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Russ Hodges

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times
Bobby Thomson, who hit the legendary home run dubbed "the shot heard round the world" for the New York Giants and inspired perhaps the most famous broadcasting moment in baseball history, has died. He was 86. Thomson, who had been in poor health for several years, died Monday night at his home in Savannah, Ga., according to various media reports. The Brooklyn Dodgers were two outs from the 1951 National League championship when Thomson hit his dramatic home run, sending the Giants to the World Series and sending broadcaster Russ Hodges into hysteria as he repeatedly screamed into his microphone: "The Giants win the pennant!
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SPORTS
October 25, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
Hey, L.A. baseball fans. We didn't see this one coming, did we? It kind of hit us over the head like Juan Marichal's bat, didn't it? The San Francisco Giants and the Texas Rangers are in the World Series. It was supposed to be the New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies again. We could have lived with that. We could just ignore the whole thing and chalk it up to another East Coast conspiracy. We could scoff at the Yankees for buying more postseason glory and further ruining whatever pretense there once was of competitive balance in the major leagues.
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SPORTS
August 25, 2010 | Baxter Holmes
It's the author of the most infamous pitch in Dodgers history, and a reporter, sitting at a Beverly Hills deli around 9 a.m. And just after the pitcher orders breakfast — an omelet, bagel and hot tea — Larry King walks over. King, a Brooklyn native, knows the pitcher from when the Dodgers played in his hometown. The two make small talk, reminisce, then, just before King heads back to his table, he turns to a friend and says, "People forget what a great pitcher he was. " The pitcher, Ralph Branca, 84, nods, sighs and replies, "Nobody knows that.
SPORTS
August 25, 2010 | Baxter Holmes
It's the author of the most infamous pitch in Dodgers history, and a reporter, sitting at a Beverly Hills deli around 9 a.m. And just after the pitcher orders breakfast — an omelet, bagel and hot tea — Larry King walks over. King, a Brooklyn native, knows the pitcher from when the Dodgers played in his hometown. The two make small talk, reminisce, then, just before King heads back to his table, he turns to a friend and says, "People forget what a great pitcher he was. " The pitcher, Ralph Branca, 84, nods, sighs and replies, "Nobody knows that.
SPORTS
November 19, 1995 | DICK BRINSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The computer screen went through its machinations as "Old Time Baseball" booted to life. Suddenly, the Polo Grounds appeared. And a baby boomer too young at the time to understand the gloom that engulfed a Brooklyn Dodgers household that dark October afternoon 44 years ago was about to right the wrong, via computer. This time, Ralph Branca would throw Bobby Thomson a curve ball. This time, the late Russ Hodges would have to change his tune. "Branca throws. There's a long drive.
SPORTS
October 25, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
Hey, L.A. baseball fans. We didn't see this one coming, did we? It kind of hit us over the head like Juan Marichal's bat, didn't it? The San Francisco Giants and the Texas Rangers are in the World Series. It was supposed to be the New York Yankees and Philadelphia Phillies again. We could have lived with that. We could just ignore the whole thing and chalk it up to another East Coast conspiracy. We could scoff at the Yankees for buying more postseason glory and further ruining whatever pretense there once was of competitive balance in the major leagues.
SPORTS
October 15, 1987 | Mike Downey
The Giants don't win the pennant! The Giants don't win the pennant! The Giants don't win the pennant! --With apologies to Russ Hodges. Oh, how it could have been 1951 all over again. Oh, how these Giants could have been like those Giants. Those Giants had Leo Durocher escorting runners from his third-base coaching box all the way to home plate. These Giants had Don Zimmer doing it. Those Giants had Bobby Thomson. These Giants had Robby Thompson.
SPORTS
August 31, 2002
I love Vin Scully to death, but if I have to listen to him constantly remind us during a Dodger game about how many home runs Barry Bonds has hit in the Giants' game again, I think I'm going to throw up. Enough with the updates already. I couldn't care less how many homers Barry has. Brian Musgrove Moorpark
SPORTS
February 4, 2001 | THOMAS BOSWELL, WASHINGTON POST
Bobby Thomson's Shot Heard 'Round The World has been chosen the greatest moment in baseball history by The Sporting News and the second-greatest sports moment of the 20th century by Sports Illustrated. Now, the Wall Street Journal is calling it something else: perhaps the final illustration of 10 weeks of cheating by Leo Durocher's 1951 New York Giants. For 50 years, Thomson has been baseball's ideal clutch hero and Ralph Branca the game's most symbolic goat.
SPORTS
August 17, 1990
Memorial services for former Olympic gold medalist Dallas Bixler will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Mark's United Methodist Church in Anaheim. Bixler, 80, died of natural causes at a rest home in Buena Park Monday. Bixler, who won the gold medal on the horizontal bar in the 1932 Games in Los Angeles, was the oldest surviving gold medalist in the United States. Bixler had taught in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times
Bobby Thomson, who hit the legendary home run dubbed "the shot heard round the world" for the New York Giants and inspired perhaps the most famous broadcasting moment in baseball history, has died. He was 86. Thomson, who had been in poor health for several years, died Monday night at his home in Savannah, Ga., according to various media reports. The Brooklyn Dodgers were two outs from the 1951 National League championship when Thomson hit his dramatic home run, sending the Giants to the World Series and sending broadcaster Russ Hodges into hysteria as he repeatedly screamed into his microphone: "The Giants win the pennant!
SPORTS
August 31, 2002
I love Vin Scully to death, but if I have to listen to him constantly remind us during a Dodger game about how many home runs Barry Bonds has hit in the Giants' game again, I think I'm going to throw up. Enough with the updates already. I couldn't care less how many homers Barry has. Brian Musgrove Moorpark
SPORTS
November 19, 1995 | DICK BRINSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The computer screen went through its machinations as "Old Time Baseball" booted to life. Suddenly, the Polo Grounds appeared. And a baby boomer too young at the time to understand the gloom that engulfed a Brooklyn Dodgers household that dark October afternoon 44 years ago was about to right the wrong, via computer. This time, Ralph Branca would throw Bobby Thomson a curve ball. This time, the late Russ Hodges would have to change his tune. "Branca throws. There's a long drive.
SPORTS
October 15, 1987 | Mike Downey
The Giants don't win the pennant! The Giants don't win the pennant! The Giants don't win the pennant! --With apologies to Russ Hodges. Oh, how it could have been 1951 all over again. Oh, how these Giants could have been like those Giants. Those Giants had Leo Durocher escorting runners from his third-base coaching box all the way to home plate. These Giants had Don Zimmer doing it. Those Giants had Bobby Thomson. These Giants had Robby Thompson.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | GARY LIBMAN
Baseball cards now talk. Starting April 1, SPORTSTALK will sell a battery-run player and four cards that include such recorded offerings as Orel Hershiser's advice to the young, Hank Aaron's motivation for setting baseball's home run record and announcer Russ Hodges' call of Bobby Thomson's pennant-winning home run for the New York Giants in 1951--the exultation "The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're a Dodger fan, it still cuts deeply to hear announcer Russ Hodges yell those immortal words, "The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!" At the risk of reopening old wounds, make it a point to catch "Shot Heard 'Round the World" (8 p.m. HBO), a nifty, nostalgic documentary recalling the dramatic ninth-inning home run that Bobby Thomson hit against Ralph Branca, leading the New York Giants to a stunning playoff victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1951.
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