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Runyon Canyon Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
A hiker died at Runyon Canyon Park on Sunday after falling ill, the Los Angeles Fire Department said. A fire helicopter joined ground crews in responding to reports of a male adult hiker who had collapsed and stopped breathing just before 2:30 p.m., authorities said. Less than an hour later, the LAFD tweeted that the man had died on the trail at the popular hiking destination. “He was just walking and then he just tumbled and lost consciousness,” John Zahedi, who witnessed the hiker's collapse, told KTLA-TV . Jenny Gittler, a nurse who was on the trail at the time, administered CPR to the man for seven minutes before the EMTs arrived by helicopter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times staff
A hiker died at Runyon Canyon Park on Sunday after falling ill, the Los Angeles Fire Department said. A fire helicopter joined ground crews in responding to reports of a male adult hiker who had collapsed and stopped breathing just before 2:30 p.m., authorities said. Less than an hour later, the LAFD tweeted that the man had died on the trail at the popular hiking destination. “He was just walking and then he just tumbled and lost consciousness,” John Zahedi, who witnessed the hiker's collapse, told KTLA-TV . Jenny Gittler, a nurse who was on the trail at the time, administered CPR to the man for seven minutes before the EMTs arrived by helicopter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996
2000 Fuller Ave., Hollywood Hills This rustic city park above Hollywood Boulevard was once the sprawling estate of supermarket magnate and financier G. Huntington Hartford and the former retreat of swashbuckling 1940s film star Errol Flynn. The gated park--an animal habitat--attracts joggers, dog-walkers and ambitious hikers who tackle a dirt road that goes all the way to Mulholland Drive.
OPINION
September 25, 2011
As long as people have built homes in Los Angeles near canyon parks or along the seashore, they have had to cope with the fact that their coveted private real estate abuts prized public land. The tension between residents and visitors has escalated recently in the Hollywood Hills, with two neighborhoods taking their complaints to city officials. In the area beneath the Hollywood sign, residents say increasing numbers of tourists drawn to the landmark are clogging narrow streets and causing traffic hazards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1995 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the perfect place for a view home--a rustic prow of land jutting high above the city, surrounded by Runyon Canyon Park on one of the last untouched ridgelines in the eastern Santa Monica Mountains. The wooded property is also shaping up as the first major battleground over a 3-year-old city law designed to protect Mulholland Drive neighborhoods from urban sprawl. This morning, Beverly Hills jeweler Robert W.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | DEAN MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hollywood Hills home of the late Emmy Award-winning director Alan Handley has been offered to the city of Los Angeles as parkland, but city officials say they cannot afford the $4-million price tag. The four-acre property, which offers spectacular views, includes a three-bedroom house designed by Lloyd Wright, the son of famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright. It is surrounded by the city's rustic Runyon Canyon Park, once the sprawling estate of supermarket magnate G.
OPINION
September 25, 2011
As long as people have built homes in Los Angeles near canyon parks or along the seashore, they have had to cope with the fact that their coveted private real estate abuts prized public land. The tension between residents and visitors has escalated recently in the Hollywood Hills, with two neighborhoods taking their complaints to city officials. In the area beneath the Hollywood sign, residents say increasing numbers of tourists drawn to the landmark are clogging narrow streets and causing traffic hazards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s next gated community lies high in the Hollywood Hills on a curvy cul-de-sac that boasts sweeping views, slick, mid-century modern homes and a popular public access point for hikers heading into Runyon Canyon Park. For many years, the nights were quiet on Solar Drive — until an abandoned mansion was overrun by squatters and ravers, and the road became one of the city's most popular spots to park and party. Now, residents spend their mornings armed with trash bags, cleaning up used condoms, beer bottles and drug paraphernalia.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | BILL HIGGINS
A small remnant of the glory that was Hollywood rests in Runyon Canyon Park. Amid the hills on these 133 acres is a well-preserved tennis court--not a crack in it--that seems to await the return of Errol Flynn, in tennis whites, chilled daiquiri in hand. Originally a sprawling private estate--built in 1920 by Carmen Randolph Runyon, rented by Flynn and later owned by A & P supermarket heir Huntington Hartford--the property was all but abandoned during the '60s and '70s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1996
In The Times Valley Edition on Feb. 25, John Diaz of the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy expressed his concerns about environmental impacts of the Metro Rail subway tunnels now under construction between Universal City and Hollywood ("MTA Approach to Subway Plan Disturbing"). He neglected to mention that the conservancy did not participate in the environmental process as it went forward between 1986 and 1989, when the Environmental Impact Review was certified. The EIR is valid and meets all federal requirements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s next gated community lies high in the Hollywood Hills on a curvy cul-de-sac that boasts sweeping views, slick, mid-century modern homes and a popular public access point for hikers heading into Runyon Canyon Park. For many years, the nights were quiet on Solar Drive — until an abandoned mansion was overrun by squatters and ravers, and the road became one of the city's most popular spots to park and party. Now, residents spend their mornings armed with trash bags, cleaning up used condoms, beer bottles and drug paraphernalia.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2008 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
With gasoline prices racing to new highs weekly, it's crunch time for many gyms. Consumers looking to tighten their belts are giving up on tightening their buns in gyms, yoga classes and personal training sessions. Instead, they're exercising the old-fashioned way: sweating for free at the beach, parks or on the street. Canceling a monthly gym membership -- which ranges from about $25 to hundreds of dollars -- may not seem to shave much off the budget. But for some, it's enough. "I know it's next to nothing, but when you're a starving artist, every little bit counts," said Ashley Brooke Moore, an aspiring dancer and actress in her 20s who canceled her $36-a-month membership at Bally's about eight months ago. She then signed up for yoga classes, but when that got too expensive, she quit those and started going to free yoga classes at Runyon Canyon Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
After an impassioned meeting that lasted for hours Wednesday, the Los Angeles Parks and Recreation Commission unanimously voted to approve a parking lot for Runyon Canyon, home to the city's largest off-leash dog park. Those opposed to the lot argued that it would cause more people to use the park, paradoxically creating parking problems for the surrounding neighborhood and increasing traffic and noise as cars lined up to enter.
OPINION
August 7, 2004
I read with dismay the article stating that a parking lot had been approved for Runyon Canyon Park in the Hollywood Hills (July 31). Over the last several years, I have attended dozens of meetings where organizations representing those of us who live near and use the park have voted to oppose paving the lower portion of the park for parking. These include the Outpost Estates Homeowners Assn. (of which I am president), the Hollywood Hills West Neighborhood Council and the Runyon Canyon Park advisory board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2003 | Nita Lelyveld, Times Staff Writer
A day after the city unveiled a plan for Runyon Canyon Park that instantly got dog owners growling, Los Angeles officials said they wanted to hear more from the public before shrinking the area where dogs can roam without leashes. But they said the park needs to be a welcoming place for everyone.
OPINION
March 22, 2003
Regarding "Parking Plan at Dog Park Draws Howls of Protest" (March 15) and Runyon Canyon Park's myriad problems, including overcrowding, ubiquitous dog waste, traffic snarls and a growing animosity between visitors and residents: The article refers to the parking provisions for the park as "limited." This is a comical understatement: 25 spaces for a park that receives hundreds of visitors at peak hours. This is surely the only city facility of its size where local residential streets are forced to bear such an outrageous proportion of the parking burden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2003 | Nita Lelyveld, Times Staff Writer
A day after the city unveiled a plan for Runyon Canyon Park that instantly got dog owners growling, Los Angeles officials said they wanted to hear more from the public before shrinking the area where dogs can roam without leashes. But they said the park needs to be a welcoming place for everyone.
OPINION
March 22, 2003
Regarding "Parking Plan at Dog Park Draws Howls of Protest" (March 15) and Runyon Canyon Park's myriad problems, including overcrowding, ubiquitous dog waste, traffic snarls and a growing animosity between visitors and residents: The article refers to the parking provisions for the park as "limited." This is a comical understatement: 25 spaces for a park that receives hundreds of visitors at peak hours. This is surely the only city facility of its size where local residential streets are forced to bear such an outrageous proportion of the parking burden.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | Leslie Gornstein
How many times have we heard that California is so bountiful that you can reach out your window and pluck your meal from a tree? Being poor and jobless, and having watched the price of lettuce skyrocket, I've determined it's time to do some plucking. Foraging is actually quite the underground tradition in Los Angeles, but it isn't always for the weak.
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