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Ruslan I Khasbulatov

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NEWS
November 18, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Election officials Wednesday turned down petitions from voters in a remote Russian district to list imprisoned former Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov on the ballot in Dec. 12 elections for a new legislature. The Central Elections Commission acted on the basis of a decree by President Boris N. Yeltsin, made public Tuesday, that disqualifies from the race all 20 men charged with leading mass anti-government disturbances Oct. 3 and 4.
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NEWS
February 27, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gleeful, unrepentant leaders of the bloody revolt that ended in flames at Russia's White House last October walked out of prison over President Boris N. Yeltsin's belated objections Saturday as an amnesty granted by the new Parliament took effect. Former Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi, former Parliament Chairman Ruslan I.
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NEWS
May 16, 1993 | From Reuters
Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov accused President Boris N. Yeltsin on Saturday of whipping up a constitutional crisis to divert attention from Russia's real problems and warned that it could lead to catastrophe.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Election officials Wednesday turned down petitions from voters in a remote Russian district to list imprisoned former Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov on the ballot in Dec. 12 elections for a new legislature. The Central Elections Commission acted on the basis of a decree by President Boris N. Yeltsin, made public Tuesday, that disqualifies from the race all 20 men charged with leading mass anti-government disturbances Oct. 3 and 4.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the depths of Siberia on Friday, Ruslan I. Khasbulatov, Russia's most powerful conservative, scornfully rejected a "banal" compromise plan offered by President Boris N. Yeltsin, ensuring that this country's political turmoil will roil on. Yeltsin's offer for a truce between warring government branches, Khasbulatov scoffed, will not "play the role of some savior or a messiah."
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's political archrival took a final sharp dig at him Friday just hours before Yeltsin set off for his summit meeting with President Clinton in Vancouver, Canada. In a potent reminder of the domestic troubles that Yeltsin brings today as baggage to the summit, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov said Western leaders have been in too much of a rush to support the Russian president.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Told that their rashness had endangered Russia's unity, lawmakers caved in to enormous pressure from President Boris N. Yeltsin and agreed Friday to give their homeland not just one but two names: "Russian Federation" and "Russia." Less than 24 hours earlier, the Congress of People's Deputies had been swept by a nearly unanimous spasm of patriotic fervor that led members to choose only "Russia."
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, his plan to rule by decree proclaimed illegal Tuesday by Russia's highest court, slipped closer to impeachment proceedings that could begin by the end of this week. Yeltsin's top political foe, Parliament Speaker Ruslan I. Khasbulatov, declared: "It is absolutely clear that there are grounds for initiating the impeachment process. That is without question."
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to quell Russia's political storms, President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday offered his enemies in Parliament a deal--a voluntary limit on both their actions so government ministers could have a free hand to rebuild the country's ravaged economy.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following Moscow's bloodiest political battle since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the leaders of a 13-day parliamentary rebellion surrendered Monday after tanks punched holes in the Russian White House and left it aflame. As the Parliament building burned, hundreds of "White House defenders" streamed out of the blackened marble fortress with their hands on their heads. Soldiers loyal to President Boris N.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | From Reuters
Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov accused President Boris N. Yeltsin on Saturday of whipping up a constitutional crisis to divert attention from Russia's real problems and warned that it could lead to catastrophe.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Boris N. Yeltsin's political archfoe barnstormed through this provincial town Saturday, leaving a slew of promises in his wake--assuming, of course, he will still be around to deliver after a national referendum one week from today. Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov also took hard shots at Yeltsin, accusing the Russian president of being a lackey of the West, overstepping his powers, having ties to organized crime and wanting to raise taxes.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's political archrival took a final sharp dig at him Friday just hours before Yeltsin set off for his summit meeting with President Clinton in Vancouver, Canada. In a potent reminder of the domestic troubles that Yeltsin brings today as baggage to the summit, Parliament Chairman Ruslan I. Khasbulatov said Western leaders have been in too much of a rush to support the Russian president.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin warned Russians on Thursday that covert plans to overthrow him are being put into action, but there was a sign that the tide may be turning in his favor when his archrival backed off from calls that he be impeached. Apparently affected by predictions that an attempt to dump Russia's first popularly elected president could not garner the two-thirds majority of Parliament that it needs to pass, the Speaker of the Congress of People's Deputies, Ruslan I.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, his plan to rule by decree proclaimed illegal Tuesday by Russia's highest court, slipped closer to impeachment proceedings that could begin by the end of this week. Yeltsin's top political foe, Parliament Speaker Ruslan I. Khasbulatov, declared: "It is absolutely clear that there are grounds for initiating the impeachment process. That is without question."
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin backed away Tuesday from an electoral test of strength with conservative lawmakers by dropping his insistence on an April referendum that he had hoped would bolster his executive powers. Instead, he called for "a year of moratorium on all political fistfighting" to let Russia stabilize its plummeting economy, followed by elections of lawmakers in 1994 and a new president in 1995--each a year ahead of schedule.
NEWS
February 17, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, all but abandoning a plan to take his case for accelerated reform directly to the people, called Tuesday for an emergency parliamentary session next month to ratify a power-sharing accord to be negotiated with his chief political foe. At a 20-minute evening meeting at the Kremlin, Yeltsin and Supreme Soviet Chairman Ruslan I.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, his authority at its lowest ebb, was assailed Thursday by Russia's Parliament chief and abandoned by the nation's top judge as his allies warned that a law awaiting final approval today could prove fatal to Russian reforms. The Congress of People's Deputies voted 672-116 in principle for a law to restrict presidential powers, in effect resolving the tug of war between Yeltsin and the legislature squarely in favor of the latter and its chief, Ruslan I. Khasbulatov.
NEWS
February 20, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the depths of Siberia on Friday, Ruslan I. Khasbulatov, Russia's most powerful conservative, scornfully rejected a "banal" compromise plan offered by President Boris N. Yeltsin, ensuring that this country's political turmoil will roil on. Yeltsin's offer for a truce between warring government branches, Khasbulatov scoffed, will not "play the role of some savior or a messiah."
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