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Rupert Everett

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Rupert Everett has shared his idea of the worst thing ever, and it's - having gay parents? Not that the openly gay actor has gay parents. He actually has a mom who's met his boyfriend but also "still wishes I had a wife and kids," he said.  "She thinks children need a father and a mother and I agree with her," Everett told Britain's Sunday Times Magazine (via the Telegraph ). "I can't think of anything worse than being brought up by two gay dads. " PHOTOS| Gay celebrities: Who's out?
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Rupert Everett has shared his idea of the worst thing ever, and it's - having gay parents? Not that the openly gay actor has gay parents. He actually has a mom who's met his boyfriend but also "still wishes I had a wife and kids," he said.  "She thinks children need a father and a mother and I agree with her," Everett told Britain's Sunday Times Magazine (via the Telegraph ). "I can't think of anything worse than being brought up by two gay dads. " PHOTOS| Gay celebrities: Who's out?
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for Calendar
Bad boy Rupert is nowhere in sight. The British newspaper clippings attest to his grand manner, the sulky posing, the dismissive arrogance, the flamboyantly punkish dress. But, today, laughing as he pulls a large pillow away from his libido-charged Labrador, Rupert Everett is surprisingly low-key, unaffected, accessible. So he's fashionably sockless. So his striped pants are defiantly ripped at the knees. So his natural inclination is to glower at the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2005 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
RUPERT EVERETT is fed up. "I just am in despair about show business lately and the world in general," the British actor declared, morosely picking at a fruit plate on a recent fall morning. "We've all turned into greedy, envious, paranoid monsters in society, really."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rupert Everett is having a bad day. He is seated on a couch in his rented Greenwich Village triplex having his picture taken. The photographer is trying to get him to smile. Everett just stares stonily into the camera. With his chiseled features and sensual lips, he looks like an angry Roman god by way of a motorcycle movie. "It can't be that bad," says one of the crew, trying to lighten things up. It's that bad.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Trying to cheer up gay best pal Robert (Rupert Everett) after the AIDS-related deathof one of his friends, Abbie (Madonna) takes a kitchen moment in "The Next Best Thing" to say she knows just what she wants in the way of funeral arrangements. "Cut me up," she says gaily, "and stuff me in this freezer next to those frozen pizzas for the next 100 years." Any room in that freezer for this inadequate, inauthentic, indigestible film? Chopped up or whole, that's where it belongs.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When "Hello Darling, Are You Working?," by British actor Rupert Everett, was published in England earlier this year, the Times Literary Supplement called the novel "deplorable." That reaction was easy to predict (though it didn't prevent the book's becoming a bestseller): "Hello Darling" would have had to be absolutely first-rate for the stuffy TLS to overlook the fact that the story concerns a homosexual actor-cum-prostitute who rather enjoys his work . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1999 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Venice Beach, a weekday afternoon, the usual carnival of overdone flesh and orange hair, acolytes of the sun and the in-line skate jamming the boardwalk to the tune of boombox rap.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2005 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
RUPERT EVERETT is fed up. "I just am in despair about show business lately and the world in general," the British actor declared, morosely picking at a fruit plate on a recent fall morning. "We've all turned into greedy, envious, paranoid monsters in society, really."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Critics have been raving about Rupert Everett's scene-stealing chicanery in the new romantic comedy, "My Best Friend's Wedding." But the film's producers already knew they had a great performance on their hands. In fact, the suave, openly gay British actor was such a hit with preview audiences that the filmmakers paid him the ultimate compliment: They went back and beefed up his part.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Trying to cheer up gay best pal Robert (Rupert Everett) after the AIDS-related deathof one of his friends, Abbie (Madonna) takes a kitchen moment in "The Next Best Thing" to say she knows just what she wants in the way of funeral arrangements. "Cut me up," she says gaily, "and stuff me in this freezer next to those frozen pizzas for the next 100 years." Any room in that freezer for this inadequate, inauthentic, indigestible film? Chopped up or whole, that's where it belongs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is 73 now, decades removed from his famous films like "Midnight Cowboy," "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" and "Marathon Man," yet Oscar-winning British director John Schlesinger admits he is still unnerved at the prospect of subjecting his latest movie, "The Next Best Thing," to preview test audiences for their post-production critique.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1999 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Venice Beach, a weekday afternoon, the usual carnival of overdone flesh and orange hair, acolytes of the sun and the in-line skate jamming the boardwalk to the tune of boombox rap.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rupert Everett is having a bad day. He is seated on a couch in his rented Greenwich Village triplex having his picture taken. The photographer is trying to get him to smile. Everett just stares stonily into the camera. With his chiseled features and sensual lips, he looks like an angry Roman god by way of a motorcycle movie. "It can't be that bad," says one of the crew, trying to lighten things up. It's that bad.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Critics have been raving about Rupert Everett's scene-stealing chicanery in the new romantic comedy, "My Best Friend's Wedding." But the film's producers already knew they had a great performance on their hands. In fact, the suave, openly gay British actor was such a hit with preview audiences that the filmmakers paid him the ultimate compliment: They went back and beefed up his part.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When "Hello Darling, Are You Working?," by British actor Rupert Everett, was published in England earlier this year, the Times Literary Supplement called the novel "deplorable." That reaction was easy to predict (though it didn't prevent the book's becoming a bestseller): "Hello Darling" would have had to be absolutely first-rate for the stuffy TLS to overlook the fact that the story concerns a homosexual actor-cum-prostitute who rather enjoys his work . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1985 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Times Staff Writer
In the midst of a diatribe against England's Central School of Speech and Drama, actor Rupert Everett stopped mid-sentence to register polite shock at a lampshade hovering outside the window of his fourth-floor suite at the Chateau Marmont. Dangling by a string, it bobbed, jiggled and danced in bizarre greeting for several minutes before being yanked out of sight. "Uh . . . heh, heh," Everett cleared his throat and laughed slightly. "Those are my friends upstairs."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is 73 now, decades removed from his famous films like "Midnight Cowboy," "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" and "Marathon Man," yet Oscar-winning British director John Schlesinger admits he is still unnerved at the prospect of subjecting his latest movie, "The Next Best Thing," to preview test audiences for their post-production critique.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for Calendar
Bad boy Rupert is nowhere in sight. The British newspaper clippings attest to his grand manner, the sulky posing, the dismissive arrogance, the flamboyantly punkish dress. But, today, laughing as he pulls a large pillow away from his libido-charged Labrador, Rupert Everett is surprisingly low-key, unaffected, accessible. So he's fashionably sockless. So his striped pants are defiantly ripped at the knees. So his natural inclination is to glower at the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Not only arguably the worst rock 'n' roll movie of all time, but easily the worst Joe Eszterhas screenplay ever--what better recommendation could a slap-happy masochist need for a hoot-filled night around the video camp "Fire"? If Bob Dylan is slightly credible as a washed-up rocker, try to picture blank, tuneless Rupert Everett as a Time magazine cover superstar whose awful techno-pop inspires New Kids-like hysteria, or Fiona as the 18-year-old airhead discovery--coveted by them both--who, magically, draws screaming sellout crowds to her very first concerts.
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