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Ruslan S Aushev

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NEWS
August 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruslan S. Aushev, president of the Russian republic of Ingushetia, says he doesn't need a second bride, because his wife has already given him a male heir. But that shouldn't keep other men from taking additional wives, he says, and so he signed a decree last month legalizing the practice of polygyny--that would be multiple wives, of course, not husbands--in his southern Islamic republic.
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NEWS
August 15, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruslan S. Aushev, president of the Russian republic of Ingushetia, says he doesn't need a second bride, because his wife has already given him a male heir. But that shouldn't keep other men from taking additional wives, he says, and so he signed a decree last month legalizing the practice of polygyny--that would be multiple wives, of course, not husbands--in his southern Islamic republic.
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NEWS
January 15, 2000 | MAYERBEK NUNAYEV and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chechen civilians who have been stuck at border checkpoints for days won the backing of the United Nations on Friday in protesting Russia's policy of restricting the movement of Chechen males ages 10 to 60. Russian officials pledged to modify the travel ban, and some men of fighting age from Chechnya reportedly were allowed to cross from the war-torn separatist republic into the neighboring republic of Ingushetia on Friday.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia intensified its bombardment of the rebel capital of Grozny on Saturday, unleashing wave after wave of rocket and bomb attacks that local officials said left hundreds of civilians dead. Residents have so far reported 260 deaths since the new Russian assault on the Chechen capital began two days ago, Grozny Mayor Lecha Dudayev told the Interfax news agency. He said he expects the final tally to be twice as large.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elections that were supposed to confirm peace in the separatist region of Chechnya--after almost two years of war with Russia's army--are turning into a violent free-for-all of mysterious kidnappings, vicious political mud-slinging and threats of further armed conflict. Ruslan S.
WORLD
September 3, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Sporadic gunfire rang out Thursday from a school where armed militants held hundreds of children and teachers hostage, but the attackers released 26 women and children and Russian officials conducted their first face-to-face negotiations with the guerrillas in an attempt to end the crisis. As thousands of family members milled in tense uncertainty outside the cordon around the North Ossetia middle school, there were fears that the two-day standoff would end in violence.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian troops, already under a cloud of suspicion for large-scale detentions and alleged torture of civilians in Chechnya, have been accused of desecrating a treasured centuries-old stone church and tower in the neighboring republic of Ingushetia. "Barbarism," Kureysh Buzurtanov, a spokesman for Ingush President Ruslan S. Aushev, said Tuesday.
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They would like to go home, and the Russian government says it wants them to head that way too. But so far, there has been no significant movement among the about 335,000 civilians displaced by war in Chechnya. "Even if they drove us from here, we have no place to go back to," said Mosha Shakhgeriyeva, a mother of six. "I'm not taking my kids to Grozny [the Chechen capital] to be blown up or maybe shot by snipers."
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russians consider the border with war-torn Chechnya open for refugees, and it is--for those who want to go back and brave the Russian bombs raining on the separatist republic. But for the desperate thousands waiting in a miles-long column to get out of Chechnya, the road to escape is effectively closed. Of those thousands, only a trickle is being allowed to pass through to safety each day.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all seems familiar: Warplanes deliver airstrikes that pound enemy forces entrenched in war-torn Eastern Europe. So-called smart bombs destroy oil refineries, munitions dumps and communications installations. Tens of thousands of refugees flee into neighboring republics as local leaders warn of a humanitarian catastrophe. Thousands of troops mass at the border even as officials say they do not plan to launch a ground invasion.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came to the showdown carrying every weapon they could. On one side stood five dozen men, fingers ready on triggers. Staring back at them across a bleak stretch of grass and sparse shrubs were a couple of hundred warriors, guns raised, holding an emaciated prisoner. Magomed Keligov waited. His face was gray and gaunt, his hair shaggy, his legs shackled. He had seen the sun just once in nearly 12 months. Most of that time he had been fastened to the wall of a cellar by a yard-long chain.
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