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Runaway Production

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By David Horsey
How much longer can Hollywood claim to be the movie capital of the world? Can the California Legislature reverse the slide of film production away from Los Angeles simply by enhancing tax credits for the movie and television industry or, one day, will the Oscars be presented in Atlanta or Toronto or New Orleans? Such questions grow more pertinent year by year. Lawmakers in Sacramento are now mulling over a plan that would extend the current $100-million movie industry tax credit program that is set to expire on July 1, 2017.
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NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Whether Mayor Eric Garcetti's open letter urging CBS to move “The Late Show” to Los Angeles was a political stunt or a savvy business move - or both  - he's clearly making runaway production a key issue, even if he can't stop it himself. Just hours after longtime “Late Show” host David Letterman announced plans to retire in 2015, Garcetti released a note he sent to CBS chief Les Moonves encouraging him to move the next version of the show to Los Angeles. He wrote: “I have made the entertainment industry a key priority for my administration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1989
I never cease to be astonished by the cavalier and indifferent attitude that Hollywood and Los Angeles project toward the movie industry. Amid all the publicity and self-congratulatory hoopla over Disney's new theme park and production facility in Orlando, Fla., did no one realize that what we have here is the most aggressive display of runaway production yet? Of course, Hollywood studios have always been notorious for their lack of community involvement, but to see the unions, craft people and guilds yawn blithely while the industry drifts out of the city and the state is shocking.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Jon Healey
FilmL.A. produced another one of its gloomy reports on runaway production Thursday, this time looking at the 108 films released last year by the 11 leading studios. One of the most galling findings : More of those films had been shot in Louisiana than in the state that's home to 10 of those studios (that would be California, in case you've forgotten). Louisiana, really? That's almost as bad as the Lakers getting stomped by the Pelicans. What's worse, as my colleague Richard Verrier reports , California's share of big-budget films has shrunk dramatically.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Jon Healey
FilmL.A. produced another one of its gloomy reports on runaway production Thursday, this time looking at the 108 films released last year by the 11 leading studios. One of the most galling findings : More of those films had been shot in Louisiana than in the state that's home to 10 of those studios (that would be California, in case you've forgotten). Louisiana, really? That's almost as bad as the Lakers getting stomped by the Pelicans. What's worse, as my colleague Richard Verrier reports , California's share of big-budget films has shrunk dramatically.
OPINION
April 25, 1999 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Pepperdine Institute of Public Policy and a fellow at the Reason Foundation
After a decade of rapid expansion, the Southland's globally dominant cultural-industrial complex appears to be retrenching. Propelled in part by a glut in feature films and a decline in network ratings, film and television production, up nearly 80% since 1993, appears to have reached a plateau. Job growth, which had been averaging more than 10,000 annually, has stopped and even begun to contract.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
California's film and television economy faces a potential Hollywood-style cliffhanger from such myriad problems as runaway production, slackening growth in DVD sales and union restlessness, according to an industry report to be released today. The survey by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. depicts an industry under siege and whose outlook is murky. The entertainment industry employs nearly 250,000 people in the county, according to the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1999 | SHEILA JAMES KUEHL
Mention "Southern California" and "industry" in the same sentence and any listener will supply the third part: "Hollywood." For most of this century, film and television production have been a staple of our area's economy and cultural life--and one could say our identity.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asserting that runaway production is not just a Hollywood problem but a national one, six congressmen vowed Wednesday to support legislation to encourage filmmakers to stay in the United States instead of leaving for cheaper locales such as Canada and Mexico. Representatives, led by Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.), chairman of the Republican Caucus' Entertainment Industry Task Force, held a forum at a Burbank hotel to discuss potential measures ranging from tax incentives to trade tariffs.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In a closed-door meeting on the Sony Pictures Entertainment lot, a few dozen location scouts, agents, producers and studio executives gathered to discuss the state of L.A.'s hometown industry. Taking center stage: Los Angeles Mayor-elect Eric Garcetti. Garcetti held the meeting recently to solicit ideas on how he can help stem the exodus of film and TV production from Southern California. He pledged to fight runaway production and to name a film czar to serve as an industry advocate in City Hall.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Tom Capizzi is going to Hollywood Sunday night for the 86th Academy Awards, but not in a limo or a tux. Instead, he will be protesting near the Dolby Theatre, hoisting a green sign saying "Chase Talent Not Subsidies. " Capizzi will be among hundreds of visual effects workers staging a pre-Oscar rally, hoping to bring attention to the plight of rank-and-file entertainment industry workers who have been hard hit by the flight of film and TV jobs to other states and countries offering rich incentives.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
After the death Tuesday of L.A. film czar Tom Sherak, his deputy, Rajiv Dalal, the last executive to work with him, shared his thoughts on his passing: We grew very close in his waning months, and I feel that there is one story still to be told -- how Tom dedicated the last three months of his life to help the people of Los Angeles. When first we met, Tom was in the early stages of recuperating from what was hoped to be his last chemotherapy treatment.  And while he likely needed more time for recovery, Tom recognized the urgency of being the mayor's newly appointed film czar and charged forth to begin stemming runaway production.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By David Horsey
How much longer can Hollywood claim to be the movie capital of the world? Can the California Legislature reverse the slide of film production away from Los Angeles simply by enhancing tax credits for the movie and television industry or, one day, will the Oscars be presented in Atlanta or Toronto or New Orleans? Such questions grow more pertinent year by year. Lawmakers in Sacramento are now mulling over a plan that would extend the current $100-million movie industry tax credit program that is set to expire on July 1, 2017.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Even before he took office, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti vowed to name a film czar to serve as an industry advocate in City Hall and to help stop runaway production. But nearly three months later, Garcetti is still searching for someone to fill the position, underscoring the challenges of finding the right person for what some might consider the impossible job of persuading Sacramento to do more to help Hollywood. "It's been a struggle for everyone who wants this to happen and wants this to move forward, but it doesn't surprise me," said Ed Duffy, business agent and vice president for Teamsters Local 399, which represents location managers, casting directors and studio drivers.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In a closed-door meeting on the Sony Pictures Entertainment lot, a few dozen location scouts, agents, producers and studio executives gathered to discuss the state of L.A.'s hometown industry. Taking center stage: Los Angeles Mayor-elect Eric Garcetti. Garcetti held the meeting recently to solicit ideas on how he can help stem the exodus of film and TV production from Southern California. He pledged to fight runaway production and to name a film czar to serve as an industry advocate in City Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
This should be a golden age for visual effects in movies. Thanks to the box office success of movies such as "The Avengers" and "Life of Pi," demand for visual effects has never been greater. Studios are spending $100 million or more to put ever more stunning digital images on the big screen. But the companies that create the computer-generated imagery for those blockbusters are struggling as a rising tide of globalization and runaway production takes a toll on an industry that California pioneered.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
It may have been a blockbuster year at the box office, but 2009 was a dud for local film and TV production. On-location filming in Los Angeles sank 19% last year compared with 2008, the steepest year-over-year decline since tracking began in 1993, according to FilmL.A. Inc., the nonprofit group that handles film permits for the city and parts of the county. The production sector -- a major employer and key component of L.A.'s local economy -- was buffeted on several fronts. These included the recession, which led to a decline in film, TV and commercial shoots; the ongoing exodus of production from the region; and the long-term effects of a contract dispute with actors, which caused financing for independent features to dwindle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
California lost $3 billion in wages from 2004 to 2011 because of film and TV production flocking to other states and countries, a new study concludes. Burbank-based Entertainment Partners, the industry's largest payroll service company, which specializes in advising companies on how they can take advantage of film tax credits around the world, says its own research has found that California lost 90,000 jobs and saw its share of overall production wages in the U.S. decline 10% during the period as film producers took their business elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
A state bill aimed at curbing runaway production has moved closer to becoming law. The Assembly Appropriations Committee unanimously supported a bill that would extend funding for California's film and television tax credit program. Funding for the program is due to expire next year. California sets aside $100 million annually for dozens of projects applying for credits between 20% and 25% of qualified production expenses for movies and TV shows. The bill, however, was amended to provide for an extension of two years instead of five years.
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