Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRuss Columbo
IN THE NEWS

Russ Columbo

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1996 | Cecilia Rasmussen
At the height of Hollywood's Golden Age he was one of the town's most sought-after bachelors. He was a crooner and Valentino look-alike with flashing eyes and a smile that could charm a sphinx. His composition, "Prisoner of Love," became his vocal trademark. He was taller than his principal competitor--Bing Crosby--and most Hollywood insiders considered him more handsome, better dressed and more formidable at the microphone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
December 26, 2004 | Anthony Heilbut, Anthony Heilbut is the author of several books, including "Exiled in Paradise" and "The Gospel Sound."
According to Lenny Kaye, the three great pop crooners of the early 1930s constitute a trinity. Bing Crosby, the affable domesticator of every idiom from light jazz to Hawaiian music, plays the universal dad. Randy, rambunctious Rudy Vallee enacts the misbehaving son. And, by default, Russ Columbo (1908-1934), the least known, the handsomest, the most vocally gifted and soulful, assumes the role of Holy Ghost.
Advertisement
BOOKS
December 26, 2004 | Anthony Heilbut, Anthony Heilbut is the author of several books, including "Exiled in Paradise" and "The Gospel Sound."
According to Lenny Kaye, the three great pop crooners of the early 1930s constitute a trinity. Bing Crosby, the affable domesticator of every idiom from light jazz to Hawaiian music, plays the universal dad. Randy, rambunctious Rudy Vallee enacts the misbehaving son. And, by default, Russ Columbo (1908-1934), the least known, the handsomest, the most vocally gifted and soulful, assumes the role of Holy Ghost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1996 | Cecilia Rasmussen
At the height of Hollywood's Golden Age he was one of the town's most sought-after bachelors. He was a crooner and Valentino look-alike with flashing eyes and a smile that could charm a sphinx. His composition, "Prisoner of Love," became his vocal trademark. He was taller than his principal competitor--Bing Crosby--and most Hollywood insiders considered him more handsome, better dressed and more formidable at the microphone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Hollywood Before the Code," the UCLA Film Archives' provocative survey of early talkies made before the severe 1934 revision of the Production Code, continues Thursday in Melnitz Theater at 8 p.m. with "Broadway Thru a Keyhole" (1933).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1991 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michael Feinstein is a sly one. He comes out on stage looking for all the world like a reincarnation of a classic movie juvenile lead. Slicked-back Dick Powell hair, flashing Russ Columbo eyes, a smile that would charm the Sphinx--you half expect him to throw on a raccoon coat and start singing the Notre Dame fight song. But Feinstein's got bigger plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1997
Don Heckman's much-warranted article on cabaret's renaissance ("Rosie's Got Her Groove Back," March 2) did not include information on two Los Angeles-based organizations that are aiding in the art form's renewed popularity. Cabaret West, which I founded, is an organization of over 200 cabaret performers, presenters and patrons. It produces several concerts each year in addition to sponsoring workshops and meetings on the art and business of cabaret. Los Angeles is also host to the only free community outreach series devoted to educating the public in the art of cabaret.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Despite the impact of Elvis Presley and the rock revolution in the second half of the '50s, traditional pop singers--from Nat (King) Cole to Frank Sinatra--remained major sales forces in pop music during that period. Of them, Perry Como--the former barber from Pennsylvania who sang in a relaxed crooning style that was greatly influenced by Bing Crosby and Russ Columbo--was the hottest on the charts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Time s ' pop music critic. and
Elvis Presley may have defined rock for most Americans in the '50s, but James Brown grabbed hold of the roll in the '60s and infused it with such electricity and heat that the music world had to come up with a new name for his combustible rhythm: funk.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jimmy McPartland, a trumpeter and cornetist in the legendary tradition of Bix Beiderbecke and a major influence on the frenetic school of Chicago jazz, died of cancer Wednesday. His wife, pianist and composer Marian McPartland, said he was 83 and died at their Long Island, N.Y., home. She and McPartland had divorced in 1970 after 25 years of marriage but were remarried just two weeks ago when his death became imminent. She added that he will be cremated and buried near his mother in Chicago.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | BURT A. FOLKART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Arthur Tracy, radio's beloved balladeer whose songs of love and life helped Americans celebrate the prosperity of the 1920s and brought them solace through the deprivations of the Great Depression, has died. The self-proclaimed "Street Singer" was 98 when he died in a New York City hospital Sunday. He had lived for many years in Manhattan. His death ends the era of radio crooners that included Russ Columbo, Rudy Vallee and Bing Crosby, a more innocent time in U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Special to The Times
THE road trip is an essential American experience that has inspired books, movies and television programs, including "The Grapes of Wrath," "Route 66" and "Thelma & Louise."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|