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Russell Crotty

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February 16, 2001 | HOLLY MYERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Russell Crotty is more than respectably accredited as an artist--he has an MFA, gallery representation, teaching credits and so on--the truly resonant quality of his work is its spirit of amateurism. The term "amateur" is often used today to imply second-rate status, but in its traditional sense, or perhaps in a more romantic sense, it means a person who engages in a chosen pursuit for pleasure rather than as a profession.
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MAGAZINE
September 28, 2003
"Hanging and display are very important parts of having a collection because you want to do justice to the piece of art," says MOCA trustee Dallas Price-Van Breda. "How a piece is hung and how it's placed are critical." It's a lesson Price-Van Breda has learned at her Westside canyon property. There her two private home galleries see an ebb and flow as the art she purchases arrives and then occasionally departs when she is asked to loan pieces for various exhibitions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2001 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Russell Crotty ponders the universe. Literally. Night after night, he peers through the telescope in his backyard observatory in Malibu, noting detailed observations of the moon and planets. These later are translated into drawings, books and Lucite globes. His work can be seen in "Russell Crotty: The Universe From My Backyard," an exhibition on view through April 22 at the Williamson Gallery at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2001 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Russell Crotty ponders the universe. Literally. Night after night, he peers through the telescope in his backyard observatory in Malibu, noting detailed observations of the moon and planets. These later are translated into drawings, books and Lucite globes. His work can be seen in "Russell Crotty: The Universe From My Backyard," an exhibition on view through April 22 at the Williamson Gallery at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena.
MAGAZINE
September 28, 2003
"Hanging and display are very important parts of having a collection because you want to do justice to the piece of art," says MOCA trustee Dallas Price-Van Breda. "How a piece is hung and how it's placed are critical." It's a lesson Price-Van Breda has learned at her Westside canyon property. There her two private home galleries see an ebb and flow as the art she purchases arrives and then occasionally departs when she is asked to loan pieces for various exhibitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | DAVID PAGEL
More than 40,000 tiny surfers shoot across the surfaces of Russell Crotty's drawings. Arranged in grids whose sections often measure a square inch or less, these miniature figures initially register the artist's patience and obsessiveness. They evoke a trance-like state of Zen emptiness in which the seemingly endless repetition of a simple task transcends ordinary mindlessness and opens onto the mesmerizing absorption in one's surroundings.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SOMEWHERE between a dorm-room poster of Monet's waterlilies and the Robert Rauschenberg painting owned by Eli Broad is another level -- the beginnings of an art collection that can be built by anyone with a few grand to spend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
For years it's seemed that Kyoko Asano's expertly realistic paintings of beaches and washed up detritus were intended as symbols, but her masterful technique often preempted her message. As if to not be misunderstood, new work makes a fairly literal affair of themes like collective consciousness, relativity of time, life and death. A half dozen large, multipaneled paintings follow the same format.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
AS tourists and art aficionados in Paris take their first look at "Los Angeles 1955-1985," a sprawling historical survey opening this week at the Pompidou Center, their counterparts in New York will get a juicy sampling of what L.A.'s contemporary art galleries have to offer. Sixteen local gallery owners have joined forces to create LA Art, a commercial art fair debuting Friday through next Sunday at the Altman Building in Manhattan's Chelsea district.
BOOKS
December 4, 2005 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
WHY does disposable culture stick around? What makes us cling to materials we're meant to throw away? In "The World on Sunday: Graphic Art in Joseph Pulitzer's Newspaper (1898-1911)" (Bulfinch: 132 pp., $50), Nicholson Baker and his wife, Margaret Brentano, suggest that it's partly a matter of time -- that the "low and pandering art" of one generation is documentary evidence to the next.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | HOLLY MYERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Russell Crotty is more than respectably accredited as an artist--he has an MFA, gallery representation, teaching credits and so on--the truly resonant quality of his work is its spirit of amateurism. The term "amateur" is often used today to imply second-rate status, but in its traditional sense, or perhaps in a more romantic sense, it means a person who engages in a chosen pursuit for pleasure rather than as a profession.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | DAVID PAGEL
More than 40,000 tiny surfers shoot across the surfaces of Russell Crotty's drawings. Arranged in grids whose sections often measure a square inch or less, these miniature figures initially register the artist's patience and obsessiveness. They evoke a trance-like state of Zen emptiness in which the seemingly endless repetition of a simple task transcends ordinary mindlessness and opens onto the mesmerizing absorption in one's surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
San Francisco's Capp Street Project is celebrating its 10th anniversary with a forward-looking benefit exhibition and sale. Executive Director Linda Blumberg has invited 80 artists, architects and designers to redesign the American flag for "Old Glory, New Story: Flagging the 21st Century," on view through Feb. 4. The coming of a new millennium seemed a good time to examine a hallowed symbol of the country and to think about possible models for the future, Blumberg says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a coup likely to boost its national profile, the Laguna Art Museum has received 109 contemporary works by prominent and emerging California artists from Judith and Stuart Spence, Sunland residents considered among the world's top art collectors. "This gives us a real leg up and a good start toward a stupendous holding of contemporary art from Southern California," museum Director Bolton Colburn said Wednesday.
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