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Russell Jacoby

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NEWS
June 20, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's going to be interesting, a few decades from now, to see what's become of the cultural controversies roiling college campuses in recent years. Multiculturalism, race and gender studies, deconstruction, relativism and contingency, sexual censorship, political correctness; most of these debate topics will fade away, but at the moment it's impossible to say which. All are plausible, and to pervert P.G.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 29, 2005
Re "Turning academia into a cafeteria," Opinion, Nov. 23 Russell Jacoby was right to warn of the damage to public universities from so-called choice in the curriculum. At Cal Poly, where I have taught for 38 years, the history department recently decided to expel the only course in Greek and Roman history in the curriculum. At the same time, it added two new courses: "Versions of the Past: Novels, Comics and Movies" and "The Historical Novel in the United States, 1960s to the Present."
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OPINION
November 29, 2005
Re "Turning academia into a cafeteria," Opinion, Nov. 23 Russell Jacoby was right to warn of the damage to public universities from so-called choice in the curriculum. At Cal Poly, where I have taught for 38 years, the history department recently decided to expel the only course in Greek and Roman history in the curriculum. At the same time, it added two new courses: "Versions of the Past: Novels, Comics and Movies" and "The Historical Novel in the United States, 1960s to the Present."
BOOKS
May 23, 1999 | JOHN GRAY, John Gray is professor of European thought at the London School of Economics and the author of, most recently, "False Dawn: The Delusions of Global Capitalism" (The New Press)
Not so long ago, the most we had to fear--so we were told--was boredom. In that far-off era, the quietly apocalyptic fall of the Berlin Wall had shown the future lay with "democratic capitalism." With the worldwide triumph of democracy and free markets would come the only evil we should fear--the boredom that follows the end of history. To be sure, from the start there were many who warned against this farrago of sub-Marxian historical determinism and right-wing hubris.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989
Russell Jacoby skipped a bit breezily over some weighty arguments in the nuclear books he reviewed (Book Review, July 2), and in the process he contradicted himself. If Jeff Smith's "Unthinking the Unthinkable" critiques Jonathan Schell, for instance--and Jacoby never says the critique is wrong--how could it be taking on "straw men"? Schell has had massive influence in anti-nuclear circles, and an anti-nuclear book that points out his naivete would seem to be boldly risking the loss of its principal audience.
BOOKS
April 2, 1989
I have just read with disgust your paper's review by Russell Jacoby of Paul Johnson's latest book, "Intellectuals" (Book Review, March 19). It is bad enough that you chose a literary competitor of Johnson to review his book, Jacoby having also written on this topic, but to select a reviewer who could do little more than savage a respected historian is despicable. Jacoby neither reviews the book's content, nor effectively refutes either Johnson's premise or his supporting data. Rather, your collegiate reviewer seems content to demonstrate an intellectual phenomena which probably encouraged the creation of "Intellectuals" in the first place: Hysterical intolerance for any thought that is not ideologically collectivist in content, sympathy or tone.
BOOKS
July 16, 1989
I was appalled at the innuendo and falsity in Russell Jacoby's characterization of Jung and Jungians in the course of his review of Jerome Bernstein's "Power and Politics" (Book Review, July 2). First, Jung read the Zurich newspaper every day, and had frequent and lengthy commentaries about the state of political realities throughout his writings. Second, the old canard linking Jung to Nazi sympathies was cleverly put forth in Jacoby's review, but just as mistaken and offensive. Jung did not believe that the "Jewish psyche" was inferior.
BOOKS
October 4, 1987 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Perhaps in this neglected spot is laid Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire; Hands that the rod of empire might have swayed, Or waked to ecstasy the living lyre. But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page Rich with the spoils of time did ne'er unroll; Chill Penury repressed their noble rage, And froze the genial currents of the soul. Among those whom Thomas Gray mourned in his "Elegy in a Country Churchyard," one group was those whom we now would call free-lance writers.
BOOKS
May 23, 1999 | JOHN GRAY, John Gray is professor of European thought at the London School of Economics and the author of, most recently, "False Dawn: The Delusions of Global Capitalism" (The New Press)
Not so long ago, the most we had to fear--so we were told--was boredom. In that far-off era, the quietly apocalyptic fall of the Berlin Wall had shown the future lay with "democratic capitalism." With the worldwide triumph of democracy and free markets would come the only evil we should fear--the boredom that follows the end of history. To be sure, from the start there were many who warned against this farrago of sub-Marxian historical determinism and right-wing hubris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988
Russell Jacoby (Op-Ed Page, April 23) condemns "kiss and tell memoirs." He decries the debased level of political discourse. What he is really saying is that in the name of taste, we should limit freedom of the press. It is nonsense to call insider memoirs "gossip." If Larry Speakes is telling the truth about making up quotes, his statement is not gossip at all. It's the truth. Jacoby writes that such books are "completely irrelevant, since they illuminate no issues or problems."
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's going to be interesting, a few decades from now, to see what's become of the cultural controversies roiling college campuses in recent years. Multiculturalism, race and gender studies, deconstruction, relativism and contingency, sexual censorship, political correctness; most of these debate topics will fade away, but at the moment it's impossible to say which. All are plausible, and to pervert P.G.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989
Russell Jacoby skipped a bit breezily over some weighty arguments in the nuclear books he reviewed (Book Review, July 2), and in the process he contradicted himself. If Jeff Smith's "Unthinking the Unthinkable" critiques Jonathan Schell, for instance--and Jacoby never says the critique is wrong--how could it be taking on "straw men"? Schell has had massive influence in anti-nuclear circles, and an anti-nuclear book that points out his naivete would seem to be boldly risking the loss of its principal audience.
BOOKS
July 16, 1989
I was appalled at the innuendo and falsity in Russell Jacoby's characterization of Jung and Jungians in the course of his review of Jerome Bernstein's "Power and Politics" (Book Review, July 2). First, Jung read the Zurich newspaper every day, and had frequent and lengthy commentaries about the state of political realities throughout his writings. Second, the old canard linking Jung to Nazi sympathies was cleverly put forth in Jacoby's review, but just as mistaken and offensive. Jung did not believe that the "Jewish psyche" was inferior.
BOOKS
April 2, 1989
I have just read with disgust your paper's review by Russell Jacoby of Paul Johnson's latest book, "Intellectuals" (Book Review, March 19). It is bad enough that you chose a literary competitor of Johnson to review his book, Jacoby having also written on this topic, but to select a reviewer who could do little more than savage a respected historian is despicable. Jacoby neither reviews the book's content, nor effectively refutes either Johnson's premise or his supporting data. Rather, your collegiate reviewer seems content to demonstrate an intellectual phenomena which probably encouraged the creation of "Intellectuals" in the first place: Hysterical intolerance for any thought that is not ideologically collectivist in content, sympathy or tone.
BOOKS
October 4, 1987 | JACK MILES, Times Book Editor
Perhaps in this neglected spot is laid Some heart once pregnant with celestial fire; Hands that the rod of empire might have swayed, Or waked to ecstasy the living lyre. But Knowledge to their eyes her ample page Rich with the spoils of time did ne'er unroll; Chill Penury repressed their noble rage, And froze the genial currents of the soul. Among those whom Thomas Gray mourned in his "Elegy in a Country Churchyard," one group was those whom we now would call free-lance writers.
OPINION
June 26, 1988
Regarding Russell Jacoby's "The Writer as Worker" (Op-Ed Page, June 17): Those of us who write full time, without the support of a government grant, a regular paycheck or a working spouse, have of necessity learned that "writer's block" and "devotion to art" are luxuries we can rarely afford. The bank that holds the mortgage on my house is not the least interested in art. All they want is their money, on time, every time. With very few exceptions, American publishers today are units in corporate conglomerates devoted only to maximizing the return on their investment.
BOOKS
November 22, 1987
Paul Johnson's review of Gertrude Himmelfarb's "The Old History and the New" (The Book Review, Sept. 27) is a compendium of neoconservative cliches. In a tone of high-minded objectivity, Johnson endorses Himmelfarb's accusation that leftist scholars do not write "traditional history at all" but "covert left-wing propaganda," while he ignores the major leftist premise that the writing and teaching of traditional history (as well as other subject areas) has embodied covert right-wing propaganda.
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