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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Sculptor, dissident, activist, blogger, rock 'n' roller, barber. Multi-hyphenate Ai Weiwei wasn't really in need of another descriptor, but now you can add this: actor. The roly-poly, 56-year-old Chinese artist makes his acting debut in a 10-minute sci-fi short called "The Sand Storm" filmed in Beijing in early 2013. The existence of the project wasn't widely known until this week, when the film's writer-director, Jason Wishnow, launched a $33,000 Kickstarter campaign to fund post-production work (it's already exceeded the goal)
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BUSINESS
September 28, 2009 | Ben Fritz
When "Chicago" and "Hairspray" producers Neil Meron and Craig Zadan were looking for their next big movie musical last November, the two ended up in what would seem like an unlikely place: the El Segundo headquarters of Mattel Inc. The duo found their inspiration in the prototypes for an as-yet unreleased line of monster dolls from the toy manufacturer. Welcome to Hollywood's latest gold rush. Movie studio development slates are rapidly filling up with projects based on well-known toys and games.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1993 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer rush of movie images--cliffhangers, dinosaurs, Tom Cruise on the run, Clint Eastwood in a sweat--one should certainly take its memorable place: The sight of Nancy Travis' unguarded face smiling a winsome hello while she slams a meat cleaver into a sheep's skull.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1996 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein is a regular contributor to Calendar
Sitting in his office on a hot day in July, Joe Roth was brooding about summer--the summer of 1997. "You've got 'Lost World,' 'Batman and Robin' and 'Speed 2,' " the chairman of Walt Disney Studios says, barely pausing for breath as he goes along. "Then there's 'Alien 4,' 'Starship Troopers,' 'Men in Black.' " When he stops for a second, you try to help him by throwing out a title. "No, no, I think I got 'em all," he says.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1995 | ELAINE DUTKA
Labor and management are grappling with new technologies and new players. And the decisions they make in the next few months will have far-reaching ramifications. On Wednesday, a three-day meeting of the boards of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists ended with a 128-8 vote in favor of a plan to merge the two groups.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Week after week this summer, Hollywood's blockbuster movies have opened to the kind of eye-popping numbers that get breathlessly splashed across TV and newspaper reports. Often exceeding $40 million, the numbers come packaged with the kind of arcane statistical records Hollywood compiles, such as: best Wednesday ever ("Jurassic Park III"), highest-grossing non-sequel ever ("Pearl Harbor"), best August opening ever ("Rush Hour 2") and second-best three-day total ever ("Planet of the Apes").
NEWS
August 3, 1995 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Come September, America will be spending long evenings with New Yorkers, watching them career about spacious apartments on the Upper West Side and act out on the sidewalks along overcrowded streets. YOU GOTTA PROBLEM WITH THAT? After strip-mining every other setting, including rural America, the Midwest, Beverly Hills and Miami Beach, the networks this fall are offering a heavier than usual ratio of sitcoms and dramas that take place in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH
When director Luis Puenzo made his Oscar-winning film "The Official Story" in 1984, he shot scenes in his own bedroom in a pleasant upper-middle-class Buenos Aires suburb. At night, he slept below his own klieg lights. He spent just $465,000 to make the film, an intimate and searing study of a woman who discovers that her adopted daughter was stolen from a prisoner murdered by military officers during the last Argentine dictatorship.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | MARK SAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Certain that many consumers will be downloading movies from the Internet within a year or two, executives of online firms are for the first time scouring the film market here for movie rights and for partnerships with companies that control film libraries. Their presence, along with some recently announced deals, is sparking a widespread recognition among movie industry leaders that a vast change in the methods of distribution is coming much sooner than they expected.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2001 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just six weeks ago, as the events of Sept. 11 shook America, Hollywood rushed to postpone any terror-related films that might offend public sensibilities, abruptly pulling a number of completed pictures such as the Arnold Schwarzenegger action thriller "Collateral Damage," and the comedies "Big Trouble" and "Bad Company." The World War II drama "Windtalkers" was also pushed back from November to next year because of fears that Americans wouldn't want to see war movies any time soon.
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