likely to be his time to win a second consecutive gold medal, which would be a first for the United States in Greco-Roman wrestling.
SPORTS
April 10, 2004
Olympic "hero" or what, Rulon Gardner is a bona fide moron. Give him enough rope and he'll hang himself. Give him enough time and he'll eventually hang someone with him. Ron Romanosky Tustin
SPORTS
April 17, 2001 | Associated Press
Rulon Gardner, whose dramatic victory in Greco-Roman wrestling was a highlight of the Sydney Olympics, won the James E. Sullivan Award on Monday. The award is presented by the Amateur Athletic Union to the nation's outstanding amateur athlete. Gardner won the Olympic gold medal by defeating Aleksandr Karelin in the final, the Russian's first loss in 13 years. The wrestler from Afton, Wyo., was chosen by the U.S. team to carry the American flag at the closing ceremonies in Sydney.
SPORTS
February 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Olympic gold medal wrestler Rulon Gardner easily won Saturday as he returned for his first full tournament since losing a toe in a snowmobiling mishap nearly a year ago. The 267-pound Gardner was in championship form, taking only 1 minute 35 seconds to gain an 11-0 decision over Colombia's Danis Renteria in a preliminary match. The Dave Schultz Memorial International Tournament at the Olympic Training Center was to continue today.
SPORTS
August 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Cuba tuned up for the Greco-Roman wrestling world championships in style by winning all seven gold medals at the Pan American Games on Sunday in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Not even Sydney Olympic gold medalist Rulon Gardner could stand in their way. Gardner lost, 5-0, to Mijian Lopez in the heavyweight class, earning instead one of America's four silver medals. The 6-foot-3, 277-pound Lopez was simply more athletic and quick on his feet than the 6-1, 275-pound Gardner.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | RANDY HARVEY
How did Rulon Gardner, a farm boy from Afton, Wyo., end the 13-year winning streak of Russia's Alexander "The Great" Karelin, a Greco-Roman wrestling legend, and get to the top of the medals stand at the Summer Olympics? It's an American story, not a typical one, but still an American story. It begins in 1885, when Rulon's great-great-grandfather, Archibald Gardner, sent the youngest of his 11 wives from Utah to Wyoming. Archibald had immigrated from Scotland to Canada, where he became a Mormon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2011 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
Bob Harper isn't going anywhere. Season 11 of "The Biggest Loser" starts Tuesday on NBC with the biggest twist the weight-loss show has ever seen: Contestants must choose between working out with Harper and Jillian Michaels or with two unknown trainers. Why would anyone choose the latter? Because it comes with four weeks immunity from elimination ? the most valuable prize the show has to offer short of the $250,000 payday awaiting the contestant who loses the largest percentage of his or her body weight.
SPORTS
August 26, 2004 | Marlen Garcia, Chicago Tribune
Rulon Gardner hastily untied his shoes, his eyes stinging with sweat and tears. After the referee declared him a 3-0, bronze-medal winner over Iran's Sajad Barzi, Gardner sat down on the center of the mat and took off his size-13 wrestling shoes. He did it just as he did when he was kid, he said later. Only Wednesday, at 33, he did it for the last time.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | Bill Dwyre, Times Staff Writer
The shadow of Alexander Karelin remains with Rulon Gardner, even though the historic moment that will bind them forever occurred four years ago. Tuesday night, in a wrestling hall in suburban Athens, American Greco-Roman star Gardner won his way into Wednesday's semifinals. He is the star now. It was his night, just as today is likely to be his time to win a second consecutive gold medal, which would be a first for the United States in Greco-Roman wrestling.
SPORTS
May 23, 2004 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Nothing Rulon Gardner does will surpass his stunning upset of Greco-Roman wrestling legend Alexander Karelin at the Sydney Olympics. And he's smart enough not to waste the rest of his life trying to re-create that singular moment. Instead, the Wyoming native has set his sights on the present and on overcoming the obstacles placed in his path by misfortune and his own missteps. Gardner won the Olympic trials challenge tournament Saturday in the 264.
SPORTS
April 10, 2004
Olympic "hero" or what, Rulon Gardner is a bona fide moron. Give him enough rope and he'll hang himself. Give him enough time and he'll eventually hang someone with him. Ron Romanosky Tustin
SPORTS
April 8, 2004 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
He remembers a car suddenly pulling out in front of his motorcycle to make a left turn, and immediately realizing he was boxed in on the right by cars jutting into the narrow street near the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. Rulon Gardner knew he was about to hit the Mazda that had come out of nowhere. The only question was how bad the collision would be. "I was thinking, 'Should I jump or take the hit?' " he said.
SPORTS
February 16, 2002 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rulon Gardner, whose "Miracle on the Mat" victory in Greco-Roman wrestling made him the American darling of the 2000 Summer Olympics, was hospitalized early Friday morning for hypothermia and possible frostbite after spending the night outside when he became stranded while snowmobiling near his hometown of Afton, Wyo. Gardner spent the night in temperatures near 20 degrees below zero after getting stuck in deep snow in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Lt.
SPORTS
October 13, 2000 | HELENE ELLIOTT and HOUSTON MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
His story was the stuff Olympic dreams once were made of. Small-town boy Rulon Gardner, called "Fatso" by childhood schoolmates, grows up to be a world-class competitor in the obscure sport of Greco-Roman wrestling. He qualifies for the Olympics in Sydney, Australia, where he is matched against the master of the sport, Alexander Karelin of Russia, in the gold-medal heavyweight match. Against all odds, Gardner defeats Karelin, one of the greatest upsets in Olympic history. All of Afton, Wyo.
SPORTS
August 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
Cuba tuned up for the Greco-Roman wrestling world championships in style by winning all seven gold medals at the Pan American Games on Sunday in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Not even Sydney Olympic gold medalist Rulon Gardner could stand in their way. Gardner lost, 5-0, to Mijian Lopez in the heavyweight class, earning instead one of America's four silver medals. The 6-foot-3, 277-pound Lopez was simply more athletic and quick on his feet than the 6-1, 275-pound Gardner.
SPORTS
August 3, 2003 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
With no air conditioning available, the heat and humidity inside the Combat Pavilion at Olympic Park was stifling Saturday, sending streams of sweat down the chest and arms of wrestler Rulon Gardner. And he loved every drop of it. For one thing, his first day of competition at the XIV Pan American Games was 125 degrees warmer than that disastrous night in Wyoming nearly 18 months ago when he almost lost his life on a snowmobile outing gone wrong.
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