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WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Khristina Narizhnaya, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW -- Russia detained an American citizen accused of attempting to recruit a local intelligence officer into the CIA, the Federal Security Service said. Ryan Christopher Fogle, the third secretary of the American Embassy in Moscow, was held overnight before being handed back to U.S. authorities Tuesday, according to the Federal Security Service, the Russian intelligence agency known as the FSB. He was carrying a large amount of money, technology, written instructions for the Russian recruit and appearance-changing equipment, the FSB website said.
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WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Khristina Narizhnaya, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW -- Russia detained an American citizen accused of attempting to recruit a local intelligence officer into the CIA, the Federal Security Service said. Ryan Christopher Fogle, the third secretary of the American Embassy in Moscow, was held overnight before being handed back to U.S. authorities Tuesday, according to the Federal Security Service, the Russian intelligence agency known as the FSB. He was carrying a large amount of money, technology, written instructions for the Russian recruit and appearance-changing equipment, the FSB website said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Vladimir V. Putin today pardoned American businessman Edmond Pope, who had been sentenced to 20 years in prison on espionage charges, the Kremlin said. The Interfax news agency said Pope was released from Lefortovo prison. A presidential spokesman said that Putin had pardoned Pope and cleared the way for him to leave Russian immediately. A U.S. Embassy doctor was expected to check Pope's health and determine whether he could fly to the United States.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Tito's countdown has begun. Russian space officials, defying complaints from NASA, on Wednesday formally approved the 60-year-old Los Angeles millionaire to serve as the third member of Moscow's next mission to the International Space Station. They set the launch date for April 28. Tito will fork over about $20 million for the flight, making him the world's first American "space tourist." But he considers himself a space pioneer in his own right.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Tito's countdown has begun. Russian space officials, defying complaints from NASA, on Wednesday formally approved the 60-year-old Los Angeles millionaire to serve as the third member of Moscow's next mission to the International Space Station. They set the launch date for April 28. Tito will fork over about $20 million for the flight, making him the world's first American "space tourist." But he considers himself a space pioneer in his own right.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
While the boom in graduate business education cools in the United States, American universities are finding eager new students of capitalism in places like Blagoveschensk, a bustling Russian river port on the Chinese border. There, for the last six months, Portland State University has been offering an executive master's degree in business administration program to 23 students who hope to export the region's timber, gold and soybeans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
At an Orthodox seminary in St. Petersburg, Russia, an American church visitor observed several U.S. evangelists trying to imprint their particular brand of Christianity on students training for the Russian church's ministry. "A variety of Western evangelists would corner students in the dormitory hallways or other places, trying to proselytize them," said the Rev. Elaine Stanovsky, head of the Greater Church Council of Seattle. "I was appalled," she added. "It broke my heart."
BUSINESS
October 19, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, in a Moscow hotel over a glass of Armenian cognac, Glendale consultant Jody Darling agreed to help a former Soviet military complex privatize. In exchange he got 5% ownership. From the outside, the factory doesn't look like much. Located in the ancient Russian city of Yaroslavl, about 150 miles north of Moscow, is a huge grim-looking factory called Mashpribor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1994 | RICHARD COVINGTON, Richard Covington is a free-lance writer based in Paris
The rangy former soccer star-turned-housekeeper waltzes blithely into the bathroom, towel in hand, and stops dead in his tracks. His boss--a leggy advertising executive, normally high-powered but considerably less so reclined stark naked in her bath--lets out a scream that would have undone the starchiest of her boarding school matrons. He retreats, she scrambles for cover, glaring. The laugh track explodes. If there's an odd sense of deja vu to this scene, it's for good reason.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) offered a full-throated defense of the government's collection of data on billions of American phone calls, saying Wednesday that the National Security Agency's practices have safeguarded the nation without trampling on civil liberties. “What keeps me up at night, candidly, is another attack against the United States. And I see enough of the threat stream to know that is possible,” Feinstein said at a Pacific Council on International Policy dinner in Century City.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Vladimir V. Putin today pardoned American businessman Edmond Pope, who had been sentenced to 20 years in prison on espionage charges, the Kremlin said. The Interfax news agency said Pope was released from Lefortovo prison. A presidential spokesman said that Putin had pardoned Pope and cleared the way for him to leave Russian immediately. A U.S. Embassy doctor was expected to check Pope's health and determine whether he could fly to the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1994 | RICHARD COVINGTON, Richard Covington is a free-lance writer based in Paris
The rangy former soccer star-turned-housekeeper waltzes blithely into the bathroom, towel in hand, and stops dead in his tracks. His boss--a leggy advertising executive, normally high-powered but considerably less so reclined stark naked in her bath--lets out a scream that would have undone the starchiest of her boarding school matrons. He retreats, she scrambles for cover, glaring. The laugh track explodes. If there's an odd sense of deja vu to this scene, it's for good reason.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, in a Moscow hotel over a glass of Armenian cognac, Glendale consultant Jody Darling agreed to help a former Soviet military complex privatize. In exchange he got 5% ownership. From the outside, the factory doesn't look like much. Located in the ancient Russian city of Yaroslavl, about 150 miles north of Moscow, is a huge grim-looking factory called Mashpribor.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
While the boom in graduate business education cools in the United States, American universities are finding eager new students of capitalism in places like Blagoveschensk, a bustling Russian river port on the Chinese border. There, for the last six months, Portland State University has been offering an executive master's degree in business administration program to 23 students who hope to export the region's timber, gold and soybeans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
At an Orthodox seminary in St. Petersburg, Russia, an American church visitor observed several U.S. evangelists trying to imprint their particular brand of Christianity on students training for the Russian church's ministry. "A variety of Western evangelists would corner students in the dormitory hallways or other places, trying to proselytize them," said the Rev. Elaine Stanovsky, head of the Greater Church Council of Seattle. "I was appalled," she added. "It broke my heart."
SPORTS
March 29, 1995 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radka Kovarikova and Rene Novotny considered skating off into the sunset of professional ice shows last year, after they finished sixth among pairs at the Lillehammer Olympics. But Kovarikova and Novotny, who left their native Czech Republic to train in Lake Arrowhead the last three seasons, thought they had more medal-caliber performances left in them. "We wanted to prove we are at the top level," Kovarikova said.
SPORTS
July 31, 1988 | Associated Press
Goodwill and baseball is what a team of high school-aged players from Hoboken, N.J., hopes to bring to the Soviet Union. The team, dubbed the U.S. Ambassadors, leaves Aug. 17 for a 10-day, 3-city tour of the U.S.S.R. "We'd like to teach them about baseball and life in America," Derek England, a 15-year-old third baseman-outfielder, said. "And we want to learn what life is like in Russia." The Americans, aged 14 to 16, will play games at Moscow, Kiev and Tbilisi.
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