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Rusman Gunawan

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June 22, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Rusman Gunawan, brother of alleged international terrorist Hambali, went on trial Monday on charges that he helped finance the suicide car bombing at the Jakarta J.W. Marriott Hotel, which killed 12 people in August. In a courtroom crowded with journalists and Gunawan's supporters, prosecutors read a seven-page indictment accusing the 26-year-old of helping transfer as much as $50,000 to the Marriott bombers while he was living in Pakistan.
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WORLD
June 22, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Rusman Gunawan, brother of alleged international terrorist Hambali, went on trial Monday on charges that he helped finance the suicide car bombing at the Jakarta J.W. Marriott Hotel, which killed 12 people in August. In a courtroom crowded with journalists and Gunawan's supporters, prosecutors read a seven-page indictment accusing the 26-year-old of helping transfer as much as $50,000 to the Marriott bombers while he was living in Pakistan.
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WORLD
September 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani police said they had captured the younger brother of Hambali, Osama bin Laden's alleged point man in Southeast Asia, in an arrest that may help unravel Al Qaeda's links to the Jemaah Islamiah terrorist group. Rusman Gunawan, an Indonesian, was among 17 students detained Saturday in raids on three Islamic schools in Karachi. Hambali, 39, whose real name is Riduan Isamuddin, was arrested Aug. 11 in Thailand.
WORLD
October 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An Indonesian court sentenced the younger brother of jailed cleric and alleged Southeast Asian terrorist leader Hambali to four years in jail on charges of helping finance last year's suicide bombing at the JW Marriott Hotel in Jakarta. Rusman Gunawan, one of four Indonesian students deported from Pakistan in December, was found guilty by a three-judge panel of violating the country's anti-terrorism law.
WORLD
December 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
Six convicted Islamic militants testified Thursday that they knew of hard-line Indonesian cleric Abu Bakar Bashir but could not say whether he led the regional Jemaah Islamiah terrorist group, as prosecutors charge. It was the latest setback for the prosecution's case against Bashir, who is accused of heading the Al Qaeda affiliate allegedly behind the 2002 bombings that killed 202 on Indonesia's Bali island and last year's attack on the Marriott hotel in the capital, Jakarta, that killed 12.
WORLD
April 11, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
It is visiting hour at Salemba Prison and the most famous inmate in Cellblock A sits on a sheet of vinyl on the concrete floor, holding court. Surrounded by a dozen followers, assistants and journalists, Islamic cleric Abu Bakar Bashir expounds on the views that helped land him in prison and demonstrates that being behind bars is no impediment to spreading his message of holy war.
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