Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRussell Wheeler
IN THE NEWS

Russell Wheeler

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
September 4, 2010
With the exception of his two Supreme Court nominees, President Obama hasn't made a priority of fully staffing the federal judiciary. Meanwhile, Republicans have stalled the appointments Obama has made in an adolescent grudge match with Democrats — which each party blames the other for beginning. The result, according to an article this week by Times staff writer Carol J. Williams, is that about one in eight federal judgeships is vacant. Overall, Obama has fared worse than other recent presidents in having judicial nominees confirmed by the Senate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 4, 2010
With the exception of his two Supreme Court nominees, President Obama hasn't made a priority of fully staffing the federal judiciary. Meanwhile, Republicans have stalled the appointments Obama has made in an adolescent grudge match with Democrats — which each party blames the other for beginning. The result, according to an article this week by Times staff writer Carol J. Williams, is that about one in eight federal judgeships is vacant. Overall, Obama has fared worse than other recent presidents in having judicial nominees confirmed by the Senate.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
With seven children to care for and a caseload that quadrupled this past year, U.S. District Judge Stephen G. Larson says he can no longer afford his prestigious lifetime appointment. The 44-year-old, named to the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California less than four years ago, is the latest defection in an accelerating nationwide trend toward leaving the federal bench long before retirement age to earn more money in private practice. Vacancies in the federal judiciary are mounting, and too few of the best legal minds are stepping forward to replace them, judicial analysts say. They attribute what they see as a troubling phenomenon to Congress' failure for nearly two decades to pass a significant pay increase for federal judges or to expand their numbers to handle a soaring caseload.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Federal judges in gulf states have been extensively invested in the oil and gas industries for decades, and those interests threaten to create a logjam for the 150-plus lawsuits and legal challenges prompted by the BP spill. Seven of the 12 federal judges of the Eastern District of Louisiana already have cited potential conflicts of interest in bowing out of cases brought by fishermen, charter operators, tourist services and families of those killed in the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Federal court officials declared a judicial emergency Tuesday in Arizona, allowing courts to delay criminal trials up to six months because of a shortage of judges worsened by the shooting death two weeks ago in Tucson of the state's chief jurist. Arizona federal courts were already overwhelmed by a 65% increase in criminal cases in the last two years and two judicial vacancies when U.S. District Judge John M. Roll was killed in the Jan. 8 attack that also severely wounded Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
President Obama is preparing to name six new federal judges for California, an opportunity to put his stamp on the judiciary that has court-watchers recalling his campaign promises to make selections in a bipartisan manner and to name judges with "empathy" and "heart."
NATIONAL
August 30, 2010 | Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Almost one in eight federal judgeships is vacant in the country and legal scholars warn that the increasingly politicized confirmation process threatens the administration of justice across the nation. Democrats and Obama administration officials accuse the Republican minority in the Senate of systematically opposing the president's nominees to prevent him from putting his stamp on a judiciary that, Democrats say, moved to the right under President George W. Bush. Republicans and conservative analysts say the stalled pace of "replenishment" is part payback for congressional Democrats' efforts to scuttle some Bush nominees and part indifference on the part of President Obama, who they say has been slow to nominate judges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2011 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Five judges from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals have died this year, worsening an already critical case backlog and spotlighting President Obama's inability to put his judicial choices and stamp on the powerful court. The deaths of four semi-retired senior jurists and full-time Circuit Judge Pamela Ann Rymer have intensified concerns on the aging bench and among judicial scholars that the 9th Circuit will fall farther behind in what is already the slowest pace of dispensing justice in the federal courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The pile of unread magazines and novels on her bedside table is Judge Betty Fletcher's only regret in letting retirement elude her. Fletcher, who turns 88 this month and relies on a walker to navigate airports and courthouse corridors, retired a dozen years ago yet still works full time, on what is known as senior status, for the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. She travels throughout the court's nine-state region for hearings and spends seven days a week poring over foot-high stacks of written filings.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|