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Russell Johnson

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Russell Johnson, the actor best known for playing the Professor on the sitcom hit "Gilligan's Island," died Thursday at age 89. The main joke about the Professor, one of the seven castaways stuck on the tropical island somewhere in the Pacific, was that he had the genius to create anything from two coconuts and bamboo, but he couldn't fix a hole in a boat. But setting aside the inability for some to just accept the show's basic premise, let's look at what magnificent inventions the Professor was able to create during the show's three seasons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Russell Johnson's fateful trip started with a three-hour tour in 1964 and lasted the rest of his life. A handsome war veteran who grew up in a Philadelphia orphanage, Johnson spent 14 years playing bad guys in TV and movie westerns. Then he reluctantly agreed to audition for a new comedy series called "Gilligan's Island," a program that would move critics like UPI's Rick DuBrow to declare: "It is impossible that a more inept, moronic or humorless show has ever appeared on the home tube.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Russell Johnson, whose inventive approach to the acoustic design of major performance venues allowed halls around the world to adjust to the requirements of a symphony or a jazz ensemble, has died. He was 83. The founder of Artec Consultants, Johnson was found dead in his New York City apartment Tuesday after he failed to show up at his office. He died in his sleep, said Tateo Nakajima, one of Artec's managing directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Russell Johnson, the actor best known for playing the Professor on the sitcom hit "Gilligan's Island," died Thursday at age 89. The main joke about the Professor, one of the seven castaways stuck on the tropical island somewhere in the Pacific, was that he had the genius to create anything from two coconuts and bamboo, but he couldn't fix a hole in a boat. But setting aside the inability for some to just accept the show's basic premise, let's look at what magnificent inventions the Professor was able to create during the show's three seasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Russell Johnson's fateful trip started with a three-hour tour in 1964 and lasted the rest of his life. A handsome war veteran who grew up in a Philadelphia orphanage, Johnson spent 14 years playing bad guys in TV and movie westerns. Then he reluctantly agreed to audition for a new comedy series called "Gilligan's Island," a program that would move critics like UPI's Rick DuBrow to declare: "It is impossible that a more inept, moronic or humorless show has ever appeared on the home tube.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By David Colker
Actor Russell Johnson, 89, who played the brainy Professor in nearly 100 episodes of the 1960s classic TV comedy series "Gilligan's Island," died Thursday morning at his home in Washington state. He died peacefully in his sleep of natural causes, said his agent, Michael Eisenstadt. Johnson also appeared in several films, including the sci-fi movies "It Came from Outer Space" and "This Island Earth," and he did guest appearances on numerous other series. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 But he is best known for his role on "Gilligan's Island" in which he played a professor who used his scientific knowledge to deal with the various perils the hapless castaways faced.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
NEAR the end of 2001, one of the nation's most eagerly awaited concert venues opened in Philadelphia. Much of the excitement about the $235-million Verizon Hall, part of the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, was driven by a pair of tag-team stars: the elegant Uruguayan-born architect Rafael Vinoly and the American acoustician who is probably the world's most famous, Russell Johnson. But the opening, by many accounts, was a disaster.
HOME & GARDEN
November 13, 2003 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
Termites by the thousands were chewing through the frame of architect Russell K. Johnson's Santa Monica condominium. Even a hefty dose of pesticide couldn't kill the destructive insects. "They just kept eating away," he said. Frustrated, he decided to do what many might consider impossible: build a stylish, modern home immune to the damaging effects of pests and the elements, a place tough enough to withstand fires and earthquakes.
OPINION
January 19, 2014
Re “Russell Johnson, 1924-2014: The professor, voice of knowledge on 'Gilligan,'” Obituary, Jan. 17 Russell Johnson, also known as the professor on TV's “Gilligan's Island,” sadly has passed away. And even though the show has been over for decades, each time one of the original stranded seven passes on to that little island in the sky, it brings back such memories. Bill Spitalnick Newport Beach More letters to the editor ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001
So, Ruth Galanter is bitterly disappointed by her colleagues and thinks "the double-cross is alive and well" ("Alex Padilla, 28, Defeats Galanter to Become President of City Council," July 4). That's nothing compared to how she sold her constituents and neighbors down the river by ramrodding a thumbs-up vote on Playa Vista through the lame-duck City Council last month. Russell Johnson Marina del Rey
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By David Colker
Actor Russell Johnson, 89, who played the brainy Professor in nearly 100 episodes of the 1960s classic TV comedy series "Gilligan's Island," died Thursday morning at his home in Washington state. He died peacefully in his sleep of natural causes, said his agent, Michael Eisenstadt. Johnson also appeared in several films, including the sci-fi movies "It Came from Outer Space" and "This Island Earth," and he did guest appearances on numerous other series. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 But he is best known for his role on "Gilligan's Island" in which he played a professor who used his scientific knowledge to deal with the various perils the hapless castaways faced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Russell Johnson, whose inventive approach to the acoustic design of major performance venues allowed halls around the world to adjust to the requirements of a symphony or a jazz ensemble, has died. He was 83. The founder of Artec Consultants, Johnson was found dead in his New York City apartment Tuesday after he failed to show up at his office. He died in his sleep, said Tateo Nakajima, one of Artec's managing directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
NEAR the end of 2001, one of the nation's most eagerly awaited concert venues opened in Philadelphia. Much of the excitement about the $235-million Verizon Hall, part of the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, was driven by a pair of tag-team stars: the elegant Uruguayan-born architect Rafael Vinoly and the American acoustician who is probably the world's most famous, Russell Johnson. But the opening, by many accounts, was a disaster.
HOME & GARDEN
November 13, 2003 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
Termites by the thousands were chewing through the frame of architect Russell K. Johnson's Santa Monica condominium. Even a hefty dose of pesticide couldn't kill the destructive insects. "They just kept eating away," he said. Frustrated, he decided to do what many might consider impossible: build a stylish, modern home immune to the damaging effects of pests and the elements, a place tough enough to withstand fires and earthquakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2003
SELLERS of packs of "Iraq's 55 Most Wanted" playing cards are doing a brisk business on EBay ("Phase 2 of War: Shock and Kitsch," by Roy Rivenburg, April 19). But where are the boxes of "U.S. Invasion Plan 2003-2004" dominoes, in mint condition and original order: Iraq, Syria, Iran, N. Korea, France, Cuba, California ... ? Russell Johnson Marina del Rey
OPINION
May 18, 2005
U.S. troops suffered nine deaths and 40 injuries in Operation Matador ("Marines Wrap Up Assault in West Iraq," May 15). But the "Iraqi platoon that has been training at the Al Asad Marine base was on vacation during the week of the Marine assault and did not participate." Incredible! In most jobs, staff vacations are scheduled at the pleasure of the company. In crunch times, your leave might be revoked in order to get the job done. Unless your participation might jeopardize the success of the project.
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