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Russell Gewirtz

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2006 | Susan King
Seven years ago, Russell Gewirtz and his father profited handsomely from the sale of one of the family's clothing stores in New York City. "We made a lot of money from the property," said Gewirtz, a former attorney. "So when I was 33, I found myself with a nice nest egg and no real career in front of me." For the next few years, he lived a life of champagne wishes and caviar dreams as he traveled between Cannes, Brazil and Miami Beach: "I basically didn't have to wear socks for three years."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Eddie Murphy had a simple suggestion about six years ago: Why not make an all-black version of "Ocean's Eleven"? Director Brett Ratner and producer Brian Grazer loved the comedian's idea, and before long, the trio was throwing around ideas about who could star opposite Murphy: Jamie Foxx, Dave Chappelle, Chris Rock, Tracy Morgan and Chris Tucker headed the list. The resulting movie, Universal Pictures' "Tower Heist," arrives in theaters this weekend, where it will face solid competition from Warner Bros.' "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
When Emmett/Furla Films co-chairman and producer Randall Emmett announced from Cannes two weeks ago that he was financing the $60-million thriller "Righteous Kill," he implied that the idea for the film had been sparked by the desire of friends Al Pacino and Robert De Niro to work together again. This was news to the script's writer, Russell Gewirtz, who started writing "Righteous Kill" four years ago, before his first attempt at a screenplay, "Inside Man," had even sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2007 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
When Emmett/Furla Films co-chairman and producer Randall Emmett announced from Cannes two weeks ago that he was financing the $60-million thriller "Righteous Kill," he implied that the idea for the film had been sparked by the desire of friends Al Pacino and Robert De Niro to work together again. This was news to the script's writer, Russell Gewirtz, who started writing "Righteous Kill" four years ago, before his first attempt at a screenplay, "Inside Man," had even sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2011 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Eddie Murphy had a simple suggestion about six years ago: Why not make an all-black version of "Ocean's Eleven"? Director Brett Ratner and producer Brian Grazer loved the comedian's idea, and before long, the trio was throwing around ideas about who could star opposite Murphy: Jamie Foxx, Dave Chappelle, Chris Rock, Tracy Morgan and Chris Tucker headed the list. The resulting movie, Universal Pictures' "Tower Heist," arrives in theaters this weekend, where it will face solid competition from Warner Bros.' "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
What's going down inside Manhattan Trust's Wall Street branch may or may not be the usual bank robbery, but "Inside Man," the crime drama that details those nefarious doings, is careful to keep its distance from your standard heist movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2008 | Gene Seymour, Special to The Times
It seems an imposition on somebody's part to ask Robert De Niro and Al Pacino to use their iconic power to prop up and inflate "Righteous Kill," a tricked-up and often turgid police thriller. At least these two aging virtuosi of the Method don't altogether submit to the temptation of mailing in their performances. And they seem comfortable enough in each other's company on-screen to make you wish there were more scenes that allowed them to just kick back and riff. It'd be a lot more enjoyable than watching the movie strain for clarity -- or cleverness.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2009
Pineapple Express Sony, $28.96/$34.95; Blu-ray, $39.95 The Judd Apatow comedy factory cranks out another wildly uneven but mostly enjoyable comedy with this shaggy-dog story about two potheads (played by the hilarious James Franco and the movie's co-writer, Seth Rogen) who inadvertently cross a local gangster and end up running for their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2006 | R. Kinsey Lowe, Times Staff Writer
Reflecting on the surprising strength of his new movie directed by Spike Lee, producer Brian Grazer said Sunday morning, "I've had some unique professional victories, and this is one of the top." "This" was the far-better-than-expected $29-million estimated opening for "Inside Man" -- the year's second-strongest movie debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2006 | Stephen Hunter, Washington Post
Louis B. Mayer used to brag that MGM, the studio he led through its golden age, boasted "more stars than there are in heaven." In those days, that was something: Stars counted. Garbo, Gable, Garland, just to cover the Gs. Today, it's said, the only thing a star is good for is to get you a table in a crowded restaurant. And it's true, stars can't really open films the way they used to; people respond more to Internet buzz, TV ads, movie crit -- er, no, Roger Ebert.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2006 | Susan King
Seven years ago, Russell Gewirtz and his father profited handsomely from the sale of one of the family's clothing stores in New York City. "We made a lot of money from the property," said Gewirtz, a former attorney. "So when I was 33, I found myself with a nice nest egg and no real career in front of me." For the next few years, he lived a life of champagne wishes and caviar dreams as he traveled between Cannes, Brazil and Miami Beach: "I basically didn't have to wear socks for three years."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2008 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Robert De Niro and Al Pacino -- the names alone conjure a certain kind of streetwise intensity, an acting style of emotional soul-bearing right out of film's '70s heyday. Both rather famously appeared, if separately, in "The Godfather Part II," and it wasn't until the 1995 film "Heat" that they finally arrived on screen together, albeit briefly. In "Righteous Kill," opening this fall, Pacino and De Niro at long last share the screen for a significant amount of a movie's running time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
You've heard of Southern Gothic? Well, how does "William Faulkner's Nosferatu" grab ya? As the exclusive representative of the William Faulkner Literary Estate, producer Lee Caplin ("Ali") has had access to the vaunted Mississippi writer's letters, sketches, notes and other literary works for years. So when Jill Faulkner Summers, the novelist's daughter, found a manuscript seven years ago in the piles of material her father left behind when he died in 1962, she passed it on to Caplin.
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