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Russ Parsons

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FOOD
April 7, 1999
Russ Parsons is the new editor of the Los Angeles Times Food section. Parsons, who has worked at The Times since 1991 and served for several years as deputy editor, writes the In the Kitchen and In Season columns. Before joining the Food section, Parsons was food editor at the Los Angeles Times Syndicate. Before that, he edited the food section of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner. Parsons replaces Laurie Ochoa, who had edited the section since 1993.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 16, 2013 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Total time: 1 hour, 30 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Silky stuffed eggplant is a wonderfully satisfying dish for casual late summer and early fall entertaining. It can be made in advance and reheated just before serving. 3 (about 1 pound each) round dark purple eggplants 2 medium onions 1/4cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons minced garlic 2 ( 1/2-pound) lamb shoulder chops, or 3/4 pound lamb stew meat 3 1/3cups crushed tomatoes 1/4cup toasted pine nuts 1/2cup chopped parsley 1 ounce Pecorino Romano cheese, grated 1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees.
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FOOD
August 18, 2012
Talk about cooking zucchini and the first question most people ask is "What size?" The real answer is: "Whatta ya got?" Tiny zucchini look great on the plate but haven't developed their full flavor. Braise them whole to take advantage of their appearance. Huge zucchini (yeah, we know, you went on vacation) are watery and seedy, but they are really terrific stuffed. Cut them in 3-inch crosswise sections and use a melon baller to scoop out all but about 1/3 to 1/2 inch of pulp, making a cup. Medium-sized zucchini (6 or 7 inches)
FOOD
August 18, 2012
Talk about cooking zucchini and the first question most people ask is "What size?" The real answer is: "Whatta ya got?" Tiny zucchini look great on the plate but haven't developed their full flavor. Braise them whole to take advantage of their appearance. Huge zucchini (yeah, we know, you went on vacation) are watery and seedy, but they are really terrific stuffed. Cut them in 3-inch crosswise sections and use a melon baller to scoop out all but about 1/3 to 1/2 inch of pulp, making a cup. Medium-sized zucchini (6 or 7 inches)
FOOD
March 15, 2000
In this week's Sunday Magazine, Russ Parsons is hot on the the col-cut trail in Friuli, finding artisanal hams and prosciutto made from goose.
FOOD
May 25, 2005
I read with interest the California Cook article ["Eats Shoots, Leaves," by Russ Parsons, May 18]. I am impressed with the stroke of food genius that hit Russ Parsons in the grocery line. It is clear why he is on the Food section staff. I do enjoy his articles. I also very much enjoy David Shaw's articles. I like all of the Food section, but those are my two consistent favorites. Pier Avirom Whittier
FOOD
February 6, 2008
TOTALLY awesome to see an article about Marshall Store. [The California Cook, by Russ Parsons, Jan. 30 ]. I'd never had barbecued oysters and found them to be delicious. I think [the two of us] consumed 40 oysters -- raw, Rockefellered, barbecued . . . . I think I need to go to the Water Grill for dinner now. Susan Lee Los Angeles
FOOD
January 15, 2003
CALIFORNIA'S navel orange harvest is in full swing, and it hasn't looked this good in years. There are almost 500 oranges on every tree -- the highest "fruit set" in a decade. And on top of that, this year's harvest is predicted to be 20% bigger (and even sweeter) than last year's. Russ Parsons turns a cook's eye to the bounty, and journeys far beyond the juice. Page 3
FOOD
March 29, 2006
THANK you to Russ Parsons for the wonderful, playful tone you bring to food writing. I consistently find myself laughing and promptly e-mailing your pieces to my foodie friends and my language-loving, polyglot father. And, of course, cooking recipes from them later in the week. Joy in food is such a good thing, and sharing it through your writing is pure pleasure. CAMERON BLAKE HOLTZ Charlotte, N.C.
FOOD
October 6, 2004
I felt compelled to write after reading "Straight From the Farm" [Sept. 22] by Russ Parsons. He criticized Fresno again and again, referring to it as a "culinary desert" and describing the difficulties of operating a classy establishment like Echo in such a hick town. I lived in Fresno most of my life. I think part of Echo's appeal is its Central Valley location. If it were in L.A. or the Bay Area, it might be just another tiny blip on California's vast epicurean radar screen. Dianne Keeney San Diego
FOOD
February 6, 2008
TOTALLY awesome to see an article about Marshall Store. [The California Cook, by Russ Parsons, Jan. 30 ]. I'd never had barbecued oysters and found them to be delicious. I think [the two of us] consumed 40 oysters -- raw, Rockefellered, barbecued . . . . I think I need to go to the Water Grill for dinner now. Susan Lee Los Angeles
FOOD
January 30, 2008 | Russ Parsons
Finding a decent assortment of fresh oysters can be a challenge at even the best fish markets. But with just a little planning, that's not a problem. Oysters ship remarkably well, and at the website for Taylor Shellfish Farms on Puget Sound you can order your choice of Virginicas, Pacifics, Kumamotos and Olympias -- or a mix of all four -- and they'll be on your doorstep in just a couple of days. Even better, order one of their gift boxes and you'll also get an oyster knife, shucking instructions and a copy of seafood maven Jon Rowley's essay on the art of eating an oyster.
FOOD
January 16, 2008 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
  WHAT'S the perfect Northern California getaway? Beautiful views, rambling beachfront garden and, of course, delicious blackberry scones served with breakfast. The scones at Alegria Oceanfront Inn & Cottages in the coastal town of Mendocino are a big draw for columnist Russ Parsons. "These scones have the perfect texture: firm, but slightly crumbly," Parsons says. "And the flavor is just sweet enough without being overpowering. " Blackberry scones Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 12 Note: Adapted from a recipe by innkeepers Eric and Elaine Wing Hillesland at the Alegria Oceanfront Inn & Cottages in Mendocino.
BOOKS
May 20, 2007 | Bryan Miller, Bryan Miller, a former New York Times restaurant critic and food writer, is the author of "Cooking for Dummies" and "Desserts for Dummies."
ALONG a rural two-lane road linking my childhood home in northwestern New Jersey with my high school stood a tumbledown farm stand called Patsy's. The eponymous enterprise was administered by a short, spherical woman with a gimpy leg and a startling dearth of dentition. Every August, big wicker baskets overflowed with majestic Jersey tomatoes in all their sweet and pulpy grandeur, followed by tree-ripened peaches as akin to today's fuzzy bocce balls as a church picnic is to Mardi Gras.
FOOD
January 24, 2007
WHAT a relief I felt after reading your article "Parlez-Vous Brasserie? Three Top Chefs Do" [by Russ Parsons, Jan. 17]. I have wanted this for at least 15 years. After living in France for five years and moving back to L.A. in 1992, I never understood why a brasserie or bistro couldn't survive. Then when we were blessed with Bastide, ah finally! Then Joe Pytka ruined that dream! Since L.A. is really going to become a "neighborhood" town, where you eat, shop and do business and hopefully work [in the same neighborhood]
FOOD
October 25, 2006 | By Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
IT was bound to happen sooner or later; I suppose the only wonder is that it took so long. After dinner a couple of weeks ago, a friend asked me for a cup of coffee. And that's when I realized I had no earthly idea how to make one. I'm 51 years old and I've been cooking seriously for more than 25 years. I've written two cookbooks. I can make fresh pasta fine as a silk scarf and a consomme that sparkles like a mountain stream. Yet I didn't know how to make a really good cup of coffee.
MAGAZINE
April 15, 1990
Regarding "Taming the Wild Mushroom," by Russ Parsons (Food, Jan.14): I could not find a mycological society listed in the telephone directory, and I would appreciate its address and telephone number. My husband and I would like to explore the possibility of growing wild mushrooms. MICHELE MCCOY-BAIN Los Angeles For taped information about meetings of the Los Angeles Mycological Society, telephone (213) 292-1900, or write Los Angeles Mycological Society, Biology Department, California State University, Los Angeles, 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles 90032.
FOOD
January 24, 2007
WHAT a relief I felt after reading your article "Parlez-Vous Brasserie? Three Top Chefs Do" [by Russ Parsons, Jan. 17]. I have wanted this for at least 15 years. After living in France for five years and moving back to L.A. in 1992, I never understood why a brasserie or bistro couldn't survive. Then when we were blessed with Bastide, ah finally! Then Joe Pytka ruined that dream! Since L.A. is really going to become a "neighborhood" town, where you eat, shop and do business and hopefully work [in the same neighborhood]
FOOD
May 10, 2006
WHILE I believe that one should be sensible about all things, I don't think that absence of foie gras is going to affect gourmet dining ["Chicago Says No to Foie," by Russ Parsons, May 3]. It's tasty and all that, but the planet will continue spinning if I never get to eat it again. I totally disagree with the suggestion by some chefs that other edibles may be targeted next. If the overall result of this ban is for us to treat all living things with a little more respect, then it's the right thing to do. Let's enjoy our food, but let's not torture absolutely everything before we eat it!
FOOD
March 29, 2006
THANK you to Russ Parsons for the wonderful, playful tone you bring to food writing. I consistently find myself laughing and promptly e-mailing your pieces to my foodie friends and my language-loving, polyglot father. And, of course, cooking recipes from them later in the week. Joy in food is such a good thing, and sharing it through your writing is pure pleasure. CAMERON BLAKE HOLTZ Charlotte, N.C.
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