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Russell R Diehl

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BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russell R. Diehl and his company, Diehl & Co., have been fined $25,000 each by a securities regulatory group and suspended from trading stocks and bonds for 30 days for failing to maintain adequate net capital and proper financial records. But it's unlikely that the fines will be paid or the suspensions served because the Newport Beach company resigned from the National Assn. of Securities Dealers and stopped acting as a broker 13 months ago--before the exchange took action against it.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russell R. Diehl and his company, Diehl & Co., have been fined $25,000 each by a securities regulatory group and suspended from trading stocks and bonds for 30 days for failing to maintain adequate net capital and proper financial records. But it's unlikely that the fines will be paid or the suspensions served because the Newport Beach company resigned from the National Assn. of Securities Dealers and stopped acting as a broker 13 months ago--before the exchange took action against it.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Sixteen months after acquiring a small Santa Cruz computer maker, General Automation of Anaheim said it has decided to sell the money-losing operation to a British firm for an undisclosed amount of cash, notes and securities. Integrated Micro Products, a Consett, England, computer company, has agreed to purchase Parallel Computer, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Automation.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1988 | ERIC SCHINE, Times Staff Writer
From a young age, Brian J. Callahan dreamed of becoming a stockbroker, according to those who know the former Prudential-Bache Securities broker. Callahan, 28, who was fired last week for his alleged role in the widening stock trading scandal centered around a Business Week column, achieved his dream early in life. But now his career has been shattered. "All he wanted to be was a broker," said one person familiar with Callahan's career.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert P. Hyatt, the low-profile La Palma inventor who enjoyed a flash of fame in July when he won a patent for inventing the microprocessor 20 years ago, proved that small innovators can still make a mark in a world ruled by high-technology giants. But for many of Orange County's small- and mid-size technology companies, 1990 was the story of the little engines that couldn't. The technology sector, once the darling of local analysts, proved it was not immune to a degenerating economy.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visiting his sick mother at a hospital four years ago, Robert Markus watched in disbelief as nurses wrestled the aching patient onto a cold, hard bedpan. "It was a god-awful thing to see," Markus said. "Bedpans are the only things left in a hospital that haven't changed since the 19th Century. I thought, 'There's got to be something better.' " So the 70-year-old retired restaurateur and a partner went to work in a garage and developed an electric-powered, inflatable bedpan.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | DEBORA VRANA and JAMES S. GRANELLI and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are the lenders of last resort, the doors a desperate small business knocks on when banks are rejecting, the IRS is threatening and friends and family say no. If payments aren't made, sometimes entire businesses, homes, cars and other personal assets of the company's owners are seized by the more hard-hearted bottom feeders of the corporate loan world.
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