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BUSINESS
August 12, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The military and intelligence services of Russia and China are conducting a sustained campaign to steal American commercial and military secrets through cyber espionage, according to the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, and he warned that sophisticated computer hacking poses a major danger to U.S. interests. "Nation states are investing huge amounts of time, personnel and money to steal our data," Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) said Friday in a speech to an association of retired U.S. intelligence officers.
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WORLD
September 23, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Syrian President Bashar Assad promised Monday to comply with international efforts to remove his chemical weapons, even as he sharply criticized the United States and other Western powers for proposing a United Nations resolution that add teeth to the deal. In an interview in Damascus with Chinese state television , Assad said the U.S., France, and Britain want "to appear victorious in their battles against an imaginary enemy, which they assume is Syria. " He also warned that rebels seeking to overthrow his government would attempt to disrupt the work of international inspectors seeking to catalog and impound Syria's chemical weapons.  But, he said, "there is nothing to worry about" because the weapons -- which Syria only recently acknowledged possessing -- are "in secure sites" under the control of his army.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | By Christi Parsons and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Tensions rose ahead of this week's Group of 20 summit as Russia and China on Monday joined in the criticisms of the Federal Reserve's plan to pump billions of dollars into the U.S. credit system ? even as President Obama took the unusual step of defending the central bank's action as good for the global economy. After initially saying he wouldn't comment on specific Fed actions, Obama then jumped into the increasingly testy international spat by saying that the Fed's mandate, like his, is to grow the U.S. economy.
OPINION
September 12, 2013 | By Ilai Saltzman
For more than a decade - after he replaced Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin and even during the time he had to serve as prime minister under his protege, Dmitry Medvedev - Russian President Vladimir Putin has systematically and consistently pursued a policy that can be labeled the Putin Doctrine. In a nutshell, Putin seeks to renew Russia's status and influence in both regional and global politics and make the Russian Federation a great power again. To achieve this goal, he challenges and subverts America's posture and interests, relying on three main components.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told a Senate committee that U.S. officials have reached an agreement with U.N. Security Council members China, Russia, Britain and France for a draft sanctions resolution that will be sent to the full 15-member council later Tuesday. The announcement to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee came one day after Iran offered a diplomatic proposal that many Western leaders view as an attempt to deflect the new round of economic strictures.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | Reuters
Russia and China will sign an agreement not to target each other with strategic missiles when Chinese President Jiang Zemin visits Moscow from Sept. 2 to 6, a senior Foreign Ministry official said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1990
China's trade surplus with the U.S. will shoot up to as high as $10 billion this year, but the Bush Administration continues to grant it the most-favored-nation status. Even if this is not ridiculous, this will certainly hold the seed of new friction in Washington-Beijing relations. It is true the U.S. needs China's help during the Persian Gulf crisis, but the help should be motivated by the love of peace, not the love of money. If Saddam Hussein had no Scud and Silkworm missiles, what do people need to fear of him?
OPINION
February 21, 2008
Re "U.S., many in EU recognize Kosovo," Feb. 19 Kosovo declares independence, and nations with disaffected minorities such as Russia and China cry bad precedent. We need to remember the causative event: Slobodan Milosevic, with violence and threat of destruction, tried to expel Albanian Kosovars from their ancestral home. Similar to the Holocaust, this is an event that changed history. To all nations with disaffected minorities, including the U.S.: Don't think that violence or repression will change history in your favor.
OPINION
September 12, 2013 | By Ilai Saltzman
For more than a decade - after he replaced Boris Yeltsin in the Kremlin and even during the time he had to serve as prime minister under his protege, Dmitry Medvedev - Russian President Vladimir Putin has systematically and consistently pursued a policy that can be labeled the Putin Doctrine. In a nutshell, Putin seeks to renew Russia's status and influence in both regional and global politics and make the Russian Federation a great power again. To achieve this goal, he challenges and subverts America's posture and interests, relying on three main components.
WORLD
September 23, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Syrian President Bashar Assad promised Monday to comply with international efforts to remove his chemical weapons, even as he sharply criticized the United States and other Western powers for proposing a United Nations resolution that add teeth to the deal. In an interview in Damascus with Chinese state television , Assad said the U.S., France, and Britain want "to appear victorious in their battles against an imaginary enemy, which they assume is Syria. " He also warned that rebels seeking to overthrow his government would attempt to disrupt the work of international inspectors seeking to catalog and impound Syria's chemical weapons.  But, he said, "there is nothing to worry about" because the weapons -- which Syria only recently acknowledged possessing -- are "in secure sites" under the control of his army.
WORLD
June 25, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - With Edward Snowden tucked away in or near a bustling international airport here, Russia and China hit back Tuesday against the United States, denying charges that they had helped him avoid arrest under a felony warrant for espionage as he fled Hong Kong and laid over in Moscow. "The accusations against the Chinese government are groundless," said Hua Chunying, the spokeswoman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry. "Mr. Snowden is a free man, and the sooner he chooses his final destination, the better both for him and for us," Russian President Vladimir Putin declared.
WORLD
June 24, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI - Washington would not look favorably if it turns out that China and Russia purposely chose to ignore American desires to apprehend National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden on three felony counts, U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said on a three-day visit to India. Terming Snowden an indicted felon, Kerry said all appropriate countries have been notified of his status. “It would be very disappointing if he was willfully allowed to board an airplane” from Hong Kong to Moscow, Kerry said at a news conference with Indian Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid, adding that he “would be deeply troubled” if Russia and China knew of Snowden's plans, “and there would be, without any question, some effect and impact on the relationship and consequences.” “I'd urge them to live within the law,” Kerry added.
WORLD
April 15, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Military spending fell last year in the United States and across western and central Europe, but surged in Russia, China, the Middle East and North Africa, according to new figures released by a research group based in Sweden. The changes “may be the beginning of a shift in the balance of world military spending from the rich Western countries to emerging nations,” Sam Perlo-Freeman of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute said in a statement announcing the report Monday.
WORLD
February 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
South Korea's successful satellite launch this week served as the latest act of one-upmanship in an accelerating space race gripping Northeast Asia. Membership in the elite global space club is being pursued by wealthy countries that can afford it as well as economic basket cases that cannot, a quest for political stature driven more by emotion and nationalism than economic promise. What nations get out of creating their own space programs is a heady cocktail of national pride, technological muscle-flexing and the power to project military menace as a reminder to neighbors that they won't back down from the region's mounting territorial disputes.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The U.S. intelligence community is nearing completion of its first detailed review of cyber-spying against American targets from abroad, including an attempt to calculate U.S. financial losses from hacker attacks based in China, officials said. The National Intelligence Estimate, the first involving cyber-espionage, also will seek to determine how large a role the Chinese government plays in directing or coordinating digital attacks aimed at stealing U.S. intellectual property, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a classified undertaking.
WORLD
July 19, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Edmund Sanders
WASHINGTON - After pressing for 16 months for a change in government in Syria, the Obama administration is scrambling to prevent growing bloodshed and the apparent unraveling of President Bashar Assad's hold on power from paving the way to regional calamity. A day after the brazen assassination of three top military aides suggested armed insurgents had begun to gain the upper hand, Assad appeared on state-run TV on Thursday to show he was alive as heavy fighting continued for a fifth consecutive day in parts of the capital, Damascus.
OPINION
August 28, 2006
Re "Masters of muddle," editorial, Aug. 24 The Times correctly asserts that Iran's latest response to the U.N. Security Council's deadline for stopping uranium enrichment is another example of stalling for time. The editorial is also correct in stating that Russia and China are reluctant to agree with any meaningful sanctions because of their economic ties to Iran. However, the conclusion that a military option is out of the question for now simply does not follow. After so much obfuscation on the part of Iran, it is now time to put the military option on the table.
WORLD
June 7, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Employing his gloomiest assessment to date, United Nations special envoy Kofi Annan acknowledged Thursday that his six-point peace plan was not working and warned that Syria was headed down a path of "brutal repression, massacres, sectarian violence and even all-out civil war. " His address came as he and other officials condemned a massacre of dozens of civilians near the central city of Hama, and as diplomats proposed crafting a...
OPINION
May 31, 2012
Kofi Annan, the United Nations' special envoy for Syria, believes the horrific massacre by suspected pro-government militias of more than 100 people, mostly women and children, in the township of Houla will serve as a "tipping point. " But toward what action should that atrocity "tip" the international community or the "Friends of Syria," an association of sympathetic nations? Should the United States arm rebel forces, as GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney proposes, or engage in airstrikes against President Bashar Assad's forces, as Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)
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