Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussell Ferguson
IN THE NEWS

Russell Ferguson

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
What does it look like on the other side of death's curtain? While most imagine ferrymen or cherubs, drifting clouds or reeking smoke, Russell Ferguson sees a revolver firing very slowly, a once-glamorous Czech hotel lobby that looks as if it was rendered with nail polish, or preppy painter Fairfield Porter standing quietly in a sunlit room. They're some of the paintings he has assembled for a show about the death of painting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
There's likely an audience for the cloying and dizzying hip-hop dance flick"Battlefield America,"but even the most forgiving viewers may feel like they've been underestimated - and underserved. Writer-producer-director Christopher B. Stokes ("You Got Served") sledgehammers his way through his unconvincing, on-the-nose script involving Sean Lewis (actor-musician and "Served" alumnus Marques Houston), a slick, child-loathing, L.A. marketing executive arrested for a DUI and forced into community service - in Long Beach - as a kids' dance coach.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
There's likely an audience for the cloying and dizzying hip-hop dance flick"Battlefield America,"but even the most forgiving viewers may feel like they've been underestimated - and underserved. Writer-producer-director Christopher B. Stokes ("You Got Served") sledgehammers his way through his unconvincing, on-the-nose script involving Sean Lewis (actor-musician and "Served" alumnus Marques Houston), a slick, child-loathing, L.A. marketing executive arrested for a DUI and forced into community service - in Long Beach - as a kids' dance coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
What does it look like on the other side of death's curtain? While most imagine ferrymen or cherubs, drifting clouds or reeking smoke, Russell Ferguson sees a revolver firing very slowly, a once-glamorous Czech hotel lobby that looks as if it was rendered with nail polish, or preppy painter Fairfield Porter standing quietly in a sunlit room. They're some of the paintings he has assembled for a show about the death of painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By David Ng
Karin Higa, a specialist in Asian American art who worked for nearly a decade and a half as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, has died at 47. Higa died on Tuesday at her home in L.A. following a battle with cancer, said Russell Ferguson, her husband. Ferguson, who is a professor in the art department at UCLA, said that his wife had been diagnosed with cancer in February. Higa worked as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum from 1992 to 2006, rising to the rank of senior curator of art. She had recently been named a curator for the Hammer Museum's "Made in L.A. " Biennial for 2014 but was forced to step down due to her illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Russell Ferguson, deputy director of exhibitions and programs and chief curator at the UCLA Hammer Museum, has agreed to become chairman of the university's art department. The appointment, which requires approval by the university and chancellor, is likely to be confirmed near the beginning of 2007, allowing Ferguson to assume the new role in the spring term. He will retain the title adjunct curator at the Hammer.
SPORTS
May 26, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON
Last year's bench coach, Joe Ferguson, was replaced this season by Bill Russell. But Ferguson, who is in his eighth year as a Dodger coach, is still working with the catchers in practice and is now positioning Dodger fielders from the press box during games. There is nothing scientific, though, about the way Ferguson relays information to the bench. "Billy looks up at me in the press box and I give him the signs," Ferguson said. "Then he relays them to the fielders."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
The UCLA Hammer Museum has received an estimated $1-million gift of more than 80 contemporary artworks, significantly expanding its collection of photography and other works on paper. The donation of drawings, prints, videos and mixed-media works, as well as photographs, is from Santa Monica gallery owner Patrick Painter and his wife, Soo Jin Jeong-Painter. It includes large groups of works by Roy Arden, Ed Ruscha and Christopher Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013
Karin Higa Expert in Asian American art Karin Higa, 47, a specialist in Asian American art who worked for nearly a decade and a half as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, died Tuesday at her home in L.A., said Russell Ferguson, her husband. Ferguson, a professor in the art department at UCLA, said his wife had been diagnosed with cancer in February. Higa worked as a curator at the Japanese American National Museum from 1992 to 2006, rising to the rank of senior curator of art. She had recently been named a curator for the Hammer Museum's "Made in L.A. " Biennial for 2014 but was forced to step down because of her illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2001 | SHAUNA SNOW
VISUAL ART Ransom Demand: Armed robbers who stole a Rembrandt and two Renoirs from the Swedish National Museum a few days before Christmas have written the museum demanding an undisclosed ransom for the pictures, valued at nearly $30 million. Photographs of the paintings--a small Rembrandt self-portrait from 1630 and Renoir's late-19th century "Young Parisian" and "Conversation"--accompanied the letter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2006 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
A sleek gallery with pale blue walls and ribbed rubber flooring seems an appropriately modern setting for the artwork of "The Societe Anonyme: Modernism for America" at the UCLA Hammer Museum. But what's with the paper lace framing some of the paintings? This gallery, it turns out, replicates the landmark 1920 inaugural exhibition put on by the Societe Anonyme in two rooms of a New York town house.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|