Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRural Areas Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Rural Areas Los Angeles

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1997 | JAMES RICCI
Every time Ramona Moloski looks out her front door, she's reminded of the uniqueness of the neighborhood she chose a quarter-century ago as ideal for raising her four daughters. Never mind that the girls, except for the 19-year-old youngest, are long since gone to adulthood and living elsewhere. Never mind, either, that suburbanization has trapped the little two-block Canoga Park neighborhood in its asphalt-and-concrete grid.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1997 | JAMES RICCI
Every time Ramona Moloski looks out her front door, she's reminded of the uniqueness of the neighborhood she chose a quarter-century ago as ideal for raising her four daughters. Never mind that the girls, except for the 19-year-old youngest, are long since gone to adulthood and living elsewhere. Never mind, either, that suburbanization has trapped the little two-block Canoga Park neighborhood in its asphalt-and-concrete grid.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995 | CYNTHIA FRAZIER
Residents of a Sylmar enclave off the Golden State Freeway are determined to keep their rural lifestyle intact, despite the encroachment of motels and strip malls. Members of the Sylmar Acres Homeowners Assn. are waging a pitched battle against eight property owners who want to rezone their land near the freeway's Roxford Street exit from a rural-agricultural designation to commercial. "We are trying to preserve our way of life," said Barbara Inkman, 61, who lives nearby and owns two horses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995 | CYNTHIA FRAZIER
Residents of a Sylmar enclave off the Golden State Freeway are determined to keep their rural lifestyle intact, despite the encroachment of motels and strip malls. Members of the Sylmar Acres Homeowners Assn. are waging a pitched battle against eight property owners who want to rezone their land near the freeway's Roxford Street exit from a rural-agricultural designation to commercial. "We are trying to preserve our way of life," said Barbara Inkman, 61, who lives nearby and owns two horses.
NEWS
November 5, 1987
Victims of last year's Eastern Sierra earthquake are unhappy with the government formula used to determine who gets aid money, complaining that the formula discriminates against rural areas. While Los Angeles and Orange counties were declared state and federal disaster areas after a devastating 5.9 quake on Oct. 1, residents in Mono County have received no assistance after a 6.2 temblor struck Bishop and the surrounding areas on July 21, 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1990 | GARY GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials, seeking to prevent ground-water contamination, adopted tougher restrictions on septic tanks Monday but stopped short of requiring developers to install sewers in fast-growing rural areas of Los Angeles and Ventura counties. For residents of Acton and Agua Dulce, the California Regional Water Quality Board's decision was a "moderate win," said Charles Brink, a member of the Acton Town Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1990 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new interim ordinance placing strict controls on new apartments and condominiums is the first step in a plan to head off further urban intrusion into Sunland-Tujunga, one of the last semi-rural areas in Los Angeles, City Councilman Joel Wachs said Tuesday. Wachs, who represents the area, said a community plan adopted in 1980 has allowed large, dense apartment buildings to proliferate along Sunland and Foothill boulevards, and Commerce Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meeting in the thick of pro-secession territory, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday night offered residents barbecue and commendations and voted on several actions affecting their neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001
Re "Horse Owners Snort at Home Plan," Feb. 23. As a resident of the neighborhood discussed and a 25-year Chatsworth resident, I have been observing with some amusement the ongoing battles concerning the horse owners in our area. On our rural dirt road, certain resident horse owners have been lobbying somewhat successfully for zoning changes that would permit commercial use of their properties for boarding, lessons, etc. Other residents here have been lobbying against such a change due to the increased traffic and all that goes with it. I have been privy to some nasty behaviors exhibited by the horse owners (insults, shouting, etc.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County could be called the secret capital of Indian America. There are an estimated 60,000 to 80,000 Native Americans, more than in any other U.S. metropolitan area, more than on any reservation--and yet they are invisible to most Angelenos. Today a delegation of American Indians from Los Angeles will travel to Washington to join a meeting with White House officials aimed at raising the profile of urban Indians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1987 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
Twice a week the Pierce College farm pickup truck rolls onto the dirt driveway of the Trafficanda Egg Ranch in Canoga Park. At a loading dock, 150 dozen eggs are stacked in cardboard boxes. Pierce employees carefully load the eggs onto the truck and then return to the Woodland Hills campus, where the eggs go on sale at the school's farmers market. For the past year, half of the "farm-fresh eggs" sold at the Pierce market have come from off campus.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|