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Rupert Holmes

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991 | Susan King
Tony Award-winning composer and playwright Rupert Holmes won't spill the beans about the plot of his newest theatrical thriller, "Solitary Confinement," starring Stacy Keach at the Pasadena Playhouse. "What I can give away is that anyone who is expecting me to be in this can rest assured that I make no appearance," Holmes says. "But during intermission of this play, people all look at me smugly. They say, 'Any chance we will be seeing any more of you?'
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2009 | David Ng
A musical version of the 1963 comedy classic "The Nutty Professor" is headed to Broadway, and the director will be none other than Jerry Lewis himself. The comedian, who won't be acting in the musical, has brought on board Marvin Hamlisch to write music and Rupert Holmes to do book and lyrics. Producers are planning on an opening during the 2010-11 Broadway season. Lewis, who turned 83 this year, starred in the original Paramount feature film, which he co-wrote with Bill Richmond.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
L ive has lost its meaning. It signified something once. Live action! Live from Hollywood! Real actors in front of us rather than computer-driven images. Going on live was a show-business merit badge. But true live is seen too rarely. Now we have . . . The melding of dead and living actors in commercials, as chronicled on these pages earlier this week. Network football games where more minutes are spent on multi-angled taped replays than in game-time helmet butting.
BOOKS
July 20, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
"Neo-Dickensian" is the adjective Rupert Holmes' publishers suggest to tout his first novel, and it's apt, up to a point. "Where the Truth Lies" is a big, juicy book with pungent dialogue, vivid description, outsized characters, a convoluted plot and no end of jokes. Moreover, Holmes has an affinity for Charles Dickens: He won multiple Tony awards for adapting the Victorian master's unfinished last novel, "The Mystery of Edwin Drood," into a Broadway hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2009 | David Ng
A musical version of the 1963 comedy classic "The Nutty Professor" is headed to Broadway, and the director will be none other than Jerry Lewis himself. The comedian, who won't be acting in the musical, has brought on board Marvin Hamlisch to write music and Rupert Holmes to do book and lyrics. Producers are planning on an opening during the 2010-11 Broadway season. Lewis, who turned 83 this year, starred in the original Paramount feature film, which he co-wrote with Bill Richmond.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Accomplice" is not so much a whodunit thriller as a spoof of the genre. Anybody who goes to see the revival of Rupert Holmes' 1989 murder mystery at the Long Beach Playhouse Studio Theatre ought to bear this in mind. Otherwise, its convolutions of plot are likely to seem too self-conscious by half. Even as a sendup it exploits the genre's conventions so shamelessly that the characters themselves do not hesitate to remind us we're watching a stagy variation on a theme of "Sleuth" and "Deathtrap."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
As the creator of "The Mystery of Edwin Drood," the 1986 Tony-winning musical, Rupert Holmes is one Holmes who prefers to let you solve the murder for him. When "Drood" bows tonight at Plummer Auditorium in Fullerton, Holmes won't know the identity of the killer until the audience figures it out. And he is venturing no predictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"Drood!," the musical that begins a 20-performance run in the Pasadena Civic Auditorium on Wednesday night (with the official, medals-will-be-worn opening on Saturday night), is the work of Rupert Holmes. Work is the key word. Holmes, a bearded, bespectacled 40-year-old of elfin wit and avalanche drive, wrote the book, the music, the lyrics and the orchestrations: the 650 pages of orchestrations, millions of dots splattered on sheets of barred paper.
BOOKS
July 20, 2003 | Michael Harris, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
"Neo-Dickensian" is the adjective Rupert Holmes' publishers suggest to tout his first novel, and it's apt, up to a point. "Where the Truth Lies" is a big, juicy book with pungent dialogue, vivid description, outsized characters, a convoluted plot and no end of jokes. Moreover, Holmes has an affinity for Charles Dickens: He won multiple Tony awards for adapting the Victorian master's unfinished last novel, "The Mystery of Edwin Drood," into a Broadway hit.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Mystery of Edwin Drood," Rupert Holmes' adaptation of Charles Dickens' unfinished work, is a comic musical salute to the Victorian-Era English music hall. Now playing at the Conejo Players Theater in Thousand Oaks, it couldn't be more fun. Introduced by a master of ceremonies, or "chairman," a troupe of players presents its version of "Drood" with jokes and song-and-dance numbers.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Mystery of Edwin Drood," Rupert Holmes' adaptation of Charles Dickens' unfinished work, is a comic musical salute to the Victorian-Era English music hall. Now playing at the Conejo Players Theater in Thousand Oaks, it couldn't be more fun. Introduced by a master of ceremonies, or "chairman," a troupe of players presents its version of "Drood" with jokes and song-and-dance numbers.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Accomplice" is not so much a whodunit thriller as a spoof of the genre. Anybody who goes to see the revival of Rupert Holmes' 1989 murder mystery at the Long Beach Playhouse Studio Theatre ought to bear this in mind. Otherwise, its convolutions of plot are likely to seem too self-conscious by half. Even as a sendup it exploits the genre's conventions so shamelessly that the characters themselves do not hesitate to remind us we're watching a stagy variation on a theme of "Sleuth" and "Deathtrap."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
L ive has lost its meaning. It signified something once. Live action! Live from Hollywood! Real actors in front of us rather than computer-driven images. Going on live was a show-business merit badge. But true live is seen too rarely. Now we have . . . The melding of dead and living actors in commercials, as chronicled on these pages earlier this week. Network football games where more minutes are spent on multi-angled taped replays than in game-time helmet butting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991 | Susan King
Tony Award-winning composer and playwright Rupert Holmes won't spill the beans about the plot of his newest theatrical thriller, "Solitary Confinement," starring Stacy Keach at the Pasadena Playhouse. "What I can give away is that anyone who is expecting me to be in this can rest assured that I make no appearance," Holmes says. "But during intermission of this play, people all look at me smugly. They say, 'Any chance we will be seeing any more of you?'
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
As the creator of "The Mystery of Edwin Drood," the 1986 Tony-winning musical, Rupert Holmes is one Holmes who prefers to let you solve the murder for him. When "Drood" bows tonight at Plummer Auditorium in Fullerton, Holmes won't know the identity of the killer until the audience figures it out. And he is venturing no predictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
"Drood!," the musical that begins a 20-performance run in the Pasadena Civic Auditorium on Wednesday night (with the official, medals-will-be-worn opening on Saturday night), is the work of Rupert Holmes. Work is the key word. Holmes, a bearded, bespectacled 40-year-old of elfin wit and avalanche drive, wrote the book, the music, the lyrics and the orchestrations: the 650 pages of orchestrations, millions of dots splattered on sheets of barred paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Broadway Bound: Rupert Holmes' new thriller, "Solitary Confinement," will open on Broadway on April 22 at the Ambassador Theatre. The production, starring Stacy Keach, sold out a recent run at the Pasadena Playhouse and opened at San Diego's Spreckels Theatre on Sunday. It moves to the Kennedy Center in Washington next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Solitary' in San Diego: Rupert Holmes' new thriller, "Solitary Confinement," will move from the Pasadena Playhouse to San Diego's Spreckels Theatre for a Jan. 9-26 run, and then on to the Eisenhower Theatre at the Kennedy Center in Washington in late February. A Broadway run has been slated for mid-April 1992, depending on theater availability.
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