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NEWS
June 4, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The message rumbling out of the rural north on Election Day was loud and unmistakably clear: We have had it with California, and we want out. Thirty-one counties voted Tuesday on an advisory measure to chop the state in two, and 27 approved of the idea--with gusto. So what happens now? Not much, most observers agreed. Giddy with victory, the rebellious secessionists vowed Wednesday to push legislation to split the state.
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NEWS
June 4, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The message rumbling out of the rural north on Election Day was loud and unmistakably clear: We have had it with California, and we want out. Thirty-one counties voted Tuesday on an advisory measure to chop the state in two, and 27 approved of the idea--with gusto. So what happens now? Not much, most observers agreed. Giddy with victory, the rebellious secessionists vowed Wednesday to push legislation to split the state.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1998 | Robert A. Rosenblatt and Alissa Rubin
With more than 300,000 Medicare recipients facing loss of their HMO coverage, President Clinton plans to denounce the health plans today for "abandoning" the elderly and will order drafting of legislation to stop the exodus. Clinton will criticize HMOs for breaking "their commitment to Medicare beneficiaries," according to a draft of the statement obtained by The Times. Medicare "should not--and will not--be held hostage to threats by HMOs to leave the program," the statement says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1996
Proposition 197, although billed as a tool to manage the state's mountain lion population, would open the door to sport killing of the animal, giving hunters a chance to nail a cougar skin to the wall. Passage would be a mistake. A no vote is warranted. Six years ago, California voters approved Proposition 117, which gave special status to mountain lions.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1997 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If your boss shows you the door, it's probably your fingers that will do the walking. California is phasing in a phone-in plan for those seeking unemployment benefits. The goal is for regional processing centers to handle 90% of all claims over the telephone by 2000. The plan should make applying for unemployment benefits far easier for laid-off workers: no more humiliating long lines, just a 10-minute call from home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1999 | IOANA PATRINGENARU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of cities across Orange County and the nation are trying to turn residents' fears about the Y2K computer bug into an opportunity for neighborhoods to come together and better protect themselves. Organizers hope to create community networks, with neighbors watching over each other Jan. 1 and well into the millennium. Garden Grove, for example, is co-sponsoring a series of seminars set up by the Crystal Cathedral to explain what could happen in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000 | GARY BLASI, Gary Blasi is a professor at UCLA's School of Law
When I began working in January with a group of law students to investigate conditions in California public schools, I did not expect to have any relevant expertise. Other than being the father of two kids who went through the public schools, I never have been much involved in education issues. Yet it turned out that I did have some relevant expertise: I know a lot about slums and what allows them to exist. What we learned about our schools was profoundly disturbing.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. John Casebeer sees it all in a typical workday. Most of his colleagues from the residency program at UC Irvine Medical School focus on one aspect of medical care. But this family physician, in his third year of residency, tackles myriad procedures each day: checking blood pressure, stitching wounds, administering shots and peering into countless infected ears. Life on the front line of health care gets pretty hectic at times, he admits, but he wouldn't have it any other way.
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