Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussell Simmons Def Comedy Jam
IN THE NEWS

Russell Simmons Def Comedy Jam

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A torrent of rap music fills the packed theater and a sea of fists pump the air as emcee Martin Lawrence swaggers confidently on stage and yells, "Yo, whassup, black people, whassup?" * A sharply dressed comedian surveys the crowd and proclaims: "Fellas, give it up for the ladies in the house! Let the dogs loose!" followed by a sustained chorus of "woofs" deeper and more sustained than any ever heard on the Arsenio Hall show.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"ED-DIE! ED-DIE! ED-DIE!!" The yells and cheers greeted the slim, young African-American comic as he strutted on stage at the sold-out Wiltern Theatre. Several other comedians had preceded him that evening in a touring version of HBO's "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam," but it was clear from the loud standing ovation that the night belonged to "Ed-die."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"ED-DIE! ED-DIE! ED-DIE!!" The yells and cheers greeted the slim, young African-American comic as he strutted on stage at the sold-out Wiltern Theatre. Several other comedians had preceded him that evening in a touring version of HBO's "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam," but it was clear from the loud standing ovation that the night belonged to "Ed-die."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A torrent of rap music fills the packed theater and a sea of fists pump the air as emcee Martin Lawrence swaggers confidently on stage and yells, "Yo, whassup, black people, whassup?" * A sharply dressed comedian surveys the crowd and proclaims: "Fellas, give it up for the ladies in the house! Let the dogs loose!" followed by a sustained chorus of "woofs" deeper and more sustained than any ever heard on the Arsenio Hall show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1995 | JAMES E. FOWLER
LAUGHING IN THE HOOD Def Comedy Jam All-Stars make their way to the Universal Amphitheater this Wednesday night. With its in-your-face style, Russell Simmons' "Def Comedy Jam" on Home Box Office is one of the most popular comedy shows in the '90s. In rap lingo, def means excellent. Although all the comics are African American and much of the material is filled with references unfamiliar to mainstream audiences, HBO research reveals that two-thirds of the show's audience is not black.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000
ANYTIME Sundays: Workaholic Jay Leno continues appearing virtually every Sunday night at the Comedy and Magic Club in Hermosa Beach. Thursdays: Drew Carey, Ryan Stiles, Colin Mochrie, Wayne Brady and Greg Proops keep their improv act sharp and try routines that may turn up on their ABC-TV series, "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Thursdays at the Hollywood Improv. Fridays, beginning Sept.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | CHRIS RUBIN, Chris Rubin is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer
The new host of HBO's "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam" isn't out to remake the show, just move it forward. " 'Comedy Jam' won't change much," says Joe Torry. "It's just a continuation, hipper, a new flavor. And," Torry adds with a laugh, "better looking." "Def Comedy Jam" producer Russell Simmons caught Torry's act in a comedy club and promised him a spot based on the strength of that performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON
Coming in June, in the raunchy, X-rated tradition of "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam," is more ethnic humor with some real spice. The producers of HBO's "Loco Slam," the Latino version of the African American comedy show, are crossing their fingers that the show will be as big a boost for Latino comics as "Def Comedy Jam" has been for black comedians.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2001 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Astaging of George Balanchine's "The Nutcracker," featuring guest stars from the Paris Opera Ballet, the New York City Ballet, the Bolshoi Ballet and the National Ballet of Cuba; a Down Under bill of Midnight Oil, INXS and Men at Work; and a barbecue with Willie Nelson highlight the Universal Amphitheatre's 2001-02 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2003 | Reilly Capps, Washington Post
Ken Bright, a gym teacher in Little Rock, Ark., had a serious problem with one of his students. The class clown, a fifth-grader named Lil JJ, was always cracking jokes on everybody in class. He could bust up a whole class, wrestle the attention away from teachers. Bright's problem? He couldn't stop laughing. "He'd be ragging on other teachers, right there in class," Bright, 32, says. "I knew I shouldn't laugh, but I couldn't help it."
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Bellamy has a way of looking into the camera and addressing just you . It doesn't matter if he's introducing the latest Salt N' Pepa video or interviewing Janet Jackson. There's something about the way he laughs, moves and makes eye contact that tells you you've been singled out of the Generation X audience. The MTV veejay's flirtatious manner isn't reserved just for the camera, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When media critics, educators and others last year were accusing African American-oriented shows such as "Martin," "Living Single" and "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam" of perpetuating racial stereotypes, "South Central" was hailed as a breakthrough program that finally showed blacks in an honest, gritty yet positive light. And it wasn't even on the air.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|