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NEWS
March 21, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
"We can't count on anything, Mike," Ray Philpot said matter-of-factly into the phone Tuesday. "There's a 5:05 p.m., but that may not be here till 8 or 9." Philpot's caller was a local beauty supply salesman looking for a Greyhound bus to take some supplies north to the home office in Fresno. Having struck out, he'd have to drive them there himself and return, wasting an hour and a half.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armando Flores saw opportunity while driving a Greyhound bus last year. A drivers' strike had forced the company to drastically cut service, and Flores, a replacement worker, said he believed that there were enough travelers for another carrier--his own. "I thought there was potential in that business," said Flores, a former truck driver who has won preliminary approval from regulators to run intercity bus service between the Imperial Valley, Los Angeles and San Diego.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armando Flores saw opportunity while driving a Greyhound bus last year. A drivers' strike had forced the company to drastically cut service, and Flores, a replacement worker, said he believed that there were enough travelers for another carrier--his own. "I thought there was potential in that business," said Flores, a former truck driver who has won preliminary approval from regulators to run intercity bus service between the Imperial Valley, Los Angeles and San Diego.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not so much the pastel color scheme or the swaying palm trees that most impressed Angie Sims about the new Greyhound bus terminal in downtown Los Angeles. "This is normal," said Sims, a 29-year-old bartender from Fontana, as she and her 3-year-old daughter munched on bus terminal tacos. In contrast, she described the old terminal as a "crazy place" filled with dirty bathrooms, drug dealers and street people. "This is much, much cleaner," Sims said.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not so much the pastel color scheme or the swaying palm trees that most impressed Angie Sims about the new Greyhound bus terminal in downtown Los Angeles. "This is normal," said Sims, a 29-year-old bartender from Fontana, as she and her 3-year-old daughter munched on bus terminal tacos. In contrast, she described the old terminal as a "crazy place" filled with dirty bathrooms, drug dealers and street people. "This is much, much cleaner," Sims said.
WORLD
September 12, 2004 | Hamida Ghafour, Special to The Times
President Hamid Karzai further solidified his power Saturday by removing one of the nation's most powerful warlords from his governor's post and unveiled a presidential campaign platform in which he promised to rehabilitate Afghanistan's rural economy and establish the rule of law. Karzai chose Sept.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A delayed vote count in Peru's presidential election worsened the country's political crisis Monday, with President Alberto Fujimori apparently close to an outright victory that would allow him to avoid a runoff against challenger Alejandro Toledo. International concern about allegations of foul play, however, prompted the U.S. ambassador to declare support for Peruvian election monitors who say that a first-round victory by Fujimori would be the result of fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven members of a Carlsbad-based humanitarian aid group were taken captive by government forces in Mozambique while delivering medical aid to refugees in the African country, a spokesman for the group said Friday. David Courson, president of the Christian Emergency Relief Team, a politically conservative aid organization, said the abducted group consisted of six Americans and a South African, including a Southern Baptist minister from San Diego who was leading the party.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
"We can't count on anything, Mike," Ray Philpot said matter-of-factly into the phone Tuesday. "There's a 5:05 p.m., but that may not be here till 8 or 9." Philpot's caller was a local beauty supply salesman looking for a Greyhound bus to take some supplies north to the home office in Fresno. Having struck out, he'd have to drive them there himself and return, wasting an hour and a half.
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