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NEWS
July 11, 1992 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cockroaches crawl over the residents' beds at night. Dirt yards are cluttered with debris. Groups of young men stand around drinking all day. Drugs are rampant, rowdiness and violence are common. There is despair and anger. This is Del Rio Mobile Home Park, the ghetto on the riverbanks at the edge of town. "They want the poor to stay in places like this where they won't have to see them," said Michelle Hammond, a 25-year-old woman who lives in a small trailer with her husband and four children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was the baby left in the trash bag. The little girl raped after her first birthday. And the tortured 7-month-old, her tiny face pocked by cockroach and rat bites and her body riddled with bedsores so infected that doctors had to remove part of her leg. All the incidents happened in the desert. All the parents used meth. Much as crack cocaine fueled urban violence in the 1980s, methamphetamine is driving up reports of rural child abuse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was the baby left in the trash bag. The little girl raped after her first birthday. And the tortured 7-month-old, her tiny face pocked by cockroach and rat bites and her body riddled with bedsores so infected that doctors had to remove part of her leg. All the incidents happened in the desert. All the parents used meth. Much as crack cocaine fueled urban violence in the 1980s, methamphetamine is driving up reports of rural child abuse.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cockroaches crawl over the residents' beds at night. Dirt yards are cluttered with debris. Groups of young men stand around drinking all day. Drugs are rampant, rowdiness and violence are common. There is despair and anger. This is Del Rio Mobile Home Park, the ghetto on the riverbanks at the edge of town. "They want the poor to stay in places like this where they won't have to see them," said Michelle Hammond, a 25-year-old woman who lives in a small trailer with her husband and four children.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rattlesnake skin hangs behind the men's toilet at Richvale Cafe. Swedish travel posters spiff up the lunchroom. Blueberry pie baked by somebody's mom waits for dessert. Richvale's lone cafe is run by rice farmers, for the noontime pleasure of rice farmers, in the heart of California rice land. Rice has been sown here in Butte County since 1912, long enough for droughts to be accepted as part of the deal that farmers cut with nature.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The valley is most dramatic at night, when the clear desert air sparkles with an oasis of lights. Street lights, house lights, headlights. They illuminate an inland valley once known best for its touristy antique stores, its rolling vineyards, its wide-open cattle ranges. A couple of side-by-side blinks of towns in the countryside halfway between San Diego and Riverside alongside Interstate 15. Temecula. Murrieta.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the differences between rural and urban Californians, a proposal to split the state in two got a warm reception in the northern hinterlands Tuesday but was headed for defeat in three Bay Area counties.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as harvests follow planting, there is something predictable about the reaction of city folks when they move out to farm country in search of cheaper housing--they complain. Tractors creep along at 5 m.p.h. and clog roads at the height of the commute. Low-flying crop-dusters buzz at dawn and spray who-knows-what near back yards. And there are the flies, dust and odors of farm life.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cockeye Johnson's dusty wagon trail through the Sierra Nevada is now a highway to Lake Tahoe beaches and casinos. Miners paid a fee to use the trail a century ago. Today there is talk, serious talk, of collecting fees again. "You pay $5 to get into Yosemite--why not Tahoe?" said Jim DiPeso, a local activist. Encircled by peaks, and carpeted edge to edge with pine and fir forests, the Tahoe basin is beautiful and wild, but it is no park.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Earl Rocca could wave a wand and stop this city from sprawling, he'd do it, even though he stands to make a hefty sum when his turn comes and developers offer big money for his 40-acre farm, as they surely will. The money aside, Rocca knows that when his grapevines and almond trees at the northwestern edge of town give way to housing tracts, he will lose more than the ground his father once tilled, more than the home where he and his wife raised their three sons.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the differences between rural and urban Californians, a proposal to split the state in two got a warm reception in the northern hinterlands Tuesday but was headed for defeat in three Bay Area counties.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Earl Rocca could wave a wand and stop this city from sprawling, he'd do it, even though he stands to make a hefty sum when his turn comes and developers offer big money for his 40-acre farm, as they surely will. The money aside, Rocca knows that when his grapevines and almond trees at the northwestern edge of town give way to housing tracts, he will lose more than the ground his father once tilled, more than the home where he and his wife raised their three sons.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The valley is most dramatic at night, when the clear desert air sparkles with an oasis of lights. Street lights, house lights, headlights. They illuminate an inland valley once known best for its touristy antique stores, its rolling vineyards, its wide-open cattle ranges. A couple of side-by-side blinks of towns in the countryside halfway between San Diego and Riverside alongside Interstate 15. Temecula. Murrieta.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as harvests follow planting, there is something predictable about the reaction of city folks when they move out to farm country in search of cheaper housing--they complain. Tractors creep along at 5 m.p.h. and clog roads at the height of the commute. Low-flying crop-dusters buzz at dawn and spray who-knows-what near back yards. And there are the flies, dust and odors of farm life.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rattlesnake skin hangs behind the men's toilet at Richvale Cafe. Swedish travel posters spiff up the lunchroom. Blueberry pie baked by somebody's mom waits for dessert. Richvale's lone cafe is run by rice farmers, for the noontime pleasure of rice farmers, in the heart of California rice land. Rice has been sown here in Butte County since 1912, long enough for droughts to be accepted as part of the deal that farmers cut with nature.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cockeye Johnson's dusty wagon trail through the Sierra Nevada is now a highway to Lake Tahoe beaches and casinos. Miners paid a fee to use the trail a century ago. Today there is talk, serious talk, of collecting fees again. "You pay $5 to get into Yosemite--why not Tahoe?" said Jim DiPeso, a local activist. Encircled by peaks, and carpeted edge to edge with pine and fir forests, the Tahoe basin is beautiful and wild, but it is no park.
MAGAZINE
October 9, 1988 | Mary Rourke, Mary Rourke is a Times staff writer
Do clothes created for urbanites have the same appeal in rural areas? The California designers featured here believe that their fashions are for all kinds of people. But we wondered what the folks in Kern County would say. So we carried new fashions by California designers into the wide-open spaces near Bakersfield. Here, the leading industries are agriculture and oil; 43,000 people work outdoors, mostly in blue jeans.
OPINION
January 18, 2004
Re "To the Cougar, Are People Now Fair Game?," Jan. 11: While experts state that the threat of mountain lions has become an increasing problem as development encroaches on rural areas, Southern California has been encroaching on wild areas for the last 100 years. The problem is that there is less wild area, and more mountain lions, especially since Proposition 117 passed in 1990, prohibiting the hunting of mountain lions in California. We are not moving into their territory; they are moving into ours.
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