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NEWS
September 15, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under prodding from Moscow, the Bush Administration announced Monday a $1.15-billion expansion of U.S. agricultural aid to help Russia endure another food crisis expected this winter. Faced with forecasts of a shortfall again in the Russian harvest, as well as continuing signs of severe disruptions in the Russian food distribution system, the Bush Administration responded to requests two weeks ago from Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin for quick action on food aid before the onset of winter. U.
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NEWS
May 2, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They rise like giants from an ancient myth, twin green titans grinding the earth beneath them in a stately procession across the plain. Huge, new John Deere tractors, the latest in agricultural mechanization, they are objects of wonder and hope to the people of the Banner--formerly Red Banner--collective farm.
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NEWS
October 20, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In July the wheat crop failed, roasted alive in the dust as the sun baked the hard earth of Russia's southern steppe to 160 degrees. Soviet-era collective farms around here lie in ruins, the livestock killed and butchered, barns and dwellings pillaged by scavengers. The local administration of this isolated, semidesert area has run out of cash, and in the largest town, half of the adult population is jobless.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite shortages of fertilizer, farm equipment and forced labor, Russia is expecting a record harvest this fall. After years of humiliating dependence on Western wheat, and a 1992 harvest so poor that Russians feared they would go hungry last winter, Moscow now says it can cut back on some imports and hopes to stop importing bread grains entirely by 1994. Poor harvests have been the downfall of many a Russian leader, and a bumper crop is a political victory. President Boris N.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Sees No Grain Imports Next Year: A bumper grain harvest in 1993 means Russia will not need to import grain next year, Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Zaveryukha told Russian television. Zaveryukha, who is responsible for agriculture, said the grain harvest will be between 115 million and 120 million metric tons and that this year's imports will be restricted to feed grain and oil seed meal under a humanitarian contract already signed with the United States.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | VIKTOR K. GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The voice of Russian peasantry, historically so feeble, echoed again Tuesday in downtown Moscow as people from Central Russia's farming areas protested the government's agricultural policy or--as they put it--lack of one. Standing stoically in the rare September sunshine, the 1,500 protesters held up signs bearing slogans such as "Unhappy Peasant--Unhappy Country" and "We Are Losing Faith in Our Government."
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday attempted to silence Alexander V. Rutskoi, his increasingly critical vice president, by putting him in charge of agriculture, long the most troubled sector of the Russian economy. Yeltsin, under attack from both conservatives and radicals over his economic reforms, said he has ordered Rutskoi to oversee the establishment of private farming as Russia ends more than six decades of collective agriculture.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOANNE LEVINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It didn't seem like a big deal. They were only planting a handful of potatoes in a swampy plot of land. But nine Russian Orthodox priests were here to bless the event, and looking on were a crowd of Russian government and church officials, two busloads of American missionaries and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller, the TV preacher who had come all the way from the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove. Schuller was there, he said, to plant religion along with the potatoes.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia to Cut Grain Imports: President Boris Yeltsin said Russia's bountiful harvest will cut the need to seek grain from abroad by 60% this year. Grain threshing has been completed on 70% of cultivated land, and the yield is the highest in five years, Yeltsin said. The grain harvest is a sensitive issue in Russia, where bread is one of the few affordable staples.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the slothful days of the Soviet Union, when state farms were the domain of drunks and dunces, Russia could never feed itself despite its vast expanses of chocolaty soil and a millennium-old agrarian tradition. What was missing, mused the scholars and scribes who watched this country stagger under central planning, was that capitalist notion of individual incentive. Without the promise of personal profit, Ivan just couldn't be bothered to tend those cows or nurture those crops.
NEWS
December 2, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The coal miners have been threatening to strike again. Power plant workers once more are demanding overdue wages. And now, this week's announcement: The government owes cars, refrigerators and television sets to hundreds of thousands of farmers who turned over their crops five years ago in exchange for promises of luxury goods. From her paper-heaped desk at the Finance Ministry, Elena Martianova sees no way out.
NEWS
January 31, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viktor S. Kuzmin, one of Russia's pioneering private farmers, had a brave new idea: Break the state grain monopoly. American officials approved, and in September, Kuzmin and 12 other farmers in the southern Russian region of Saratov were given a no-interest loan to build grain storage and milling facilities that would allow them to market their own products. But what happened next bears out some U.S.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Sees No Grain Imports Next Year: A bumper grain harvest in 1993 means Russia will not need to import grain next year, Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Zaveryukha told Russian television. Zaveryukha, who is responsible for agriculture, said the grain harvest will be between 115 million and 120 million metric tons and that this year's imports will be restricted to feed grain and oil seed meal under a humanitarian contract already signed with the United States.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite shortages of fertilizer, farm equipment and forced labor, Russia is expecting a record harvest this fall. After years of humiliating dependence on Western wheat, and a 1992 harvest so poor that Russians feared they would go hungry last winter, Moscow now says it can cut back on some imports and hopes to stop importing bread grains entirely by 1994. Poor harvests have been the downfall of many a Russian leader, and a bumper crop is a political victory. President Boris N.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOANNE LEVINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It didn't seem like a big deal. They were only planting a handful of potatoes in a swampy plot of land. But nine Russian Orthodox priests were here to bless the event, and looking on was a crowd of Russian government and church officials, two busloads of American missionaries and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller, the TV preacher who had come all the way from the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif. Schuller was there, he said, to plant religion along with the potatoes.
NEWS
August 23, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the slothful days of the Soviet Union, when state farms were the domain of drunks and dunces, Russia could never feed itself despite its vast expanses of chocolaty soil and a millennium-old agrarian tradition. What was missing, mused the scholars and scribes who watched this country stagger under central planning, was that capitalist notion of individual incentive. Without the promise of personal profit, Ivan just couldn't be bothered to tend those cows or nurture those crops.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOANNE LEVINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It didn't seem like a big deal. They were only planting a handful of potatoes in a swampy plot of land. But nine Russian Orthodox priests were here to bless the event, and looking on were a crowd of Russian government and church officials, two busloads of American missionaries and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller, the TV preacher who had come all the way from the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove. Schuller was there, he said, to plant religion along with the potatoes.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | JOANNE LEVINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It didn't seem like a big deal. They were only planting a handful of potatoes in a swampy plot of land. But nine Russian Orthodox priests were here to bless the event, and looking on was a crowd of Russian government and church officials, two busloads of American missionaries and the Rev. Robert H. Schuller, the TV preacher who had come all the way from the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif. Schuller was there, he said, to plant religion along with the potatoes.
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