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Russell Boyd

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2004
'Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World' Russell Boyd In one of the few technical categories without a nominee from "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King," the race for this year's cinematography award was considered one of the most wide open and difficult to predict. Russell Boyd won with his first nomination, for "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World."
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BOOKS
September 19, 2004 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of the forthcoming "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries of Margaret Millar."
Russell BOYD, a south Vermont state trooper with a heightened sense of life's potential for disaster, and Frank Kohler, a computer repairman with dreadful memories and a bleak-seeming future, are the apposite protagonists in Craig Nova's riveting, finely rendered, insight-provoking novel: Two somewhat similar yet crucially different cruisers along life's two-lane blacktop are unwittingly bound for a head-on collision. Or almost unwittingly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
Russell Boyd on Tuesday received his first nomination from the American Society of Cinematographers for best feature film cinematography of 2003, for his work on "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World." At the awards ceremony Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2004
'Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World' Russell Boyd In one of the few technical categories without a nominee from "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King," the race for this year's cinematography award was considered one of the most wide open and difficult to predict. Russell Boyd won with his first nomination, for "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World."
BOOKS
September 19, 2004 | Tom Nolan, Tom Nolan is the author of "Ross Macdonald: A Biography" and editor of the forthcoming "The Couple Next Door: Collected Short Mysteries of Margaret Millar."
Russell BOYD, a south Vermont state trooper with a heightened sense of life's potential for disaster, and Frank Kohler, a computer repairman with dreadful memories and a bleak-seeming future, are the apposite protagonists in Craig Nova's riveting, finely rendered, insight-provoking novel: Two somewhat similar yet crucially different cruisers along life's two-lane blacktop are unwittingly bound for a head-on collision. Or almost unwittingly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
Re "Growing Signs of Change," May 28: I moved to Yorba Linda in 1965. There was no high school in town so we were bused to Troy High in Fullerton. Today, 33 years later, Yorba Linda still does not have a high school. Now, after many years of growth on the east side, the City Council seems to be endorsing a new development of about 600 homes on the west side. Where will these new homeowners send their high school-age offspring? The developers are talking about a new elementary school, a park and a golf course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1999
Regarding the man who rammed his car into a Costa Mesa playground and killed two preschoolers on May 3: We ask ourselves how can something like this happen. It can't happen, it should not happen, but it did. There are no reasons to even begin to justify this malicious, murderous act against a group of innocent young preschoolers. Steven Allen Abrams decided to take his car, basically at this point a 3,000-pound missile, and accelerate it into a preschool with the intent of killing small children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2004
BEST PICTURE "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" * ACTOR Sean Penn "Mystic River" * ACTRESS Charlize Theron "Monster" * SUPPORTING ACTOR Tim Robbins "Mystic River" * SUPPORTING ACTRESS Renee Zellweger "Cold Mountain" * DIRECTOR Peter Jackson "The Return of the King" * ADAPTED SCREENPLAY Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson "The Return of the King" * ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Sofia Coppola "Lost in Translation" * FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM "The Barbarian Invasions" Canada * ANIMATED
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Paul Hogan, writer-star of "Crocodile Dundee" (which opens Friday at selected theaters), is a leathery-looking, boiled-to-the-bone kind of fellow. He has a crinkly smile, ice-blue eyes and seemingly infallible charm: macho , but unthreatening. He probably could hold a knife at your throat, and still not ruffle you. However sharp the knife, he could rattle off a dry, wry "G'day, chum!," and you'd be convinced it was all in fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
"The Rescue" (citywide) whisks us through an intricate, misfired secret undersea mission to get to the heart of the matter: Four members of a special naval task force have been captured by the North Koreans, and for political reasons, whatever waves our government is going to make in their behalf will be restricted to diplomatic channels. Before you can say "Iron Eagle," the captives' teen-age kids, living on a South Korean base, decide to take matters into their own hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
Russell Boyd on Tuesday received his first nomination from the American Society of Cinematographers for best feature film cinematography of 2003, for his work on "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World." At the awards ceremony Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Australian actor Bryan Brown has a heroic presence that has almost never been properly exploited in the movies. Playing Dian Fossey's lover in "Gorillas in the Mist," he fit right into that film's teeming junglescapes. But epics like TV's "The Thorn Birds" and "Tai-Pan" didn't do anything for him. Neither did a movie like "Cocktail," where he got to juggle beer bottles in the course of being upstaged by Tom Cruise--through force of stardom, not force of talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Almost an Angel" (citywide) might just as well be called " 'Crocodile' Dundee Gets Religion." As amiable as ever, lean and leathery Paul Hogan plays a career criminal and electronics wizard who, fresh out of prison, assumes a hilariously precise Willie Nelson impersonation and knocks over a bank. Before he can do a repeat performance, this time disguised as Rod Stewart, he instinctively rushes into oncoming traffic to shove a toddler to safety.
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