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Russ Cletta

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MAGAZINE
January 19, 2003 | Susan Heeger
It's not hard to overdo a garden. ''Too many things going on in a small area produces a restless quality which will leave the onlooker dissatisfied,'' wrote landscape architect Thomas Church in his classic 1955 book, ''Gardens Are for People.'' A preeminent gardener of mid-century California, Church presented an alternative to overkill, what he called ''a green oasis.'
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MAGAZINE
January 19, 2003 | Susan Heeger
It's not hard to overdo a garden. ''Too many things going on in a small area produces a restless quality which will leave the onlooker dissatisfied,'' wrote landscape architect Thomas Church in his classic 1955 book, ''Gardens Are for People.'' A preeminent gardener of mid-century California, Church presented an alternative to overkill, what he called ''a green oasis.'
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MAGAZINE
May 22, 2005 | Barbara Thornburg
Architect Steven Shortridge's living room has sky for a ceiling. The 16-by-20-foot outdoor room he calls his "front-side yard" is nearly half the size of his Lilliputian (750 square feet) Venice home. "Having a room open to the sky and air was more important to me than having more inside space," he says. The one-bedroom house faces the street, a former Venice canal that was filled in in the late '20s.
MAGAZINE
March 28, 2004 | Susan Heeger
If Randee St. Nicholas had her way, you'd have to hack a path from her garden gate to her front door with a machete. Vines, hedges and weeping trees lend a forgotten feeling to the garden of her Hollywood Hills home. Inside, exotic rugs, lamps, mirrors, antique tables and chairs create an otherworldly range of colors and textures. St. Nicholas, a photographer and director of music videos, commercials and films, chose the Mediterranean-style house for its 1920s pedigree and its three-quarter-acre garden, overgrown even when she bought it a decade ago. Once settled, she began filling the home's interior and exterior with furnishings, statues and beds collected on worldwide photography trips.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | Susan Heeger
Noisy days and nights in a cramped house on a busy street: Such is life for many in our auto-centric city. But it doesn't have to be like this. Cheryl and Matthew Erramouspe, an FAA inspector and her entertainment lawyer husband, live at the intersection of two Venice commuter roads. Though traffic does speed by, it's muted by a wall of bamboo, which gives the couple a view of green, red and silver leaves.
MAGAZINE
May 22, 2005 | Susan Heeger
When Russ Cletta moves out of his Venice rental house, he'll take his patio with him, unscrewing deck beams, dismantling fences and packing up pots. A landscape architect and co-owner of the Venice design firm Griffith & Cletta, he couldn't bear to forgo a garden--even on land that wasn't his--when he signed a lease in 1999. But for the same reason, he didn't want to spend big money on permanent construction projects.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
It's time for our annual list of spring garden tours and events, for all you planners. Be sure to check organizers' websites for more information and updates, because some events do sell out. Additions to the list and suggestions are welcome via reader comments. April 6-7: More than 40 gardens, each planted with at least 50% California native plants, will be featured in the 10th annual self-guided tour organized by the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants . 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days.
MAGAZINE
February 29, 2004 | Susan Heeger
Courtyards were history's earliest garden rooms. Egyptians built them, Greeks paved them with stone, Romans set them off with colonnades, and for the same reasons the Persians loved them, so do we. Cooled by a fountain, they're a blessing in a hot climate. Their walls shut out the street, the neighbor's dogs, the howl of the Santa Anas. They give us frontyards we can use and invite us to enjoy them--for reading, lolling, feeling cosseted and soothed.
HOME & GARDEN
April 12, 2014 | Anne Colby
Rustic Canyon's sylvan beauty and funky charm cast its spell on Jill Soffer a dozen years ago. She liked the neighborhood's relaxed environment and abundance of sycamore trees and purchased a home there in 2002. "There's all this green around. It's not too manicured," Soffer said appreciatively. "People are easygoing, everything is a little overgrown, and the creek in the middle of everything is a little shaggy. You can hear the frogs at night. " She planned to renovate her 1920s three-bedroom house, but hadn't yet when she met and then in 2008 married Greg Adler, who had two young sons.
HOME & GARDEN
April 29, 2004 | KT Harris, Special to The Times
In Venice, a "Keep Off the Grass" sign would be pretty much moot. Here, where lot sizes invite comparisons to postage stamps, the symbol of suburban excess -- the expansive green lawn -- is almost nowhere evident. On Saturday, 31 private gardens will be open for the 10th anniversary of the annual Venice Garden Tour, and "easily 80% to 85% of them don't have grass," says Jan Brilliot, who is co-chairing the event with landscape designer Jay Griffith.
MAGAZINE
February 8, 2004 | Jan Weimer, Jan Weimer is a kitchen designer and author of "Kitchen Redos, Revamps, Remodels + Replacements without Murder, Suicide or Divorce" (William Morrow, 1997).
Imagine a blueprint of your dream kitchen. For a Modernist, it might feature stark white Corian counters with stainless steel Sub-Zero appliances. For a traditionalist, perhaps an enamel and polished brass La Cornue range with gas burners, plate warmers and a barbecue grill. Surround-sound speakers might softly pipe Act I of "La Traviata," or blare a Laker game from your 50-inch plasma TV. If you can imagine it, it can be built--for a price.
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