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Runoff Vote

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WORLD
November 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's Rafael Correa, a leftist vowing to rein in political elites, won Sunday's presidential runoff with 57% of the votes after most ballot boxes were tallied, a top election official said. Opponent Alvaro Noboa has refused to accept defeat and says he might challenge the election with a review of the ballots.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 21, 2012
Re "Debating the top-two system," Column, June 18 George Skelton says it's "screwy" to redo an election in November if one candidate receives more than 50% of the vote in the primary. But low turnout raises problems with skipping the runoff. Instead, eliminate the primary, not the November election. Allow all candidates to run in November, with voters marking their first, second, third and fourth choices. Count everyone's first choice, eliminate the candidate with the fewest votes and apply those voters' second choice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Long Beach City Council candidate who lost a runoff election by a razor-thin margin filed suit Monday to overturn the results, alleging that eight people voted twice and dozens of others mistakenly cast their ballots in the wrong council race. Dee Andrews, a candidate in the 6th District, filed the lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court against Laura Richardson-Batts, who won the June 6 special election by six votes after a recount.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As the battle rages between the Republican establishment and the tea party, two Texas GOP candidates for the Senate are headed toward a costly runoff as their party works to take majority control of the chamber this fall. Ted Cruz, an underdog backed by the tea party and Sarah Palin, forced Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst into the July 31 runoff when neither emerged with 50% of the vote in this week's election. Because the Lone Star State remains reliably Republican, the winner of the showdown is likely to take the general election and become the state's next senator.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | Times Wire Services
President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi are expected to meet Monday to try to resolve the political crisis that has threatened to revive Angola's civil war. The outlook is for a runoff election. The crisis arose when Savimbi challenged the tentative results of the Sept. 29-30 election, which showed Dos Santos getting more than half the vote.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | Reuters
The National Election Board on Thursday rejected a request by Peruvian opposition candidate Alejandro Toledo to postpone a May 28 runoff against President Alberto Fujimori, throwing the election into doubt. Toledo had refused a few hours earlier to participate in the runoff if it is held as scheduled, saying there was not enough time to resolve fears of fraud and unfair voting conditions. "A delay in the date of the second election has been rejected," a statement from the election panel said.
WORLD
September 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
An election official warned that Afghanistan had a two-week window in October to hold any presidential runoff before winter snows arrived -- a somber reminder of how minor delays could leave a power vacuum well into next year. Preliminary results from Afghanistan's Aug. 20 vote show President Hamid Karzai winning outright with 54.6%. But if enough votes are found to be fraudulent from an election mired in allegations of ballot stuffing and voter coercion, Karzai could dip below the 50% threshold needed to avoid a runoff with challenger Abdullah Abdullah.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel leader Jonas Savimbi said he would take part in a runoff election against President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who he said failed to win the needed 50% of the votes in the Sept. 29-30 election. Under pressure from Savimbi, officials have not released final results; partial returns showed Dos Santos with about 50%. Savimbi has charged vote fraud and hinted that his rebel group would renew the long civil war.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Arizona Legislature voted in Phoenix to conduct the state's first runoff gubernatorial election Feb. 26, despite complaints by Indian lawmakers that voters could be trapped at home by snow on reservation roads. The bill on the runoff between Fife Symington and Terry Goddard was signed by Gov. Rose Mofford. Symington, a Republican, edged Democrat Goddard 49.7% to 49.2% in the Nov. 6 election. State law requires that a governor be elected by a majority of the votes cast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | MARC LACEY, Times Staff Writer
Voters in Inglewood Tuesday elected newcomer Jose Fernandez the first Latino on the City Council and, spurning the endorsement of Mayor Edward Vincent, sent two-term incumbent Daniel K. Tabor back for another four years in a narrow runoff victory. Political observers said the election results, coupled with Thomasina Reed's strong showing in the school board race and Councilman Ervin (Tony) Thomas' court-mandated runoff with Garland Hardeman in the fall, suggest more independence in Inglewood politics and a decline in Vincent's citywide political reach.
WORLD
October 18, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
They make an odd team: the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and the former warlord who once sipped a beer while watching his men cut the ears off a president and then kill him. But politics makes strange partners — especially in Liberia, where many public figures have a history. Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, who won the peace prize this month, is pragmatic about her bid for a second six-year term. She told the BBC she was willing to work with "all Liberians" (after it became obvious she had failed to win a majority in the first round of the presidential election last week, forcing her into a runoff)
WORLD
August 29, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
In a now familiar political ritual, Japan's ruling party on Monday picked a new prime minister -- the sixth in five years -- to lead the nation past a host of domestic ills, including a stagnant economy and a lingering nuclear crisis. In a tense runoff vote, Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda, known as a tight-fisted fiscal hawk, defeated his closest rival, Trade Minister Banri Kaieda, even though Kaieda's had the backing of a powerful but publicly disgraced party boss. The 54-year-old Noda replaces outgoing Prime Minister Naoto Kan, who resigned Friday after just 15 months in office, carrying through on a promise to step down amid criticism that he had mishandled the nation's response to the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.
WORLD
April 6, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel, Los Angeles Times
Michel Martelly, the popular singer turned improbable candidate, was all but assured of becoming Haiti's next president Tuesday after his opponent's camp appeared to rule out challenging vote tallies issued a day earlier. Martelly, who ran as an outsider trumpeting change, sounded triumphant in his first public comments since preliminary results showed him easily defeating Mirlande Manigat, a university executive and former first lady. "You have chosen to break with our old quarrels, our artificial divisions, the prevailing negativity," Martelly told Haitians from the stage at a restaurant in Petionville, a wealthy suburb in the hills above the capital, Port-au-Prince.
OPINION
January 16, 2011 | By Amy Wilentz
Here's what's wrong with Haiti right now: A year after an earthquake ripped through the capital and nearby towns like an atomic bomb, killing an estimated 300,000 people, the Haitian government is wasting its limited energies politicking rather than working on a serious recovery plan. Pushed by an international community that wants to know what government it will be dealing with as promised foreign recovery monies come into the country, Haitian officials have fallen into a vortex of farcical horse-trading to determine who will next take hold of this bucking and plunging country and try to ride it into the future.
WORLD
December 24, 2010 | Times Wire Services
Ivory Coast state television disappeared from the airwaves outside the nation's largest city on Thursday, a blow to the incumbent president's attempts to cling to power in the bloody aftermath of an election most of the world says he lost. Also Thursday, the United Nations recognized incumbent Laurent Gbagbo's challenger, Alassane Ouattara, as the winner of the Nov. 28 runoff vote. The 192-nation U.N. General Assembly rescinded the credentials of Ivory Coast's ambassador, Ilahiri Djedje, a Gbagbo supporter, and accepted those of Ouattara's choice, veteran diplomat Youssouf Bamba.
WORLD
December 3, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Faced with disputed presidential election results, Ivory Coast on Thursday looked set for a power struggle that could plunge the troubled West African country back into civil war. After delays in announcing the results of Sunday's presidential runoff vote, the electoral commission late Thursday declared former Prime Minister Alassane Ouattara the victor over President Laurent Gbagbo, who had been in power for a decade. According to the commission, Ouattara won 54% of the vote and Gbagbo 46%. Shortly after the announcement, the military sealed off air, land and sea borders without giving any reason, Reuters news agency reported.
NEWS
March 18, 1995 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Carlos Menem has a long lead in the race to win the May 14 elections, but a new dark-horse candidate is coming up from the rear. Sen. Jose Octavio Bordon, a defector from Menem's Peronist Party, has emerged almost overnight as the opposition's best hope for forcing a runoff vote. Noticias magazine recently put Bordon on its cover, calling him "The Peronist Who Could Beat Menem." It is still hard to see how Menem could lose, but Bordon is just getting started.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
Iran's reformers won 52 of the 66 seats contested in runoff legislative elections, the nation's largest pro-democracy party said Saturday. The reformers' victory was seen as yet another setback for Islamic hard-liners fighting change. The runoff was held three months after allies of Iran's reformist president won nearly 75% of the seats decided in the first round of voting for parliament, or Majlis.
WORLD
October 19, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Electoral officials sifting through thousands of complaints of vote fraud in last month's parliamentary elections said Monday that ballots from about one-tenth of Afghanistan's voting centers had been tossed out, with more disqualifications likely. The release of preliminary results, now due Wednesday, has been delayed twice as authorities scrutinize a welter of allegations including ballot box stuffing and vote buying, as well as armed intimidation of voters. It is not yet clear whether the scale of fraud in September's parliamentary vote will be found to be as serious as that in last year's presidential election, when about one-third of the ballots cast for President Hamid Karzai were thrown out. Karzai ultimately prevailed after his main rival dropped out of a runoff vote, but the tainted election set the tone for a tempestuous second term, marked by widening public discontent with his administration and quarrels with his Western backers.
OPINION
November 1, 2009 | Peter W. Galbraith, Peter W. Galbraith is the former deputy special representative of the secretary-general of the United Nations in Afghanistan.
Massive fraud in the first round of Afghanistan's presidential elections, held Aug. 20, plunged the country into a seven-week political crisis that gave the Taliban its greatest strategic gains in eight years of war. As things now stand, the second round, scheduled for Saturday, will be even worse. The runoff election faces profound challenges. Afghanistan's fraudulent first round undermined President Hamid Karzai's credibility both at home and in key countries contributing troops to the region.
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