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NEWS
June 24, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The village children, some with the telltale reddish-brown hair of malnutrition, crowded outside the door of Ma Minglian's cave as she told of her troubles. "The winter wheat died this spring, so then we planted yellow millet," she said. "I'm worried that we may not harvest anything. We have to wait and see how this crop grows."
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NEWS
November 22, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Liu Chunlan's remote hamlet in the rolling hills of Sichuan, the old folks used to tell her that girls were a curse. Raising a daughter only to marry her off to another family was like fattening a hog for someone else's banquet, they'd say. Spending money on a girl was like scattering seed to the wind. Here, as in thousands of villages across China, boys were prized: They did heavy farm labor, bore the family name and cared for their parents in their old age.
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NEWS
November 22, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Liu Chunlan's remote hamlet in the rolling hills of Sichuan, the old folks used to tell her that girls were a curse. Raising a daughter only to marry her off to another family was like fattening a hog for someone else's banquet, they'd say. Spending money on a girl was like scattering seed to the wind. Here, as in thousands of villages across China, boys were prized: They did heavy farm labor, bore the family name and cared for their parents in their old age.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The village children, some with the telltale reddish-brown hair of malnutrition, crowded outside the door of Ma Minglian's cave as she told of her troubles. "The winter wheat died this spring, so then we planted yellow millet," she said. "I'm worried that we may not harvest anything. We have to wait and see how this crop grows."
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Barbie doll is for sale at the Anaheim Toys "R" Us store in a bright cardboard-and-cellophane box labeled "Made in China." The price is $9.99. But how much will China make from the sale of the pert fashion doll marketed around the world by Mattel Inc. of El Segundo? About 35 cents, according to executives in the Asian and American toy industry--mostly in wages paid to 11,000 young peasant women working in two factories across the border from Hong Kong in China's Guangdong province.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has become increasingly apparent with the globalization of fashion that talent resides far beyond the traditional style centers of Manhattan, Milan, Paris and London. Not satisfied to wait at home to be discovered, a large number of fledgling designers from far-flung countries have come here this week to present their clothes during the premiere showcase of American spring fashions.
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