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Russell E Train

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BUSINESS
July 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARRISH, Times Staff Writer
Conservationist camels are sticking their noses into oil company tents. Two months ago, after the Alaska oil spill, Exxon agreed to add an environmentalist to its board. Then last week, California State Controller Gray Davis and New York City Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin, as trustees of powerful retirement system investors, urged six other major oil companies to follow suit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARRISH, Times Staff Writer
Conservationist camels are sticking their noses into oil company tents. Two months ago, after the Alaska oil spill, Exxon agreed to add an environmentalist to its board. Then last week, California State Controller Gray Davis and New York City Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin, as trustees of powerful retirement system investors, urged six other major oil companies to follow suit.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 1986 | BILL RITTER, Times Staff Writer
Union Carbide's pending $2.2-billion sale of its Eveready, Prestone, Glad and other consumer products businesses is undervalued and should be called off, company shareholders alleged in a class-action lawsuit filed Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court. Union Carbide undermined the sale price by improperly attaching long-term supply and executive employment contracts to the purchase agreements, the lawsuit charged.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER and KELLY OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, in another attempt to put distance between Administration policy and the Republican legislative agenda, on Tuesday portrayed a GOP proposal to freeze federal regulations as "extreme" and implied that he will veto the proposal if it reaches his desk. Defending federal rules that he said save lives and protect the environment, Clinton said that the Republican regulatory reform plan would jeopardize the public to shield narrow special interests from government oversight.
NEWS
October 3, 1985 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Two of the nation's leading conservation organizations Tuesday put into effect a major restructuring of top management under interlocking boards as a first step toward consolidating their policies and projects. The affiliation of the World Wildlife Fund-U.S. and the Conservation Foundation stopped short of a full merger, but the practical effect was described as the same. Together, the organizations have an annual budget of $16 million. Russell E.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
Exxon Corp. elected a well-regarded marine scientist to its board Wednesday--fulfilling a promise that it would add a director with an environmental background--but the appointment drew mixed reviews from environmental groups who had favored a stronger advocate. John H. Steele, 62, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts and president of its governing body, was elected to a one-year stint on Exxon's board, bringing its total membership to 15.
NEWS
December 12, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two years' work, a blue-ribbon panel of business, government and science leaders said Friday that the United States must reject the "false dichotomy" of jobs versus environmental protection and adopt sweeping policy changes to link the pursuits of economic and environmental health.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2004 | Tom Hamburger and Alan C. Miller, Times Staff Writers
Political appointees in the Environmental Protection Agency bypassed agency professional staff and a federal advisory panel last year to craft a rule on mercury emissions preferred by the industry and the White House, several longtime EPA officials say. The EPA staffers say they were told not to undertake the normal scientific and economic studies called for under a standing executive order.
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | From Associated Press
The tradition of giving gifts at Christmas began nearly 2,000 years ago when the Christ child received the gifts of the Magi. Among those gifts, according to legend, was a rude reed pipe made by a shepherd. Today, musical presents are available for every age group, experience level and budget, says the American Music Conference, which estimates more than 57 million Americans are playing some kind of instrument.
OPINION
March 11, 1990 | Gregg Easterbrook, Gregg Easterbrook is a contributing editor to Newsweek
The Washington pundit class loves tales of personality conflicts at senior levels. Speculating about who's knifing whom is more fun than addressing that annoyance, the issues. In this spirit, the recent, heavily hyped "clash" between White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator William K. Reilly has been, to columnists and the shout-show circuit, just what the doctor ordered.
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