Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussell T Davies
IN THE NEWS

Russell T Davies

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Every year at this time, a terribly old yet terrifically youthful supernatural being drops in from out of the sky. I speak of course of the Doctor, as in "Doctor Who," whose annual Christmas special premieres Sunday — Christmas itself! — on BBC America. In Great Britain, this event amounts to a national tradition; but for followers here, it is no less of a calendar moment, a candle in winter coming months after the end of the last season and months before the beginning of the next, when the days are actually at their darkest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Every year at this time, a terribly old yet terrifically youthful supernatural being drops in from out of the sky. I speak of course of the Doctor, as in "Doctor Who," whose annual Christmas special premieres Sunday — Christmas itself! — on BBC America. In Great Britain, this event amounts to a national tradition; but for followers here, it is no less of a calendar moment, a candle in winter coming months after the end of the last season and months before the beginning of the next, when the days are actually at their darkest.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
For another two weeks, David Tennant is still the space-time-traveling Doctor in " Doctor Who," the British sci-fi series that airs here on BBC America. After a year in which the show appeared only sporadically, as a series of "specials," the end of the Tennant tenancy arrives all in a rush: "The Waters of Mars," his penultimate adventure, premieres tonight, with the two-part finale, "The End of Time," beginning Dec. 26. By the end of Part 2, which airs Jan. 2 -- and this is not a spoiler -- he will have died and regenerated into the form of his replacement, Matt Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
For another two weeks, David Tennant is still the space-time-traveling Doctor in " Doctor Who," the British sci-fi series that airs here on BBC America. After a year in which the show appeared only sporadically, as a series of "specials," the end of the Tennant tenancy arrives all in a rush: "The Waters of Mars," his penultimate adventure, premieres tonight, with the two-part finale, "The End of Time," beginning Dec. 26. By the end of Part 2, which airs Jan. 2 -- and this is not a spoiler -- he will have died and regenerated into the form of his replacement, Matt Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2008 | Alison Pollet, Special to The Times
It was a damp and windy afternoon in Cardiff, and Russell T. Davies had a cold. Also, he had been crying. He had just watched the latest cut of a new "Doctor Who" episode, and one scene really moved him. "I'm going to look really stupid," he later admitted to worrying. "But it was so beautiful, I was bloody crying." Davies has had a long-founded emotional investment in "Doctor Who," Britain's beloved science-fiction series about a mysterious time-traveler and his companions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2008 | Robert Lloyd
SEX and science fiction go together like dilithium crystals and warp drives. But "Torchwood," returning this week for a second season on BBC America, makes a point of it: The universe runs on desire. A sci-fi soap opera about talented outside-the-government investigators policing a space-time rift -- in Cardiff, Wales, as good a place as any -- it belongs to the same fictional universe as creator Russell T.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
Ten good (and mostly new) things in TV this year. " Food Party" (IFC). Puppet-filled, cardboard-and-glitter surrealist cooking show (sort of) lasted only six episodes, about 10 minutes each, but was easily the most exciting thing I saw this year -- poetic, goofy, beautiful, strange. "Bored to Death" (HBO). Brooklyn lit-scene bromantic faux-noir stoner comedy about the attitude of doing right. "Parks & Recreation" (NBC). Institutional small-town comedy mocks its characters but not their aspirations or optimism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2000 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showtime announced Friday that the pay cable channel will produce an American adaptation of "Queer as Folk," the hit British drama series that has earned rave reviews and much press attention for its frank and witty look at young gay life in Manchester, England. Created by Russell T. Davies, "Queer as Folk" debuted two years ago on the U.K.'
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
As audacious premises go, the transformation of a young British bloke from nebbishy video store clerk to the purported son of God is world-class, and that may be reason enough to tune into tonight's thought-provoking BBC America miniseries "The Second Coming." Written by Russell T. Davies ("Queer as Folk") and directed by Adrian Shergold ("Inspector Morse"), the ambitious production runs nearly three hours, broken into two back-to-back segments beginning at 5 p.m. and repeating at 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2005 | From Associated Press
A time-traveling blast from the past -- and the future -- has become one of the biggest hits of Britain's television present. A BBC update of the hugely popular science-fiction series "Doctor Who," complete with killer robots from outer space and a rickety wooden police box that zips through the millenniums, has introduced a new generation to a TV classic that originally ran from 1963 to 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2008 | Alison Pollet, Special to The Times
It was a damp and windy afternoon in Cardiff, and Russell T. Davies had a cold. Also, he had been crying. He had just watched the latest cut of a new "Doctor Who" episode, and one scene really moved him. "I'm going to look really stupid," he later admitted to worrying. "But it was so beautiful, I was bloody crying." Davies has had a long-founded emotional investment in "Doctor Who," Britain's beloved science-fiction series about a mysterious time-traveler and his companions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2008 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
Like a grandparent's birthday, the Sci Fi Channel's fourth season finale for "Doctor Who" reeled back in its children. Characters from the cult hit show's two BBC spinoffs, "Torchwood" and "The Sarah Jane Adventures," pitched in to help the Doctor (well, two-and-a-half Doctors, really! Long story!) save the whole universe from certain doom.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
No other show in the history of television has journeyed as far and wide, as deep and high as the BBC's sci-fi classic "Doctor Who," which celebrates its 50th anniversary on Saturday. Generations of fans have seen 11 incarnations of the Time Lord from Gallifrey hurtle through the heavens in his British police box-shaped TARDIS, saving countless lives and planets with his sonic screwdriver and general cleverness, and mourning those he could not. Monsters have bowed before him, as have queens both historical and fictitious.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|