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Russell Frackman

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BUSINESS
March 2, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Napster Inc., the controversial song-swapping service, heads back to U.S. District Court in San Francisco today to face the music for what could be the last time. Judge Marilyn Hall Patel has been instructed by a federal appeals court to order Napster to stop users from trading copyright-protected music files from its system, a move that could shutter the service. Pressing the case for the record industry at today's hearing is Russell Frackman, the chief litigator for the big labels.
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BUSINESS
March 2, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Napster Inc., the controversial song-swapping service, heads back to U.S. District Court in San Francisco today to face the music for what could be the last time. Judge Marilyn Hall Patel has been instructed by a federal appeals court to order Napster to stop users from trading copyright-protected music files from its system, a move that could shutter the service. Pressing the case for the record industry at today's hearing is Russell Frackman, the chief litigator for the big labels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. District Court copyright infringement lawsuit accusing Mazda Motor of America Inc. of using metal rocker Rob Zombie's music without permission has been settled, a lawyer said Tuesday. The amount of the settlement, which resolves a 2-year-old lawsuit filed by Seagram's UMG Recordings Inc., was not disclosed, said Russell Frackman, a lawyer for the firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991
A Los Angeles federal judge on Thursday refused to dismiss federal fraud and racketeering claims against the lip-synching pop duo Milli Vanilli and associates, an action that would have left it to a state lawsuit to carry forward fraud claims against the pair, their producer and record label. Judge J.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in San Francisco raised doubts Thursday about the legality of software made by 321 Studios that lets consumers copy movies on DVDs, suggesting that she may soon ban the products. One sticking point for U.S. District Judge Susan Illston, however, was the possibility that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, the law 321 Studios is accused of violating, is unconstitutional because it lets Hollywood studios control the use of their movies long after their copyrights expire.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first major upgrade, the Kazaa online file-sharing network is taking steps to blunt some of the tactics that record companies and Hollywood studios have used to deter Kazaa users from copying songs and movies. Sharman Networks, a privately held firm based on the South Pacific island of Vanuatu that develops the Kazaa software, is expected to begin distributing a new version of the program today. The changes include a new set of protections against bogus or corrupted files and viruses.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2004 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
A Beverly Hills pornography publisher sued Google Inc. for copyright infringement Friday, accusing the Internet titan of failing to adequately remove from its search results thousands of photos posted online without permission. In a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, Perfect 10 Inc. alleged that Web surfers could find its copyrighted pictures of nude women for free by performing Google searches. The company said it had sent 27 formal requests to Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel on Tuesday gave Napster Inc. nearly 10 months to prove its claim that the major record companies have misused copyrights and impeded competition. Patel gave Redwood City, Calif.-based Napster access to more of the labels' documents and executives than the record companies had proposed, and much more time to prepare its case. The labels sought to wrap up the inquiry within a few months, but Patel's schedule lets Napster gather evidence until January.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge gave the beleaguered Napster Inc. online song-swapping service an unexpected ray of hope Wednesday when she questioned whether the record industry's plans for authorized digital music licensing could amount to misuse of their own copyrights. U.S. District Judge Marilyn Patel's comments came during a hearing on the record labels' request for summary judgment in their 2-year-old suit, which accuses Napster of helping millions of its users violate their copyrights.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals panel Monday gave record and film companies another piece of ammunition in their fight against online piracy, upholding a lower court order that shut down Napster Inc.'s free song-sharing service. The ruling has little impact on Redwood City-based Napster, which has abandoned its free service in favor of one that pays labels and songwriters for each song copied. But lawyers for the music industry say it could rein in other online systems, including Morpheus, Kazaa and Grokster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | David Colker
Don Engel had only a small law firm in Los Angeles - just two or three attorneys in addition to him and his wife. But a phone call from Engel could strike fear among the loftiest executives in the music business. Engel, who represented some of the biggest pop stars of the 1970s, '80s and '90s, was a fierce, tireless and some say overbearing fighter on behalf of clients who wanted to revise or cancel their recording contracts. Among his clients were hit makers Olivia Newton-John, Donna Summer, Don Henley and the band Boston.
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