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Russell Means

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Means, who gained international notoriety as one of the leaders of the 71-day armed occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota in 1973 and continued to be an outspoken champion of American Indian rights after launching a career as an actor in films and television in the 1990s, has died. He was 72. Means died Monday at his home in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Reservation, said Glenn Morris, his legal representative. Diagnosed with esophageal cancer in July 2011 and told that it had spread too far for surgery, Means refused to undergo heavy doses of radiation and chemotherapy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Means, who gained international notoriety as one of the leaders of the 71-day armed occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota in 1973 and continued to be an outspoken champion of American Indian rights after launching a career as an actor in films and television in the 1990s, has died. He was 72. Means died Monday at his home in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Reservation, said Glenn Morris, his legal representative. Diagnosed with esophageal cancer in July 2011 and told that it had spread too far for surgery, Means refused to undergo heavy doses of radiation and chemotherapy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
Russell Means, the fiery, controversial Indian activist, is planning to relive the violent Wounded Knee siege--this time on film, starring, he says, his former "The Last of the Mohicans" co-star Daniel Day-Lewis. The restaging of the violent 1973 71-day standoff on the Pine Ridge Sioux reservation in South Dakota is only one of the many film projects Means, 54, has in the fire. Among his other efforts: * A documentary about 20th-Century Indian women.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Sioux actor and activist Russell Means went on trial before the Navajo Supreme Court in a case that tests the legitimacy of the American Indian justice system. The court convened at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., to hear an assault case against Means, a longtime leader of the American Indian Movement. Means is accused of beating his father-in-law in 1997 in Arizona's Navajo Nation, but as an Oglala Sioux, he insists he cannot be prosecuted by another tribe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | SHAHRAM VICTORY, Shahram Victory is a New York-based free-lance writer.
Indian activist Russell Means has successfully created his own dramatic, larger-than-life character--one that at least temporarily had to be suppressed for him to star in Michael Mann's upcoming movie "The Last of the Mohicans." As a leader of the American Indian Movement, Means, an Oglala Lakota, has both led armed insurrection against the United States and run for President.
BOOKS
January 21, 1996 | Bruce Olds, Bruce Olds is the author of the novel, "Raising Holy Hell" (Henry Holt)
Russell Means, arguably this country's most notorious Indian rights activist and more recently a Hollywood screen actor--he was a capable Chingachgook in the film "The Last of the Mohicans" and the strong voice of Chief Powhatan in Disney's animated "Pocohantas"--despised "Dances With Wolves."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1995 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Russell Means has collected a number of heavy-duty credits--though not the sort usually associated with show business folk. While his acting colleagues were boning up on "The Method" and Stanislavsky, he and fellow American Indian Movement leader Dennis Banks led a 71-day armed siege at South Dakota's Wounded Knee Reservation. While other actors waited on tables, he was incarcerated for a year for obstructing justice in a 1974 Sioux Falls riot.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 1986 | BELLA STUMBO, Bella Stumbo is a Times staff writer.
History was written here in 1973, when Dennis Banks and Russell Means led the American Indian Move ment's armed seizure of Wounded Knee, this tiny hamlet in the heart of South Dakota's Pine Ridge Sioux reservation. Hundreds of federal agents descended, encircling at least as many militant Indians holed up in houses and a church. The standoff lasted 71 days.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | PHIL McCOMBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
It may be symbolic of our age that Russell Means, one of the biggest, baddest, meanest, angriest, most famous American Indian activists of the late 20th century--a man who with other warriors faced off federal agents at Wounded Knee, S.D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1993 | JENNIFER MEARS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty years ago he led a 71-day occupation at Wounded Knee, S.D., and federal agents hauled him away. He defaced a statue of Christopher Columbus, and the court said it was free speech. He was charged with murder and exonerated. He joined the Moonies once and he tried running for president twice. During the past quarter-century, the American Indian's most visible activist and crusader has been Russell Means. The takeover of Wounded Knee by 300 members of the American Indian Movement on Feb.
HEALTH
August 10, 1998 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No wonder a guard at Universal CityWalk smiled when I said I couldn't find Russell Means. I'd been wandering around a few minutes--so had the American Indian activist and actor, looking for me. The guard indicated with a nod to turn around. I did and saw a big man with long black braids and American Indian jewelry cut a swath through the crowd. Means is 6 feet, 1 inch and 204 pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1996 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since 1970, when he became the first national director of the American Indian Movement, Russell Means has cast a large shadow across the political landscape. His confrontations at Mt. Rushmore, Plymouth Rock and the 71-day armed takeover at Wounded Knee enraged many and earned him hero status among others. An Oglala/Lakota Indian (as was Custer's nemesis Crazy Horse), Means was raised on a reservation near the Black Hills. His childhood was a misery.
BOOKS
January 21, 1996 | Bruce Olds, Bruce Olds is the author of the novel, "Raising Holy Hell" (Henry Holt)
Russell Means, arguably this country's most notorious Indian rights activist and more recently a Hollywood screen actor--he was a capable Chingachgook in the film "The Last of the Mohicans" and the strong voice of Chief Powhatan in Disney's animated "Pocohantas"--despised "Dances With Wolves."
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | PHIL McCOMBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
It may be symbolic of our age that Russell Means, one of the biggest, baddest, meanest, angriest, most famous American Indian activists of the late 20th century--a man who with other warriors faced off federal agents at Wounded Knee, S.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1995 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Russell Means has collected a number of heavy-duty credits--though not the sort usually associated with show business folk. While his acting colleagues were boning up on "The Method" and Stanislavsky, he and fellow American Indian Movement leader Dennis Banks led a 71-day armed siege at South Dakota's Wounded Knee Reservation. While other actors waited on tables, he was incarcerated for a year for obstructing justice in a 1974 Sioux Falls riot.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
Russell Means, the fiery, controversial Indian activist, is planning to relive the violent Wounded Knee siege--this time on film, starring, he says, his former "The Last of the Mohicans" co-star Daniel Day-Lewis. The restaging of the violent 1973 71-day standoff on the Pine Ridge Sioux reservation in South Dakota is only one of the many film projects Means, 54, has in the fire. Among his other efforts: * A documentary about 20th-Century Indian women.
NEWS
February 16, 1987
Indian activist Russell Means is seeking the Libertarian Party nomination for President. Means, who joined the party only a week earlier, told its California state convention in Millbrae that "I hope to show all Americans that the 'failure of socialism,' which former Secretary of Interior James Watt once pointed to on Indian reservations, is a universal problem."
NEWS
September 6, 1987
Ron Paul, a one-time Republican congressman from Texas, defeated American Indian activist Russell Means on the first ballot to become the anti-government Libertarian Party's 1988 presidential candidate. Former Alaska state Rep. Andre Marrou won the vice presidential nomination on a noisy voice vote from the 400-member delegation in Seattle. Paul received 196 votes to 129 for Means.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1993 | JENNIFER MEARS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty years ago he led a 71-day occupation at Wounded Knee, S.D., and federal agents hauled him away. He defaced a statue of Christopher Columbus, and the court said it was free speech. He was charged with murder and exonerated. He joined the Moonies once and he tried running for president twice. During the past quarter-century, the American Indian's most visible activist and crusader has been Russell Means. The takeover of Wounded Knee by 300 members of the American Indian Movement on Feb.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | MICHAEL ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five hundred years after Columbus first set foot in the Americas, Joseph Cervetto Jr., portraying the Genoese navigator in San Francisco's Columbus Day celebration, will re-enact the landing on the city's waterfront. Like Columbus, Cervetto will be met upon his arrival today by American Indians.
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