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Russell Ames

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WORLD
November 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Three Americans jailed over a land dispute in Mexico's southern Oaxaca state have been released and the charges thrown out, their attorney said. Mary Ellen Sanger, John Barbato and Joseph Simpson were charged with illegally occupying and looting a large house in the town of San Pablo Etla whose ownership by U.S. writer Russell Ames is contested by the local University of the Americas. Sanger, Barbato and Simpson had lived in the house to care for Ames.
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WORLD
November 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Three Americans jailed over a land dispute in Mexico's southern Oaxaca state have been released and the charges thrown out, their attorney said. Mary Ellen Sanger, John Barbato and Joseph Simpson were charged with illegally occupying and looting a large house in the town of San Pablo Etla whose ownership by U.S. writer Russell Ames is contested by the local University of the Americas. Sanger, Barbato and Simpson had lived in the house to care for Ames.
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OPINION
January 13, 2010 | By Thomas A. Parham
The furor over Sen. Harry Reid's remarks about President Obama's race, reported by The Times in several articles, has gone way overboard. His remarks, however -- that Obama is "light-skinned" and speaks with "no Negro dialect, unless he wanted to have one" -- may yet prove useful in sparking a badly needed, frank conversation about race in America. Indeed, we can never understand what Reid meant -- and our reaction -- unless we have this conversation. Though I accept Reid's apology and take the president at his word that this is a nonissue, we must be honest with ourselves about the context of what Reid said.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2000 | LEE DYE
Contrary to the popular view of science as a process that advances methodically from one point to the next toward a clearly defined goal, some of the best science comes about serendipitously. No one knows that better than scientists at the Energy Department's Ames Laboratory, who have discovered an ultra-hard material that could have a profound impact on the manufacturing of items ranging from microprocessors to industrial machinery.
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